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Full text of "Sponsor"

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UER PLAZA, NEW YORK, M. V 






- 



3RARY 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor132739spon 



4 JULY 198» 
40< ■ copy • $8 a ymmr 



0> 



SPONSOR 



HE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



IfhA 



$ss 



To get your just desserts 

pick any one 

one national brand 



five different 
flavors 

(each preferred 
in its market) 




Where there's a 
Storz Station . . . 

there's 
audience 



The 

STORZ 

Stations 

today's Radio 
for today's selling 

Todd Storz. President 
Home Office: Omaha 




CBS TV 
BREWS UP 
A STORM 



Net"- new re>earch 
gives edge to CBS 
o&o's. Other nets and 
independents countei 

Page 27 



Where there's 
smoke, there is 
sure to be radio 

Page 30 

Why tv's 

quiz-panel' shows 
go on and on 

Page 36 



fall shows 
reflect public 
taste?— Tv Basir 

Page 39 



WDGY, WHB, KOMA, WQAM 

represented by John Blair & Co. 

WTIX represented by Adam Young Inc. 




QUALITY 



touch. 













*/Tff* 



^itft&wtii'- 



SK^» 



Close your eyes and listen yes, 

it's the one and only! You'd know 
that sound anywhere - that 
"quality touch" which separates 
the champion from the field. 

There's an important difference like 
that, too, among radio and tele- 
vision stations of today. 




radio & television 



dal I as 

BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS ■ EDWARD PETRY A CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTS N 




things happen in the Alps . . . and 

WPEN 
RADIO 
MAKES 
THINGS 
HAPPEN 
IN 
PHILADELPHIA 



WPEN News was awarded citations by 
the Associated Press Broadcasters' 
Association for "outstanding work in the 
fields of editorial-commentary, freedom 
of information, and outstanding news 
reporting." More evidence that in News 
. . . and in Sales . . . WPEN Makes Things 
Happen In Philadelphia. 

WPEN 

Represented nationally by 
GILL — PERNA 

New York. Chicago. Los Angeles. San Francisco Boston. Detroit 



How to 
Persuade the 

Knoxville 
Market 




It takes a powerful medi- 
um to sell in the big, wide- 
spread 1,600.000 Knoxville 
Trading Area. WBIR-TV's 
top power ... top audience 
. . . top programming . . . 
and leadership in top-rated 
shows get the job done. Call 
your Katz Man. 

WBIR-TV 

CHANN EL "I i~k 

KNOXVILLE-TENN. 



© Vol. 13, No. 27 • 4 JULY 195© 

S PO N S OR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

CBS tv research brews up a storm 

27 CBS o&o study claims better image, more commercial effectiveness for 
its stations in N.Y. and L.A., gives nod to net over indie tv outlets 

Where there's smoke, there's radio 

30 A $4 billion industry invested $4 million during the first quarter of 
1959. Here is a look at the tobacco business and why radio does so well 

New price laws bring change in auto pitch 

32 When windshield price posting regulation took the edge off its price 
pitch, this car dealer found that tv could sell family budget plans 

Franks with an image — thanks to radio 

34 Peet Packing borrowed a network personality, utilized flexibility of 
local stations to create a "national" image in its regional markets 

Local radio/tv sells prefabricated houses 

35 WAPI-TV, WPAI, Birmingham provided double-barreled air power for 
The Home Insulation Co.'s campaign, drew 3,000 in spite of bad weather 

Why the 'quiz-panel' shows are tv staples 

36 Last fall's quiz show scandals didn't affect such hardy perennials as 
What's My Line, I've Got a Secret. Here's why panel shows live long 

Let's grow cold together . . . 

38 I n ^0 lines of sprightly verse, Ted Smith, veteran salesman for Adam 
Young Inc., airs his views about spot radio's present situation 

Do web shows really mirror public tastes? 

39 With a few exceptions, says Nielsen study comparing tv viewing habits 
by program type with net schedules latest comparagraph listings 



FEATURES 

22 Commercial Commentary 
62 Film-Scope 
24 49th and Madison 
58 News & Idea Wrap-Up 
lO Newsmaker of the Week 
58 Picture Wrap-Up 
48 Sponsor Asks 
64 Sponsor Hears 



1 7 Sponsor-Scope 

80 Sponsor Speaks 

50 Spot Buys 

80 Ten-Second Spots 

12 Timebuyers at Work 

78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

61 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications ISjM^i 

Audit of Circulations Inc. " * wm a 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



TOPS 
IN "BOX OFFICE"! 



WHO-TV's spectacular library of film packages* — 
loaded with award-winning movies — means 
"box office" for YOU, in Central Iowa! 

Three times each weekday, thousands of viewers — 

men, women and children — watch film features on 

WHO-TV. WHO-TV programs these films 

in choice, low-cost time periods, and their ratings 

(Monday-Friday) are tremendously higher 

than those of competition, according to ARB 

for March 16-April 12, 1959: 

FAMILY THEATRE (Noon-2 p.m.) 44.3% 

EARLY SHOW— Cartoons (4:30 p.m.-5:05 p.m.) 36.1% 

EARLY SHOW— Feature (5:05 p.m.-6 p.m.) 29.9% 

LATE SHOW (10:30 p.m.-Sign-Off) 25.8% 

PGW can give you all the details on WHO-TV 
and what "box office" in Central Iowa means 
to you. Ask your Colonel! 



*WARNER BROTHERS "Feature" and -Vanguard," 
MGM Groups 1 and 3, NT A "Champagne," "Rocket 86," 
"Dream," "Lion," "Big 50," SCREEN GEMS 
"Sweet 65," HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE 
"Constellation," M and A ALEXANDER "Imperial Prestige," 
ABC's "Galaxy 20" and others. 



ARB SURVEY 

METROPOLITAN DES MOINES AREA 
(March 16-April 12, 1959) 



FIRST PLACE QUARTER 


HOURS 






Number Reported 


Percentag 


e of Total 




1-Week 


4-Week 


1-Week 


4-Week 


WHO-TV 


233 


227 


50.0% 


48.7% 


Station K 


186 


197 


40.0% 


42.3% 


Station W 


27 


42 


6.0% 


9.0% 


Ties 


20 





4.0% 






WHO-TV is part of 

Central Broadcasting Company, 

which also owns and operates 

WHO Radio, Des Moines 

WOC-TV, Davenport 



WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 

noi^WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WHO-TV 
WH«rV 
WHli 
WH 
VH 





WHO-TV 

Channel 13 • Des Moines 



mp- 



Col. B. J. Palmer, President 

P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 

Robert H. Harter, Sales Manager 

Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc., 
National Representatives 




Affiliati 



SPONSOR 



4 jiia L959 



WEBk 



39 THRILLING FIRST-RUN FILMED 
HALF-HOURS BASED ON SAN DIEGO 
POLICE DEPARTMENT FILES!... FOR 
LOCAL AND REGIONAL SPONSORSHIP! 

REALLY DIFFERENT! 

It's the unusual story of a tough, resolute 
police officer ... the eager, ambitious rookies 
he trains . . . and his friend, a resourceful, 
conscientious police-reporter. 

. . . And the story of a melting-pot city- 
San Diego ... and its people-the fishermen, 
the sailors, the barkeeps, the bankers- 
fully-drawn characters in intriguing situations. 





sponsor • 4 JULY 1959 



STARRING 



CO-STARRING 



VICTOR JORY PATRICK McVEY 



NEW! ALREADY SOLD TO 



ALKA SELTZER 

(Los Angeles, San Francisco) 

COORS BEER 

(Rocky Mountain Regional) 

GENESEE BREWING 

(Nine Markets Including 
Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse) 

PLUS 

45 LOCAL ADVERTISERS 







In Houston 

HOOPER 




&w 



K-NUZ 



\ 



Houston's^ 24-Hour 
-Music ahd^News_ 



National Reps.: 

THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

• New York • St. Louis 

• Chicago * San Francisco 

• Detroit * Los Angeles 

• Atlanta * Dallas 

IN HOUSTON, 

CALL DAVE MORRIS 

JAckson 3-2581 



I 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RAOtO ADVERTISERS USE 

Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 
Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miltsch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowit? 

Contributing Editor 

loe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Administrative Mgr. 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 
Southern Manager 
Herb Martin 
Midwest Manager 
Roy Meachum 
Eastern Manager 
Robert Brokaw 
Production Manager 
Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 

George Becker; Priscilla Hoffman 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



II 



55 




RENEWALS 

FOR 39 THRILLING NEW HALF-HOURS OF ONE 
OF TV'S BIGGEST SYNDICATION SUCCESSES! 



Jim Davis as Wes Cameron 
and Lang Jeffries as 
Skip Johnson star in 
this suspenseful series. 



RESCUE 



SENSATIONAL RATINGS IN CITY AFTER CITY, WEEK AFTER WEEK 
FOR THIS ACTION-PACKED, DRAMATIC, HUMAN-INTEREST SERIES! 




SPONSOR 



RENEWALS INCLUDE: 

ALKA SELTZER (Multi-Market Regional) 
UTICA CLUB BEER (Multi-Market Regional) 

wtop-tv, washington 
krca, los angeles 
wgn-tv, chicago 
kron-tv, san francisco 
wtvj, miami 
king-tv, seattle 
klz-tv, denver 
wgr-tv, buffalo 
wrva, richmond 
wsyr-tv, syracuse 
kfsd-tv, san diego 
wrgb, schenectady 
kfjz-tv, ft. worth 
wbtv, charlotte 
koat-tv, albuquerque 

• 4 jlily 1959 



For details about 

these exciting 78 half-hours, 

contact 




SCREEN HGEMS.inc 

TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORT 



Z4 





Incredible. ..but true. WBBM-TV keeps topping its own record ratings . Chicago' s 
top station in the past 48 consecutive Nielsen reports, both Nielsen and ARB 
show WBBM-TV first again . . . and by one of the widest margins in its history. 
For example, according to ARB, WBBM-TV f s over-all audience share is at a nine - 
teen-month high of 34.8% . ThaVs a mighty 22% higher than a year ago, 27% higher 
than the second station, 78% higher than the third station and 91% higher than 








the fourth station! Furthermore, as the only Chicago station to increase its share 
of audience and its ratings during the year, WBBM-TV ranks first both daytime 
and nighttime... with an average 37% lead over the nearest competition during 
the day, and an average 16% lead at night. (American Research Bureau, May '59 ) 
To blast all competition, advertise your product on WBBM-TV. It's dynamite! 
Channel 2 in Chicago • CBS Owned - Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales ® 



WE'VE 

BLOWN 

OUR 

TOP 




97.2% 

OF VIEWERS IN 

Albany, Ga. 

ARE TUNED TO 

WALB-TV 




WALB-TV's NEW 

1000 FOOT 
TOWER 

ALMOST DOUBLES THE 
EFFECTIVE WALB-TV 
MARKET IN 
SOUTH CEORCIA AND 
NORTHWEST FLORIDA! 

• GRADE B POPULATION 
NOW IS: 

730,600 

• GRADE B TV HOMES 
NOW ARE: 

126,200 

Write tor 

new Coverage Map! 

WALB-TV 

ALBANY, CA. — CH. 10 




Raymond E. Carow, Ceneral Manager 

Represented Nationally by 
Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 

In the South by James S. Ayers Co. 
One Rate Card 



HH 
10 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



This week, ABC Radio has its first president since Bob East- 
man left the network last April. Edward J. DeGray was 
elected president of the net on 23 June according to an 
announcement by Leonard H. Goldenson, AB-PT president. 

The newsmaker: Amiable, Brooklyn -born, 45-year-old 
Edward J. DeGray brings to broadcasting the same cool, calculated 
will to win that he brought to the tennis courts for many years. In 
national amateur tennis tournaments. DeGray shone as a formidable 
opponent, figuring where to place the ball before he swung. 

"Everybody in network radio," he told sponsor, "knows they have 
a problem. Here at ABC Radio, we're trying to solve it quietly." 

In essence, this is exactly what DeGray has been trying to do dur- 
ing the past year that he was vice president in charge of ABC network 
I during Bob Eastman's tenure, 
ABC Radio was a corporation 
within a corporation — American 
Broadcasting Radio Network, 
Inc. ) . It has since been quietly 
dissolved into an operation the 
same as ABC TV. a part of the 
whole American Broadcasting- 
Paramount Theatres. 

With some 350 affiliates (a num. 
ber of which have been added in 
the past year under the guidance of 
DeGray) , the plans for ABC Radio 
are basically these: To try to make 
network radio work on a basis best for affiliates as well as the network. 

"We'll be strengthening our whole combination of affiliate serv- 
ices," says DeGray. "We want to give our affiliates all the things 
they can't buy locally." The ABC News Call is in for a further 
building-up, for this is very popular with the affils. In addition to 
this, programing is in for a heavy push — "programing of ABC per- 
sonalities to give identity at the local level," says DeGray. The net 
learned through its "specials" starring Frankie Avalon and Eydie 
Gorme that this is one notch in the key to a successful net radio 
operation: in each case they got about 85% clearances. "Both of 
these were pre-sold shows," DeGray said. "One thing we know: 
stations are not interested in long hours of sustaining programs; they 
want something to sell. We don't pretend to know the answers to 
net radio, but we're trying to find the answers through learning what 
the stations want." A good example of DeGray's follow-through to 
such thinking is the snaring by ABC of rights to broadcast the 
Patterson-Johansson heavyweight fight. 

DeGray began his broadcasting career with CBS in 1937. Came 
to ABC in 1955. ^ 




SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 




Better than half the viewing families— 52.6%— watch 
WRGB. The May, 1959 ARB total area survey shows 
Channel 6 delivers more homes than the other two stations 
combined in the Northeastern New York and Western New 
England market. Contact your NBC Spot Sales representa- 
tive for the complete story. 



STATION SHA 
SUNDAY THROUGI SATURDAY 



SIGN-ON 

TO 
SIGN-OFF 






*Sourc«: Total Ar»a ARB, May, 1959 



WRGB CHANNEL 6 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION . . . ALBANY-SCHENECTADY-ffeCj^ 



AN 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

SUH! 







NOW CBS 
RADIO IS 
ON WRNL! 

WRI1L 

910 AM • 102.1 FM 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

REPRESENTED BY 
Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 



Timebuyers 
at work 




Jon Ross, Jon M. Ross Advertising Agency, Los Angeles, feels that 
fm can do a selling job for advertisers in certain areas, but that the 
medium is not convincingly sold. "At this time," Jon says, "we are 
not given sufficient 'valid' measures of the fm audience to justify 
substantial use of it. Fm staffers know this, and they find themselves 
in the position of having to double- 
talk as well as lower their rates in 
order to attract sales. These people 
place too much emphasis on the 
intangibles of advertising with 
snob appeal and esthetic values, 
they provide very little documenta- 
tion of fm's ability to sell strictly 
on a commercial basis. No matter 
how specialized a product is, it 
requires something stronger than \ 
a 'superior sell' to get sales." Jon J 
points out that fm sales are in- 
creasing, that more "average audiences" are listening and that 
to ignore this growth is short-sighted. "To keep pace and sell to 
advertisers." Jon says, "fm salesmen must take positive steps. We 
expect the same kind of evidence we get from other media — carefully 
documented surveys and success stories that prove fm's value." 

Lawrence Curtis, president. Curtis Advertising Co., New York, 
agency for Chateau Martin wines, feels that his agency is able to do 
a better selling job because of its experience with both advertisers 
retailing through stores and those marketing through mail order. 
"Through our mail order schedules, run on every type of station in 

a wide range of markets," Larry 

says, "we've come to know the 

sales impact of stations, their time 

segments and programs. As is the 

practice in mail order, we measure 

the actual cost of the spot against 

the actual dollars taken in. These 

results have become our guide in 

^A *^/mlm recommending stations and avail- 

^jgL abilities to our non-mail order 

^L^IjL^^jjB clients. L;ui\ notes that lii> 

& Al agenc) uses ratings cautiously, in 

view of its findings over the years. 
The correlation between mail order sales and ratings had shown 
no consistency: innumerable times lower rated spots were found to 
be more productive than higher rated spots, and vice versa. "There 
is, of course, no scientific way of judging the worth of time on a 
dollar basis, but we do feel that our approach is the most realistic." 




12 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



% 



I 






■ 



Follow the skyrocketing spot 

as it soars your product sales 

above quotas . . . zooms it 

to a dominant market share. 

The spot medium best 

enables you to match exactly 

your advertising effort 

with sales situations 

in various markets; 

to conform perfectly 

with distribution patterns; 

to equalize varying advertising 

"weight" in network markets. 

In the field of station 

representation, H-R's unique 

Working Partnership 

plays a sweet tune 

for ownership 

and management. 

Such a high degree 

of cooperative effort 

is devoted to all station 

operations affecting spot sales, 

that the stations' 

staff, in effect, is tripled. 

nffjftfrf TTT? Television, Inc. 
wm\ XX JlV Representatives 

'We always send a man to do a man's job" 



H 



••••••., 



WWlfal 



m 



with 



spmt 



,»»• • • 



tune / 







New York • Chicago • San Francisco • Hollywood • Dallas • Detroit • Atlanta • Houston • New Orleans • Des Moines 



CAN'T MISS! 



TRACKDOWN 

One of network television's most 
famous Westerns has just become 
available for syndicated sales... 
and it's a sure-fire hit. Because: 



...TRACKDOWN is the biggest, 
most important Western ever to 
enter first-run syndication, at a 
time when Westerns are at the 
very peak of audience popularity; 



...TRACKDOWN is produced on 
location by Dick Powell's famous 
Four Star Productions, and has 
a well-known star, Robert Culp; 



. . .TRACKDOWN is based on case 
histories taken from the files of 
the fabulous Texas Rangers, and 
is the only television show ever to 
win official endorsement from the 
Rangers and the state of Texas; 



...And TRACKDOWN has proven 
a huge audience -winner, averag- 
ing a 23.0 total Nielsen rating in 
its run on the CBS Television Net- 
work (October 1957- April 1959), 
against the stiffest competition. 

Tired of long shots? TRACKDOWN 
(71 crack half-hours) can't miss! 



. THE BEST FILM PROGRAMS FOR ALL STATIONS- 
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. LOS ANGELES. DETROIT. 
BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. ST. LOUIS. DALLAS 
AND ATLANTA. IN CANADA: S.W.CALDWELL. LTD. 

CBSFILltSi" 




Fact-source for advertising decisions 




JACK DENNINGER, Vice President and 
Eastern Sales Manager, has charge of 
agency-contact in Blair-TV's New York 
office — one of ten offices providing fast, 
efficient service to Advertising. 



A NATIONWIDE ORGANIZATION 



New York City is headquarters for 
more than half the agencies billing 
$25,000,000 or more annually. Each 
business day sees these New York 
agencies reach decisions involving 
more than a million dollars in Spot 
Television . . . decisions that demand 
a basis of factual data with down-to- 
the-moment accuracy. 

When the decisions concern any or 
all among 25 of America's great tele- 
vision stations, these inquiries con- 
verge on a single focus — the New 
York office of Blair-TV. Few organi- 
zations in the entire field of advertis- 
ing have an equally effective system 
for transmitting television data. 

Blair-TV operates on this basic 
principle: that alert, informed repre- 



BLAIR-TV 



sentation is a service vital not only to 
stations but also to all Advertising 
and to the businesses dependent on 
it for volume and profit. From the 
first, our list has been made up of 
stations and markets we felt in posi- 
tion to serve most effectively. Today 
these stations are located in 25 of 
America's greatest markets. Together 
they cover 56 percent of its popula- 
tion, virtually 60 percent of its effec- 
tive buying power. 

In its area, each of these stations 
stands as a powerhouse of selling 
force. To help advertisers and their 
agencies make most profitable use of 
that force, is the primary objective 
toward which the work of our entire 
organization is constantly directed. 



AT THE SERVICE OF ADVERTISING 



WABC-TV- New York 
W-TEN- 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy 
WFBG-TV-Altoona 
WNBF-TV-Binghamton 
WHDH-TV- Boston 



WBKB- Chicago 
WCPO-TV-Cincinnati 
WEWS- Cleveland 
WBNS-TV-Columbus 
KFJZ-TV-Dallas-Ft. Worth 
WXYZ-TV- Detroit 



KFRE-TV- Fresno 
WNHC-TV- 

Hartford-New Haven 
KTTV- Los Angeles 
WMCT- Memphis 
WDSU-TV-New Orleans 



WOW-TV- 

Omaha-Council Bluffs 
WFIL-TV- Philadelphia 
WIIC — Pittsburgh 
KGW-TV- Portland 
WPRO-TV- Providence 



KGO-TV-San Francisco 
KING-TV- 

Seattle-Tacoma 
KTVI-St. Louis 
WFLA-TV- 

Tampa-St. Petersburg 



16 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



4 JULY 1959 Both in New York and Chicago, reps have taken it as a hopeful sign for fall spot 

c«»yriibt iim radio that important agencies have invited them in to get their thinking on how the 

sponsor medium can be tooled to fit in with a particular client's marketing plan. 

publication* i no. This sort of rapport can't help but have a stimulating effect on the rep field. 

The one big yearning that reps have voiced for at least the past six months: Ways and 
means of weaning back those top-rank agencies — McCann-Erickson, Burnett, Compton 
— that have become completely tv-oriented as far as air media are concerned. 

What radio reps would like of such agencies is this: An opportunity to show them new 
ways of using and merchandising radio; to urge that the research that measures radio 
be applied creatively and imaginatively; to submit constructive concepts of radio as 
an efficient ingredient in an over-all advertising plan. 

Seller checks among Chrysler Corp. and General Motors agencies indicate that 
spot tv will be loaded with saturation campaigns from these sources in connection 
with the introduction this fall of the Valiant, Dart, and Corvair lines. 

The schedules for the lower-priced newcomers probably won't be firmed up until early 
August. But, in any event, from the impressions gained by air media's sales brigade in Detroit, 
the biggest slice of the ad melon will go to spot tv. 

The likely exception among the big three is Ford. It seems inclined to depend 
solely on network as the tv exploiter of its economy-version Falcon, with spot radio 
the saturation medium. 

In the hope of beating others to choice clearances, Burnett last week spelled out Kel- 
logg's wants for another 52-week go-round of its kid spot tv programing. 

The schedule — calling for three half-hours of Woody Woodpecker, Huckleberry Hound, 
and Superman — starts 29 September, and is generally headed for the same areas 
that carried the trio this past year. 

However, there may be some revisions in markets and stations. As a Burnett man put it : 
Markets have done a good job for Kellogg and stations that have a good solid mop- 
pet strip in the early evening will retain all three shows; other markets will be clipped 
to two shows or even one. 

National spot radio's big pepper-upper of the week: 

Armour's Dash Dog Food is putting $75,000 in 33 top markets for five weeks, 
starting 13 July. 

Of pointed significance : The buy comes out of an agency — FCB, Chicago^usual- 
ly regarded as overwhelmingly tv-oriented. (The product was recently taken over from 
Ayer. ) 

Also buying: Fresh California Bartlett Pears Advisory Board (Cunningham & 
Walsh, San Francisco), sizeable packages of announcements for four to seven weeks in 30 
markets. 

Spot as well as network tv will likely be the gainer from the additional money 
that Gillette is expected to spend on behalf of its $1.95 adjustable razor. 

The company already is spending between $18-20 million in tv plus a possible $1 
million for its d.j. programing in about 100 radio markets. 

sponsor • 4 JULY 1959 17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Both spot radio and NBC Radio have been enlisted by plastics trade groups via BBDO 
in their drive to warn mothers against letting small children come in contact with plastic bags. 

The buy is for 21 announcements a week over four weeks. List of spot markets: 
about 40. 



Another sign that tv is making a deep dent in the soft goods retailing field: 
Women's Wear Daily has started publishing a regular column dealing with the 

influence of tv, ad-wise and fashion-wise, on the wearing apparel field. 

The column will cover 1) what retailers and manufacturers in the field are promoting 

on tv 2) how successful the medium has been for them, and 3) how fashions shown on 

tv are influencing consumer demand. 



Despite the triple get-together of Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Holden, and Bryan Hous- 
ton, the trend among agencies to merge slowed considerably during the first half 
of 1959. 

Perhaps the turn of the economic tide for the better had something to do with 
it. In other words, there were fewer agencies, with clients looking for escape hatches. 

During the year's first half, only three mergers whose billings totaled $15 mil- 
lion or better apiece took place. They were: 

MERGED AGENCIES NEW NAMES BILLINGS 

Bryan Houston, Fletcher D. Richards, Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Holden $45 million 

Calkins & Holden 
Burke, Dowling & Adams, 

St. George & Keyes 
Cohen & Aleshire, Dowd, 

Redfield & Johnstone 



Adams & Keyes 

Cohen, Dowd & Aleshire 



16 million 



15 million 



E. 

The quest for new agency pastures by important advertisers the first six 
months of this year wasn't quite so pronounced, in terms of giant budget, as during 
the first half of 1958. 

You will recall that was the period of the twin migrations of Buick and Chrysler. 

Note how heavy investors in tv again predominate the following roster of ad- 
vertisers who rehoused their accounts this year: 



ADVERTISER 

Chase & Sanborn 

Dristan 

American Airlines 

Cluett, Peabody 

Playtex 

Nescafe 

Armour Grocery Div. 

Wildroot 

Hudson Paper 

Bristol-Myers' Ban 

Red Heart Dog Food 

Bissel Carpet Sweeper 

Northan Warren 

Manhattan Shirt 

Nucoa Margarine 

Regal Pale Brewing 

Norwich's Nebs 

* Covers all media 



FROM 
Compton 
Bryan Houston 
Lennen & Newell 
Young & Rubicam 
Reach, McClinton 
Bryan Houston 
N. W. Ayer 
BBDO 

Norman, C&K 
BBDO 

Campbell-Mithun 
Leo Burnett 
Doyle, Dane B 
Doner & Peck 
Guild, B&B 
Heintz & Co. 
Foote, Cone & B 



TO 

J. Walter Thompson 

Tatham-Laird 

Young & Rubicam 

Lennen & Newell 

Ted Bates 

Esty 

Foote, Cone & Belding 

Ted Bates 

Grey 

Ogilvy, Benson & M 

Tatham-Laird 

Frank E. Clinton 

DCS&S 

Daniel & Charles 

Dancer, F&S 

Lennen & Newell 

Cohen, Dowd & A 



ESTIMATED 

BUDGET* 
$8,000,000 

7,000,000 
6,000,000 
4,500,000 
4,000,000 
4,000,000 
3,500,000 
3,000,000 
2,000,000 
2,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 



18 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Some agencies are worried about a further weakening of product protection 

the coming season as a result of (1) the increased sales of minute participations in 
nighttime network tv shows, and (2) the rapid spread of the cross-plug. 

The concern is not only with keeping a 15-minute distance between out-and-out competi- 
tive products, but preventing kindred items (like a packaged deodorant and a de- 
odorant soap) from being adjacent to each other. 

Say the networks: We plan to keep the 15-minute separation rule in force — 
even if we have to insist that an alternate sponsor schedule the cross-plug in the middle 
of the program or the major sponsor surrender his closing billboard. 

CBS TV is contemplating another gesture to help affiliates meet the mounting 
demand from spot advertisers for daytime minutes. 

A third 60-second station break will be opened up at 3 p.m. — if the move meets 
with the approval of the sponsors of House Party, which comes between 2-2:30. In other 
words, there would be no break after that show, but there would be a minute after the 
succeeding program that replaces Jimmy Dean. 

Currently there are minute breaks at 12:30 and at 2 p.m. 

A realignment of product assignments for the account's four agencies could 
follow the current reorganization of Quaker Oats' advertising and sales operations. 

Two years of study by the consulting firm of Booz Allen & Hamilton brought about 
this basic recommendation: combining advertising and sales under the title of Advertis- 
ing and Merchandising Department, with new titles and responsibilities for ad people. 

There will be four divisions: 1) pet foods; 2) corn foods and Flako; 3) Aunt Jemima 
mixes; and 4) cereal groups. 

Quaker products are now spread out thus: JWT, pet foods, light cereals, and Aunt Je- 
mima; Clinton E. Frank, flour, Flako, institutional; John W. Shaw, corn foods, three easy 
mixes, specialties; Wherry, Baker, Til den, cereals. 

Those that turn against rock-and-roll can be as violent as its exponents. 

Take the announcement this week of KAVI, Rocky Ford, Col., that it is converting 
from rock-and-roll to straight "good family music." 

Said KAVI: (1) An r-and-r record will be broken over the air every 10 minutes 
until all 500 such records in the library are destroyed; (2) any staff announcer who 
plays a verboten record will be fired on the spot. 

Esty, agency for National Carbon's Prestone, has this explanation why Zerex 
(duPont) is going to put $600,000 in three specials on NBC TV this fall: Prestone 
had the biggest year ever in sales. 

Zerex's move (via BBDO) came after Prestone arranged to go all tv network this 
fall via a special on baseball the night before the World Series (NBC TV) ; two half-hours 
each of Sugarfoot and Cheyenne; and some shots of CBS TV News. 

The probable media losers in this battle for market dominance between the two giants: 
spot tv and print. Neither sponsor, however, was a heavy spender in those fields. 

Tv network gross time billings for May showed a 8.7% increase over the like 
month of 1958: All three networks this time doing a total of $52,085,557, as 
compared to $47,918,145 for May '58. 

The May '59 billings by network: ABC TV, $9,946,570, plus 17.3%; CBS TV, $22,464,- 
493, up 7.1%; NBC TV, $19,674,494, an increase of 6.5%. 

For the first four months, ABC TV is ahead by 18.7%; CBS TV, 6.2%; NBC TV. 7.4%. 

Aggregate billings for January through May by networks: ABC, $52,492,402; CBS, 
$110,759,141; NBC, $97,509,662. Total: $260,761,205. 

sponsor • 4 JULY 1959 19 



: 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



It could be that the daily hours of tv viewing per set have reached a peak and 

that a slight downward trend — no bigger than a man's hand right now — is on the way. 

Recent Nielsen monthly soundings on total tune-in averages have shown pretty much 
of a static condition compared to last year. In fact, the count for this April was 5.24 hours 
as compared to 5.36 hours for 1958. 

As further evidence of what recent Nielsen viewing reports may portend, note the 
average tune-in per minute for all U.S. tv homes by hours this April as compared to 
April 1958: 

APRIL 1959 AVG. APRIL 1958 AVG. 

9-10 a.m. 15.0 13.9 

10-11 a.m. 15.6 16.6 

11-12 noon 21.4 21.5 

Noon-1 p.m. 20.7 22.9 

2-3 p.m. 19.0 21.0 

3-4 p.m. 20.5 22.9 

4-5 p.m. 24.6 27.8 

5-6 p.m. 29.8 31.1 

6-7 p.m. 35.9 38.4 

7-8 p.m. 49.7 52.7 

8-9 p.m. 61.0 63.3 

9-10 p.m. 63.8 66.4 

10-11 p.m. 56 5 58.3 

11-12 midnight 34.8 37.2 

How effective is the "bandwagon" approach in advertising — claiming, for exam- 
ple, that your product is number one seller, or the oldest, etc.? 

Madison Avenue observers say that psychological research shows that the value 
of this technique is dubious unless you've got specific objectives such as: 

• In the case of gift products, impressing the recipient with the idea that the 
giver has shown good judgment. 

• If the advertiser isn't getting as much dealer support as his competitors, or 
point-of-sale support isn't what it might be, the bandwagon angle might be used to make the 
point that you're at a disadvantage when you don't play along with the leader. 

Spot tv and radio might as well face up to the fact that there isn't going to 
be any sharp change in their place on the national advertiser's totem pole soon. 

In other words, they (plus the newspapers) will go on getting their business in spas- 
modic chunks. 

National advertisers, with few exceptions, have become wedded to the philosophy 
that 1) a product image can be adequately transmitted via network tv or color 
print, and 2) that for sales action in the event of special or seasonal promotions, 
deals, and whatnot they can turn to the other media for concentrated flights. 

Agencies will tell you that this zigzag course is no more healthy for their economic well- 
being than it is for the stations'. Putting one of these fast promotions into the works often 
means drastic readjustments of personnel assignments, jacking up the cost of op- 
eration, and thinning down the margin of profit. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 10; 
Spot Buys, page 50; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 58; Washington Week, page 61; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 64; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 62. 

20 sponsor • 4 july 1959 



IT COMMUNICATES! 



It takes only one wave of a checkered flag to signal the winner as thousands of horsepower race down the 
straightaway. That's communication. And it takes only one word from WOOD-TV to send hundreds of thousands of 
WOODIanders racing straightaway to their stores. That's real communication. There's plenty of buying power, too 
in Western Michigan — where everybody is a WOODwatcher. Make your client a winner. Check Katz for details. 

WOOD-TV is first - morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday February '59 ARB Grand Rapids, Michigan 
WOOD-AM is first - morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday March '59 Pulse Grand Rapids - 5 county area 




WOOD 



AM 
TV 



WOODIand Center, 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 

WOOD-TV— NBC for Western and 
Central Michigan: Grand Rapids, 
Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon 
and Lansing. WOOD-Radio — NBC. 




- '~ n 



■- - "*• *• 



mm**,.. • 




RUNAWAY SALES 

SUCCESS 

ALL ACROSS U.S.A.! 



N 
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W 

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ORTH 

Detroit, St. Louis, 
Cleveland, Ft. Wayne! 

AST 

Boston, New Haven, 
Albany, Portland! 



EST 

Los Angeles, Denver, 
Seattle, Salt Lake City! 



OUTH 

Atlanta, New Orleans, 
Miami, Richmond! 



Have your local ITC represen- 
tative give you the news of how 
BRAVE STALLION can in- 
crease audiences in your market. 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



488 Madison Ave. -N.Y. 22 -PLaza 5-2100 

22 



by John E. McMillin 




Commercial 
commentary 



More teeth for the tv code 

The recent news that 13 additional tv stations 
have had their TV Code Seals revoked for carry- 
ing Preparation H commercials may have been 
a bomb in the broadcasting business. But I 
doubt if it created more than a limpid ripple 
among admen and the general public. 

This. I think, is too bad. 

In turning thumbs down on advertising for 
Whitehall Pharmacal's hemorrhoid remedy, the members of NAB's 
TV Code Committee acted with a courage and steadfastness all too 
rare among industry trade practice groups. 

They deserve applause, and I hope they get it. 

But the sad fact remains that few people have ever seen the Tv 
Code Seal on their home screens and fewer still understand what it is 
or means. Furthermore. I'll lay you ten to one that not more than a 
handful of agency or advertising men have ever bothered to read 
through the provisions of the TV Code. 

Actually it is a remarkable document. I don't envy anyone who is 
handed the job of drafting a code of fair practices for anything, 
especially any phase of the advertising business. 

It is almost an open invitation to be prissy, pompous and sancti- 
monious, or absurdly two-faced and weasling. And the NAB's TV 
Code doesn't wholly escape these common faults. 

There are places where it sounds a little like a lavender-scented 
spinster of perennially unchallenged virginity reading a bifocal lec- 
ture to a smutty-faced, teen-aged boy. 

I strenuously object, for instance, to the anodyne statement that 
"religious programs should place emphasis on broad religious truths, 
excluding the presentation of controversial or partisan views not di- 
rectly or necessarily related to religion or morality." 

I seriously question whether the cause of religion, or of the Re- 
public, is best served by such a safe, emasculated approach. 

Definite and positive provisions 

If, however, you can overlook these occasional lapses in taste and 
virility (they're almost an occupational disease among all code-draft- 
ing lawyers) you will find in the NAB's TV Code a wealth of posi- 
tive, definite, practical and courageously idealistic provisions. 

The Code is at its best, I feel, in defining those types of advertising 
which are not acceptable to Code subscribers (the three tv networks 
and more than half of all tv stations I. 

I believe these provisions should be read and studied by every ad 
manager, account executive and media man who deals in tv. 

You will get some surprises, I think. 

Undoubtedly you realize that the advertising of hard liquor is 
verboten on tv. But did you know that 270 tv stations subscribing to 
the Code have voluntarily agreed not to carry a wide variety of other 
types of copy? 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



Commercial commentary continued 



For instance, on these stations you cannot advertise tip sheets, race 
track publications, lotteries, fortune telling, astrology, palmistry or 
character reading. 

You cannot advertise institutions or enterprises which in their of- 
fers of instruction, imply promises of employment. 

You cannot (under a Code Interpretation dated 7 June 1956) ad- 
vertise hemorrhoid remedies, products used in connection with femi- 
nine hygiene, or other products which are "generally regarded as 
unsuitable conversational topics in mixed social groups." 

The Code forbids the use of "bait switch" advertising, the "pitch- 
man technique" in copy, and the portrayal of doctors, dentists, or 
nurses, except by accredited members of these professions. 

Under the Code you may not run contests based on chance rather 
than skill, or offer premiums which appeal to superstition on the 
basis of their "luck bearing" powers. 

Stations subscribing to the Code have spelled out for them in exact 
detail the amount of time which mav be devoted to commercials in 
all types of programs from five to 120 minutes in length, with stricter 
limitations on "AA" and "A" time periods. 

There are a number of other Code provisions which deserve stud\ 
and respect. 

Why advertisers should support it 

I don't think, of course, that the TV Code is perfect as it now 
stands, and I doubt if you will when you read it. 

In certain areas it obviously does not yet go far enough. Some of 
its provisions need to be amended, expanded or rephrased, as I am 
sure they will be. 

But taken as a whole, the NAB's TV Code does emerge as an in- 
telligent, honest effort by honorable men to draw up a decent set of 
ground rules for a turblent young industry which has unique social 
responsibilities. 

It is a better code, better drawn, better accepted and better policed 
than any yet devised by such older, prouder media as magazines and 
newspapers. 

As such it deserves. I think, far more attention and support from 
agencies and advertisers than it has yet received. 

If advertising men are sincerely concerned about their industry's 
public image (and I think the best of them are) then they should 
support the TV Code both in principle and in practice. 

Endorsements in principle can be made through the machinerj of 
the ANA and the 4A's, and I hope that these groups will work closel) 
and sympathetically with the members of the NAB's Code Committee 
in an effort to get more understanding and support for Code provi- 
sions. 

As to endorsements in practice, these are simple matters for every 
agency and advertiser buying tv time. All that is needed is an in- 
sistence by managements, and by ad managers and time buyers, that 
all stations appearing on their spot tv lineups be TV Code subscribers. 

It is certainly in their best interests to do this. As Douu Smith, 
advertising and merchandising director of S. C. Johnson pointed out 
recently, "Tv is one of the greatest assets which we. the advertisers 
possess. We must be careful to respect, maintain and even cherish 
it." 

The support of a decent, honorable TV Code is one of the finest 
ways of cherishing the tv medium, and insuring its future. ^ 



Hoodoo 5k/ Ar»a in Oregon 



Nearly ]/4 of Oregon's 
buying families watch 

KVAL-TV 

KPIC-TV 



The only clear-picture in the 
Eugene - Springfield - Roseburg 
market is on KVAL-KPIC. One 
order to your Hollingbery man 
or Art Moore and Associates 
(Portland-Seattle' covers both 
stations. 



KVAL-TV fugene 

NBC Affiliate Channel 



IE 



v 



KPIC-TV Roseburg • Channel 4 

Satsllile 



For 35 Years 
No. 1 in the 

Roanoke 

Market! 

WDBJ has been on the air in 
Roanoke, Virginia continuously 
since 1924. In every audience 
survey ever made in those 35 
years, WDBJ has always 
proved to be first in coverage 
and audience. 

W3 look forward to serving 
even better in the future our 
long- list of loyal national ad- 
vertisers who demand the best 
in radio promotion. 

Ray P. Jordan, 

V. P. Broadcasting 

Times-World Corporation 




WDBJ 



CBS RADIO 



Roanoke, Virginia 



960 Kc. 
94.9 Mc. 



5000 watts 
14,000 watts 



j-y. PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC, 

National Rfprtitntati»ts i 



SPONSOR 



4 JULY 1959 



25 




Hooray For un-Forira/ 



A "formula" radio station is definitely what WBT ain't. 

WBT's programming is varied — creative — responsible. 

Popular, too. Pulse surveyed the 25 county Charlotte area 
• just a portion of WBT's Basic Service Area I and found a 92% 
WBT lead mornings, 69% afternoons and 123% at night.* 



Grab some WBT availabilities so you'll have something to 
cheer about in the nation's 24th largest radio market.* 
Call CBS Radio Spot Sales for details. 



Pulse 25 county area 1959 I March I 
A. C. Nielsen Co. 



WBT CHaflPTTe 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 
JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



49th and 
Madison 



24 



Not first-born 

1 note with interest \ our "Sponsor 
Speaks" item on "Radio Says It's a 
Boy" in the 20 June issue of sponsor. 

That is a fine service KMOX ren- 
dered during the newspaper hlackout, 
but in the light of your statement 
"As far as we know this is the first 
time that radio has taken over this 
happy chore of public service" — I 
hasten to advise that for over 10 
years WIS has saluted the newest citi- 
zens of the area via the well estab- 
lished "Stork Call" — presented every 
morning as a key segment of the WIS 
Morning Show. Listener interest and 
response has been very strong through 
the years. 

Oh yes, the sponsor likes this pub- 
lic service vehicle, too! 

W. Frank Harden 
man. dir., WIS 
Columbia. S. C. 



• SPONSOR also heard frors KLIK. Jefferson 
Cilv. Mo.; WTTN. Watertoun. Wis.: WSVA. 
Harrisonhurg; KCHA. Charles Citv. la.; W-DOG. 
St. Clair. Mich.; WADS. Ansonia. Conn.; WGTC, 
Greenville, N. C. ; WJOL. Joliet; and WKMC, 
Roaring Spring, Pa. We ran only say we're 
glad we were wrong ami thai so many of you 
are on hand to welcome new listeners—and new 
SPONSOR readers. 



Local reps important, too! 
Your issue of 23 May contained a 
st.ory about Minneapolis as one of the 
major advertising centers. 

Mention was made therein of the 
fact that no station reps maintained 
offices here. While we realize this re- 
ferred to national reps, we would like 
to clarify the picture by calling your 
attention to the existence of three rep 
firms in Minneapolis, of which ours 
has the largest station list. 

Minneapolis has indeed increased 
in advertising importance. TvB said 
two years ago, that 5 % of all tele- 
vision expenditures came from Min- 
neapolis Agencies and clients. 

We're glad you acknowledged our 
market's importance, hut please, don't 
again forget the fact that regional 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



WCTV S»„es 
Another Problem 
for an Ad Manager 




Tom had the sales manager on 
his neck. 




Sales were too spotty; expen- 
sive in big markets, non- 
existent in-between. 






Blair TV Associates said why 
not fill in these gaps with cov- 
eraae like that of WCTV? 




Substantially unduplicated 
coverage brought quick re- 
sults, profitable sales. 




Tom even relaxes 
occasionally. 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasville 



for North Fla. and South Ca. 

John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Stations 



reps plaj a most important part in 

ibis mark' I. 

Harrj S. Hyetl 
Radio-Tv Station Reps. 

Minneapolis 



Good radio copy 

1 was extremelj pleased to see the 
article "Why Poor Cop) Robs Radio" 

in the Id \Ia\ issue of SPONSOR. 

Here at WGMS we have found that 
good promotional cop) will reap rich 
rewards for a radio station as well as 
for its clients. We have noticed that 
this is particular!) true when we pro- 
mote subscriptions to our monthly 
program guide. A change in copy 
emphasizing a new feature of the 
guide never fails to bring a large 
spurt of subscriptions. 

A hard look at promotional copy 
should be of as much concern to a 
radio station which sells air time as 
to sponsors selling Ruicks. Ben-Gay 
or Borden's Instant Coffee. 
Sol Hurwitz 
dir. of prom.. It GMS 
Washington, I). C. 



Thanks for the write-up 
I was quite impressed with the arti- 
cle, "How 'David' fought Lestoil 
'Goliath' with TV" in your 30 May 
issue of SPONSOR magazine. Our ad- 
vertising agency is a subscriber to 
your magazine and they brought the 
article to my attention. I am sure 
thai this national publicity will be 
of great value in helping us to keep 
moving ahead with this great product 
of ours. 

Fred B. Spinney 
distributor 
Westfield, Mass. 



Music, maestro . . . 
We, at Good Music Broadcasters, 
would personally like to take this op- 
portunity to thank the editorial stall 
of SPONSOR, for the excellent article 
that was featured in the 13 June is- 
sue. '" \ new bead ol steam lor fm. 

We aie the oldest classical music 
representative in the radio business: 
and we feel that your article on fm 
and quality audiences without any 
doubt did the "good music " concept 
justice. 

Herbert E. Groskin 

nail sales tngr. 

Good Music Broadcasters Inc. 
Sew York 



KBOX 



the 



HOTTEST 

thing in the DALLAS 
MARKET- from 9th Place 
to 2nd Place in ONLY 
9 months 




BUY Radio when you buy medio BUY Bolobon 
when you buy radio BUY KBOX when you 
buy Dallas and you BUY the people who BUY 

THE BALABAN STATIONS 

in tempo with the times 

WIL KBOX WRIT 

St. louit Dallas Milwaukee 

JOHN F. BOX, Jr., Managing Director 

EDWARD T. HUNT. General Mar. 

Sold Nationally by 
Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. 



SPONSOR 



I .1 1 ly 1959 










Channel 3 is First By All Surveys 



Here are the latest Memphis Surveys, showing leads in 
competitively-rated quarter hours, sign-on to sign-off, 
Sunday thru Saturday: 







A.R.B. 




Pulse 


Nielsen 




Apr 


. 17-May 14, 
(Metro Area) 


•59 


Feb. '59 
(Metro Area) 


Mar. -Apr. 195 
(Station Area) 


WRBC-TV 

Sta. B 

Sta. C 




250 

80 
68 




251 

109 

19 


263 
72 
53 



WREC-TV 

Channel 3 Memphis 



No wonder in Memphis 
they say "There's more 
to see on Channel 3." 
WREC-TV's combina- 
tion of the finest local 
programming and the 
great shows of the CBS 
Television network de- 
liver the greatest au- 
dience in the Mid-South 
area. See your Katz man 
soon. 




26 



Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



SPONSOR 



4 | U L Y 19 5 9 




MERLE JONES, pres., CBS Tv Stations, tells sponsors and agencies CBS affili- 
ates beat out other network- and independent competition in impact, popularity with viewers 



CBS tv research brews up a storm 



^ CBS o&o study claims that net-affiliated tv outlets 
have better station image, more commercial effectiveness 

^ Spokesmen for tv indies dispute findings, tactics 
of New York-Los Angeles qualitative audience study 



#% piece of solemn motivational re- 
search, introduced by CBS and shown 
this week to agencies and advertisers 
all over the country, has exploded like 
an unwanted hydrogen bomb, and 
provoked loud indignant protests as 
fragments began to hit the other net- 
works and — most particularly — the 
independent non-affiliated tv stations. 
Why? Because a two-market study 
conducted in New York and Los 



Angeles by the Institute for Motiva- 
tional Research. Inc. I headed bv Dr. 
Ernest Dichter) and Market Plan- 
ning Corp. la McCann-Erickson affili- 
ate I contends thai net affiliated sta- 
tions have it all over the indies in 
creating a station image and in es- 
tablishing a productive commercial 
climate and that CBS o&o stations 
and affiliates beat ABC and NBC 
affiliates hands down in doing the 



same job in identification. 

The studv. commissioned 1>\ the 
CBS Television Stations division, has 
drawn cross fire from the indepen- 
dents. But the other networks, who 
reap some partial rewards from the 
qualitative survey, continue at this 
point aloof . . . and silent. \l spon- 
sor's presstime neither \BC nor NBC 
had am official or unofficial com- 
ment to make about the CBS findings. 

The skirmish began last week when 
Merle Jones, president of the stations 
division, and his executive stafi 
kicked off the slide presentation in 
New ^ oik. 

Their conclusions: 

• f ntil now. do one knew tor sure 
whether each tv station had it- own 
unique personality. I he new stu 



SPONSOR 



1 .ILLY 1059 



establishes this fact, providing what 
Mr. Jones calls a "breakthrough" in 
tv research. 

• Viewers, in differentiating 
among stations, develop images and 
tend to respond more favorably to 
commercials and clients who are rep- 
resented b\ the favored image station. 

• The favored station in the two 
test cities was the CBS o&o outlet, in 
each case channel 2, by a wide mar- 
gin, competing against ABC and NBC 
o&o's on channels 4 and 7 respectively 
in both New York and Los Angeles, 
and against three independent or 
non-affiliated stations in each city. 

The logical progression, as CBS 
puts it: Viewers associate CBS-owned 
tv stations with authority, prestige 
and confidence. The viewer looks to 
these stations for important and well- 
balanced programing. Therefore the 
audience pays stricter attention to 
CBS-owned tv stations commercials 
anticipating quality product adver- 
tisements. The sponors thus receive 
maximum attention and response. 

How is the industry reacting to 
these assertions? 

Typical of the agency point of view 
is the reaction of Peter M. Bardach. 
senior media buyer at Foote, Cone & 
Belding. New York, who commends 
CBS for performing "this genuine 
service to the industry." But he sees 
"no significant effect on advertising 
planning" as a result. 

"In general, the conclusions reaf- 
firm what the agency has always 
thought — there is a certain magic 
something about network call letters." 

"But media decisions," says Mr. 
Bardach, "will continue to be based 
more on the efficiency of a specific 
tv opportunity." 

For the study, eight qualitative 
questions were asked in personal in- 
terviews with 1.200 persons in New 
York and Los Angeles. Here are the 
word-for-word queries and the re- 
sponses. 

A. The respondent is handed a 
picture of a family watching tv. 

"These people are talking about tv 
programs and tv stations. You hap- 
pen to pass by and overhear some of 
their comments. Id like you to guess, 
from reading each comment, what tv 
channel they are referring to. Which 




TV 



CLARK GEORGE, v.p.-genl. mgr., KNXT, 
L.A., helped preview Station Image Study 



• STATION PERSONALITY. For the first time, it's proved a 
tv station has a personality. The stronger and better personality is that 
oj a net affiliate, particularly a CBS outlet. More than half the viewers 
surveyed gave the nod to the CBS station as favorite source of shows 



• IMAGE EFFECT. The station image or personality has a pro- 
found effect on an advertiser's campaign. Sponsors enjoy a better cli- 
mate for commercial response on a net affiliated station, particularly 
with CBS outlet, than with indie. Indies inspire far less confidence 



• COMMERCIAL QUALITY. A company slipping in sales, des- 
perately trying to regain its position by loud, big promises, is most likely 
to advertise on an indie. But one which advertises an excellent product 
and has a reputation for honesty, reliability, is most likely to be on CBS 



• PROJECTIVE TESTS. Six qualitative questions are answered 
in the CBS report, More Than Meets the Eye, giving the image of a tv 
station in the eyes of community it serves. This intangible factor docu- 
ments what buyers have long sensed but could never definitely prove 



• SURVEY MARKETS. Personal surveys were conducted among 
] ,200 viewers in Los Angeles and New York where conditions are ideal 
and identical for the toughest possible lest. In each market each of the 
three nets owns a station and competes with four non-net independents 



28 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



NON-NET 
KTTV 




JOHN R. VRBA, v.p. for sales, KTTV, 
L.A., gives indie view of the CBS claims 



• STATION PERSONALITY. A station has a trade personality 

but not a consumer one. There's no channel loyalty, or ice wouldn't 
have such dial-switching. KTTV surveys shoiv consistently that be- 
tween 10' < and 50% of the viewers never know channel or call letters 



• IMAGE EFFECT. Only two factors affect an advertiser's mes- 
sage: the show which attracts the viewer to begin with and the content 
oj his commercial. The type of audience for any station in a market is 
about the same. Advertisers want favorable cost, big reach and sales 



• COMMERCIAL QUALITY. The same national and regional ad- 
rertisers use both net and indie stations, and their commercials are the 
same. Many indies have standards of acceptance as high or higher than 
net affiliates: another reason we resent all indies being lumped together 



• PROJECTIVE TESTS. The generalized results are too all- 
inclusive and should be broken down. And the independents are lumped 
together in a group though they are very different. The questions are 
leading ones, phrased to allow viewer to give widest possible answer 



• SURVEY MARKETS. New York and Los Angeles are far from 
identical, except superficially. CBS in L.A. gets an over-all audience 
share of 28% to 30%, in New York from 35* < to 40%. ) et in other 
markets CBS gets far rougher competition from indies and other nets 



channel are the) most likel) talking 
about ?" 

1. "They have more worthwhile 
programs which I really look forward 

to. and watch u ilh interest." 

Channel 2. .12', ; channel 1. 2!!', ; 
channel 7. <">', ; all others combined, 

12',. 

2. "They seem to have more pro- 
grams that the whole family can en- 
joy together." 

Channel 2. I,'!', : channel I. 27', : 
channel 7. 14',: all oilier-. II',. 

3. "/ have seen their programs 
when someone ehe in the house turns 
l hem on — / only half -watch them. 
They don't hold my interest." 

Channel 2, 4%, channel I. 3%; 
channel 7. li!', ; all others. 75%. 

4. "1 have a feeling of greater 
confidence, more trust in the products 
1 see advertised on that station." 

Channel 2. 53', : channel \. 30%; 
channel 7. ')', : all other-. !!',. 

B. "This laniiK is watching i\. 
\ commercial has just appeared on 

the screen, members of the family 
are commenting." 

5. Father: "That is a tine product, 
made by a reliable company." 

Mother: "I'd like to try it next 
lime." 

"What channel are the) watch- 
ing . 

Channel 2. 51ft : channel 1. 31', : 
channel 7. !!', : all others, In',. 

C. "Suppose you read the follow- 
ing comments in the television re- 
view column of your local newspaper. 
Which channel would you guess was 
(he most likel) being referred to?" 

6. "The people at that channel 
seem to understand best the average 
American family's desire for a bal- 
anced variety of programs — for each 
individual in the family, and for all 
of our different moods — from fur. 
and entertainment to neus and infor- 
mation." 

Channel 2. 52', : channel I. 2:1', : 
channel 7. 10', : all others, 10',. 

D. "The following are descrip- 
tions of various companies that ad- 
vertise on t\. I want you to guess, 
from the description, the tv station 
on which you are most likel) t< 
their advertising." 

i Please turn to page 53 ' 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



29 




DUKES OF KENT: At Robert Swanson Productions in N.Y., Bud Mackenzie, Bob Swanson, 
Bernie Knee and Jack Keller rehearse new Dick Adler radio commercial for Kent Cigarettes. A 
pop disk with vocals by Pat Suzuki on Phipp's label came out simultaneous with radio campaign 



100%, is evenly spread in both urban 
and rural areas. To an industry such 
as cigarettes with an estimated mar- 
ket of 60 million persons, this is im- 
portant. 

• Flexibility. Spot radio offers the 
opportunity to pick markets in line 
with marketing strategies. In the 
cigarette business this is vital since 
the last 10 years has seen it grow 
more complex than ever through the 
introduction of king-size and filter 
tips. There are areas where filters 
dominate the share of market and 
others where regulars outsell. The 
cigarette marketing man can follow 



^!!ijiii:.:iiii!:;:iir';iii:,:!; :i: i :!!!\ji ■!! :,hiii::,ii iiLiMiiiiiiiiiiiur iiiiii 



RADIO FARES 



Where there is smoke 
there's sure to be radio 



COMPANY 



AMERICAN TOBACCO 



Top five in $4 billion cigarette industry invested 
million in spot radio during first quarter of 1959 

^ There are many reasons: flexibility, circulation and 
impact. Biggest reason is they cannot afford not to 



I 



t came to light this week when 
Radio Advertising Bureau released 
its list of spot radio's top 20 clients 
during the first quarter of 1959. 

Three of the top five customers are 
cigarette accounts. 

Five of the top 10 spenders are 
cigarettes. 

A cigarette advertiser is at the very 
head of the list. — Liggett & Myers. 

In third position, after Thomas 
Leeming and ahead of Ford, is R. J. 
Reynolds Tobacco Co. Fifth and 
sixth top ranking users of spot radio 
time are P. Lorillard and American 
Tobacco respectively. Philip Morris 
is No. 10. 

These five manufacturers of cigar- 
ettes accounted for an estimated $1 

30 



million investment in spot radio ad- 
\ertising between 1 January and 31 
March. 

By product category in RAB's 
'Top 20," tobaccos ranked second, 
topped only by drugs, traditionally 
heavy spenders during the season of 
colds and virus. 

At the same time, network radio 
has been getting a healthy play from 
at least three of the cigarette titans. 

What is behind this cigarette-radio 
romance? 

"Radio has been important to cig- 
arettes for a long time," a tobacco 
client executive told sponsor. The 
reasons are obvious: 

• Circulation at low cost. Radio 
saturation of U.S. homes is close to 



LIGGETT & MYERS 



P. LORILLARD 



R. J. REYNOLDS 



PHILIP MORRIS 



BROWN & WILLIAMSON 



Source: *RAB data. net. **TvB data, gro! 



.i|i'.;i" .M! .'II' JLiir ;|!::i'':NI' ,r III ;r,l' Mill!:! 
SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



these sales trends with radio, can also 
use the medium in testing new 
hrands. (Some of Philip Morris' first 
quarter spot radio investment of close 
to $400,000, for example, is going to 
West Coast radio stations in a test of 
Mayfield, a new filter-menthol cigar- 
ette). 

• Atmosphere. The appeal of ra- 
dio and the appeal of cigarettes have 
much in common — relaxation and en- 
joyment. Psychologically, the me- 
dium and the product advertised are 
a happy mating. 

• Brand loyalty. Radio research 
has pretty well established the medi- 



um as a direct pipeline to the teen- 
agers. Since they will be tomorrow's 
smokers I if they're not alread) smok- 
ing I. radio affords the cigarette com- 
panies a chance to get in early and 
establish long-lasting brand prefer- 
ences. 

• Special uses: Some cigarette 
manufacturers have found special 
uses for spot radio to improve pub- 
lic relations. A good example of this 
is Philip Morris which sponsors 
many sports events and public service 
programs on radio stations in the vi- 
cinity of its Richmond, Va., plant. 
This fall, through the whole south- 



ern tobacco-growing area, Philip 
Morris will sponsor on spot radio the 
football games of the Washington 
Redskins. 

While all the foregoing arc part 
of the strateg\ behind tobacco's hea\ \ 
buying of radio time, there is a sin- 
gle, simple reason which perhaps 
dominates all others: In the continu- 
ing fight for sales, no major cigar- 
ette can afford not to use radio. The 
stakes in this SI billion annual busi- 
ness are too big to risk the gamble. 

Cigarettes share the same problems 
as many low-cost, package goods. 
I Please turn to page 7 I I 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiii minimi iiiiiiiiimiiimmiiiimiiiiimiiiii iiimiiiiu ^ m! m: : ' :;i^m:ii!r :im..^\mi m: I,!, ii.-iiii ,iir :^ i: 1 ^i 11- ;:, :; ■ :^- j i i m n mm mini m i 



WELL IN THE TOP CIGARETTE ADVERTISING BUDGETS 



BRANDS 

(by rank in 

radio spending ) 



AGENCIES 



FIRST QUARTER 1959 
SPOT RADIO' SPOT TV 



TOTAL 1958 
SPOT RADIO SPOT TV^ 



Pall Mall 
Herbert Tareyton 
Lucky Strike 
Hit P 'trade 



SSC&B 

GUMBINNER 
BBDO 
BBDO 



$596,792 



$910,300 $4,600,000 



$3,018,150 



L&M 

Chesterfield 
Oasis 



DFS 

Mc-E 

Mc-E 



1,440,221 



987,700 2,700,000 



L,865,830 



Kent 

Old Golds 

Newport 



L&N 
L&N 
L&N 



650,973 



1,352,700 1,200.000 



().717.4.")U 



Camel 
If inston 
Salem 



ESTY 
ESTY 
ESTY 



898,063 



633,500 4.700.000 



2,434,260 



Philip Morris 
Parliament 
Mayfield 
Marlboro 



BURNETT 
B&B 

BURNETT 
BURNETT 



394.335 



1,289,900 



No radio 
figures 



4,066,710 



I iceroy 

Kool 

Raleigh 



BATES 
BATES 
KM&J 



10.754 



2,278,700 



No radio 

figures 



9,413,530 



ilium '.. 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



31 




OLD AD APPROACH featured price concessions and gimmicks. Ladd Ford's Gil Hile (I) 
and John Carlini are cutting down on these to emphasize budget-type pitch shown opposite page 



^ Windshield price posting required by law takes zing 
out of traditional price pitch for most car dealers 

^ So, many dealers, like Ladd Ford in Los Angeles, are 
switching to budget plan selling, most effective on tv 



1 he Sunday punch in car dealer 
copy, of course, has always been 
price. Any copy strategist could tell 
an inviting comparison story, shifting 
into high or low at will. But a gov- 
ernment ruling has put a kink in that 
time-honored approach. 

These days, anyone contemplating 
purchase of a new car is well aware 
that the law requires posting of prices 
on the windshield, and it's no easy 
job to whip him into a storm of en- 
thusiasm over what he knows is a 
foregone conclusion. 

The result is that enterprising car 
dealers are going in for advertising 
copy that reads more like a refresher 
course in high school math than the 
sort of hoopla that once engaged the 
customer. An example is the young 
man in the picture at left who gives a 
veritable course of instruction on 
family budgeting during his 60 and 
90 minutes on camera, complete with 
chalk, blackboard and equations that 
even have vague earmarks of chemi- 
cal formulas. 

Gil Hile is co-manager with John 
Carlini of Ladd Ford in Venice, a Los 
Angeles suburb. Both are fresh ex- 
amples of the budding crop of tv 
"profs." Their boss put them on tv 
for the first time last October. San- 
ford Ladd went into television to do 
what he could no longer do in print 
advertising: make a primer on bud- 
get plans understandable, appetizing 
and convincing. 

Ladd knew that the customary path 
of interruptions in vintage movies 
weren't going to do the entire job for 
him, though this sort of buy did 
prove to deliver the weekend impact 
he needed in terms of impulse, com- 
mercial length and frequency. To 
compound these advantages, he went 
for full sponsorship of a weekend 
movie on KTLA, Los Angeles, in Oc- 
tober, adding another one on KTTV 
in December. 

During the week, however, he 
needed some attractive window dress- 
ing for his budgeting chalk talks. 
Adult, family appeal was another 
quality he was looking for in his 
weekday buy. 



32 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



Solution : an across - the - board 
nighttime tv program called Let s 
Dance on KABC-TV which involved 
a running dance contest complete 
with well-known personality (Al Jar- 
vis) and judging panel featuring 
some entertainment names. 

He began with three 60-second par- 
ticipations per week in November. 
As the commercials took hold — and 
Hile and Carlini became at home 
with the chalk — he upped the buy to 
five nights (and seven commercials) 
per week at a cost of $3,000 a month 
— just equal to what he was spending 
for his weekend movies. 

A typical Ladd commercial con- 
tains basically three elements: 

• Plain business facts. Because the 
facts were impressive. Ladd copy got 



into figures right off the bat: "In just 
2 1 -2 short months Ladd Ford has 
jumped from last place to 5th in sales, 
an increase of more than 500' < . . . ' 

• The familiar strains. As view- 
ers came to know what to expect in a 
Ladd commercial. Ladd found that 
he could eliminate most of the cus- 
tomarv trimmings. After glancing 
off a few 7 of the stand-bys ("No mat- 
ter how you figure it — price, trade al- 
lowance, down payment, terms — Ladd 
Ford is giving the absolute best 
deal' l . cop\ gets down to business: 

• The chalk talk. "One reason for 
our tremendous increase in volume is 
the Ladd Ford family Budget Plan 
of Financing. Over 12 different plans 
— each one designed to solve a dif- 
ferent type of problem. (PAN TO 



blackboard) Let me give you jusl 
one specific example <>! how easj 
it is to own a new Ford at Ladd 
Ford in Venice. . . . 

• Windup. After the chalk talk. 
cop\ winds up with slogan ("Ladd 
prices are low prices • ■ address slide, 
hours ( 10 p.m. every night, including 
Sunda\ s I . 

That's the strategy. Has i( worked.' 
"There can be no doubt about the re- 
sults of the television campaign. 
Ladd sa\s. "In July. 1958 before the 
use of tv we sold a total of 31 cars. 
In January. 1959 we sold 1 13. The 
difference between these figures rep- 
resents a gross profit of $35,000. \nd 
the percentage of car sales due to the 
Jarvis program is at least 1(1', of 
our total sales." ^ 



CHALK TALK is new copy technique aimed at capturing viewer once lured by price hoopla. Here, Hile guides viewer through one of 12 
"family budget plans" which are meat of new copy formula. Classroom-like atmosphere of commercials requires tv vehicle with plenty of splash 





Look! franks with an i 



thanks 



^ Peet Packing Co. wanted 'national' image to make 
gains over national, regional competition in Michigan 

^ Network personality used in local strips won firm 
56% identification as national brand, 44% sales hike 



N SAGINAW, MICH, 

ational brand competition is an 
ever-present thorn in the side of a 
regional advertiser. One way of 
countering the problem is to become 
intensely local in your approach, 
trading on loyalties and tastes. The 
other is to become, as far as the 
consumer can discern, "national." 
The Peet Packing Co. and its 
agency. Parker Advertising, both felt 
that the competitive picture in Michi- 
gan didn't leave a meat packer much 
choice over which way to swing. 



"Michigan is subject to all the na- 
tional competition. " says agency 
president Jack Parker, "plus about 
six other regional packers." 

While Peet claims sales leadership 
over the regional competition, it 
decided the way to increase its lead 
and inch up on the big boys was to 
acquire a "national" look. Its adver- 
tising pattern up to four years ago 
had been sufficiently sporadic to per- 
mit such a revamping, but the big 
question was a monetary one. 

In 1954 and through most of '55, 



Peet had bean using minute radio 
spots and, for holiday and special 
pushes, I.D.'s on television. Obvi- 
ously, a budget tailored to this cover- 
age would be hard put to creating a 
Swift or Armour in anyone's mind 
overnight. 

And yet this is virtually what Peet 
has done in Michigan. The primary 
ingredients: 

• A personality borrowed from 
network radio. 

• A "network" of radio stations 
with the utmost in local flexibility. 

The borrowed network figure: Ted 
Malone. whose long stint as an ABC 
personality makes his name a famil- 
iar, national one. Parker knew 
Malone from the war years when 
they both served as overseas cor- 
respondents for ABC. 

The "network" was less than half 
its present size when Parker bought 



NETWORK PERSONALITY (Ted Malone) gives national flavor to Michigan meat packer but merchandising is local. Here, he visits Peer 




^wm^ 4 ^^ 



to radio 



daily five-minute strips on nine Mich- 
igan stations. He filled them with a 
show taped and produced by Malone 
in New York for exclusive use in the 
Peet Michigan markets. Malone de- 
livered and integrated Peet commer- 
cials into the show, which began its 
39-week test in November, 1955. 

The long-range character of the 
experiment grew out of Parker's own 
philosophy that "a program cannot 
build any kind of an audience in a 
limited time. A minimum of 26 
weeks is required.'' Parker feels, "for 
a valid testing of a show's potential. 
It has to catch on and build audi- 
ence loyalty. 

"We bought between the hours of 
7 and 9 a.m. in each market," Parker 
explains. "Our preference was for 
7:55 and 8:55 a.m. time slots. Our 
prime target: the housewife and the 
commuter." 

This pattern still applies, though 
the number of markets has increased 
to 20 and stations are bought on a 
firm 52-week basis. As markets were 
added, the Malone show became the 
framework around which the com- 
pany's entire advertising was built 
and merchandised. 

Here is how the show is integrated 
with other advertising: 

• Newspapers. One full page ROP 
on the first Wednesday of each 
month in nine Michigan dailies. 
Malone is often featured in the ads. 
and a good portion of each one is 
devoted to a generous plug for the 
show. 

• Trade papers. One ad per month 
appears in two Michigan food trade 
journals: Grocer's Spotlight and 
Michigan Food News. These trade 
ads merchandise the daily radio show 
as well as the monthly newspaper ad. 

• House organ. A monthly feature 
under Malone's byline appears in 
Farmer Peet's Almanac, which goes 
to 6,000 dealers and employees 
throughout the state. 

"But Ted himself is probably the 
most important merchandising vehi- 
cle for Peet products," says Parker. 
"Several times each year he visits 
Michigan for personal appearances." 

"So integrated has Malone become 
in Michigan life," says Parker, "that 
I Please turn to page 73 ) 




SPECIAL PROGRAMS by WAPI-TV and radio, Birmingham, attracted 3,000 visitors opening 
day to these Good Houseleeeping-Kingsberry prefabricated home exhibits in Birmingham suburb 



LOCAL RADIO/TV SELLS 
PREFABRICATED HOUSES 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



^Coordinated television and radio 
programs using local personalities 
proved effective recently in drawing 
large crowds to see an exhibit of pre- 
fabricated homes in Birmingham. 
Alabama. 

WAPI-TV and WAPI radio. Bir- 
mingham, had approached The Home 
Insulation Co. with regard to a cam- 
paign for their LFI prefabricated 
houses. The air media promotion 
was part of a nation-wide campaign 
for Good Housekeeping-Kingsberry 
homes. 

Vincent Mazzara. the local LFI 
dealer, asked Everett Holle of WAPI- 
TV to produce two 30-minute tv 
shows and several five-minute radio 
programs. Mr. Holle, a well known 
local tv personality, also starred in all 
of the shows. Another star in the 
programs was Bette Lee, also well- 
known to local radio listeners. 

The station filmed much location 
footage of the homes and their fur- 
nishings for the tv shows. On radio, 
a conversational tone was used to 
provide detailed information on the 
prefabricated units. 

The result of the simultaneous t\ 
radio program campaign was three 
weeks of high attendance at the ex- 
hibits. On the first Sunday afternoon 
of showing. 3,000 attended, despite 



stormy weather and competition from 
other attractions such as a local con- 
cert and another promotion going on 
in behalf of the station itself. 

Many national brands whose prod- 
ucts were used in the homes cooper- 
ated in the exhibits. These brands 
include Drexel. Bigelow. Frigidaire. 
Sherwin-Williams. GE Weatherton. 

The best route to the exhibit was 
demonstrated to the public on tv with 
films of Miss Lee and Holle driving 
through the countryside, pointing out 
landmarks and road signs on the w a\ . 

The two tv personalities also ap- 
peared in live studio sequences dur- 
ing the actual broadcasts, injecting 
humor and vitality into the presenta- 
tions, and providing over-all continu- 
it\ to tie the filmed scenes together. 

Another feature of the t\ presenta- 
tions were a series of concise inter 
views with construction and furnish- 
ing experts. The radio shows were 
written by Susan Fritz of the WAP] 
staff. 

While in am exhibit ol homes the 
ratio of actual buyers among those 
attending is necessarilj low. both the 
local LFI dealer and station execu- 
tives were well satisfied with the turn- 
out and enthusiasm produced 1>\ this 
two-wa) air media program promo- 
tion. 






WHY THE 'QUIZ-PANEL 



TO TELL THE TRUTH (above) along with I've Got a Secret, What's My Line, Keep Talking, Masquerade Party, were 19S8-S9 "quiz panels" 



^ Last fall's quiz show scandals didn't affect such 
panel programs as What's My Line, Vve Got a Secret 

^ Here's why shows in panel category have enviable 
records for long life, big audiences and low costs 



W 



ith all the furor over the pleth- 
ora of Westerns on net tv, and the 
current rage for specials which will 
place at least 150 of these high- 
budget, one-shot programs on the air 
next season (at an average talent cost 
of $250,000 per show) it is all too 



36 



easy to forget or overlook certain 
more modest, less publicized program 
types which have an amazingly solid 
track record. 

One of the most interesting of 
these is a specialized category of 
shows which Nielsen labels "quiz- 



panel" programs I they are not "quiz- 
giveaways" nor, in the strict sense of 
the word, are they "audience partici- 
pations") . 

This past year there were five quiz- 
panels on the tv networks — I've Got a 
Secret, What's My Line, Masquer- 
ade Party, To Tell the Truth, and 
Keep Talking — and the more you dig 
into the performance of such shows, 
the more apt you are to be impressed 
by their longevity, ratings, modest 
talent budgets, and attractive costs 
per thousands. 

Many are extremely hardy peren- 
nials. What's My Line has been on 




SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



SHOWS ARE TV STABLES 



the air since 1950. Vve Got a Secret 
since 1953, To Tell the Truth since 
1957, and all three have been re- 
turned for 1959-60. 

Their talent budgets are among the 
lowest in net tv. Compared to an 
average talent cost per half hour pro- 
gram of $38,000. sponsor estimates 
these prices for the quiz-panels: 
What's My Line .. ....$32,000 

I've Got a Secret .. 27.000 

To Tell the Truth . 22.000 

Masquerade Party .. . 18.000 

Keep Talking . 18,000 

Their ratings are, in most cases, 
satisfactorily high. The quiz scan- 
dals which last fall scuttled such old 
standbys as $64,000 Question, Twen- 
ey One and $64,000 Challenge, had 
little if any effect on quiz-panel popu- 
larity. Nielsen reports that the five 
shows as a group rated within 10% 
of the average of all nighttime half 
hours, and other rating services have 
frequently placed What's My Line 
and I've Got a Secret among the top 
10. during the past season. 

Y\ hat are the secrets of quiz-panel 
success? What does it take to pro- 
duce a good show of this type? Why 
aren't there more of them on the air? 



Are agencies and advertisers missing 
a bet? 

In exploring the answers to these 
questions, you'll find yourself almost 
inevitably on the 30th floor of New 
York's Seagram Building, in the 
plush offices of Goodson-Todman, the 
production firm which has a near 
monopolistic control of quiz-panel 
business. 

The top three quiz-panel programs 
—"Line," "Secret" and "Truth" are 
all G-T produced. Mark Goodson 
and Bill Todman are also responsible 
for Beat the Clock, Price Is Right 
and the Rebel (a new film show 
scheduled for fall I but their unique 
mastery of quiz-panels is one of the 
real phenomena of net tv program- 
ing. 

According to Gil Fates, executive 
producer for all three G-T quiz- 
panels, the popularity of these shows 
can be traced to many things — real- 
ism, immediacy, ad-libbed humor, 
game appeal, the charm of the unex- 
pected, and the personalities of the 
panel members and such m.c. s as John 
Dalv. Bud Collier, and Garry Moore. 

But both Fates and H. M. I Bud I 
Austin. G-T v.p. for sales, insist that 



QUIZ-PANEL BOX SCORE 

Started Talent Cost 1 1 I Rating (2) 



What's My Line 


1950 


$32,000 


20.3 


I've Got a Secret 


1953 


27.000 


30.0 


To Tell the Truth 


1957 


22.00(1 


22.8 


Masquerade Party (3) 


1955 


18,000 


14.8 


Keep Talking 


1959 


1S.000 


7.9 



(1( Talent Costs are STOtiSOK-eStimated. <2l Average audience from second 
March 1959 Nielsen report. <3) Not on network during 1957-58 season. 




ONLY 20 r ; OF SUCCESS of a "quiz pan 
el" show like /'ve Got a Secret (above) is 
due to program idea, say Goodson-Todman 



the most important factors in build- 
ing a successful quiz-panel arc pro- 
duction care, experience, and :-a\\\. 

"Less than 20' i of a quiz-panel's 
success is due to the original program 
idea. >a\> \ustin. "and that's where 
man) agencies, advertisers, networks, 
and other packagers have -tubU-d 
their toes in the past. 

"You cant take a bright idea, slap 
it on the air. and expect t<> produce 
il w itli \ our lefi hand. I liat - how 
Hops are horn.' 

i Please turn to j><t^e 7o I 



-I'oNsoi; 



4 july 1959 



37 



pilllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllll I!lllllll!llllll!lllllll!lllll!llllll!llllll!llll!lllllllll!lllll!llllllllllli!lllllllllllli ||||||j 

| LET'S GROW COLD TOGETHER j 

Ted Smith of Adam Young Inc., a veteran spot radio salesman known to agencies for 
his wit, British accent and flowering moustache, has composed these versified senti- 
ments about conditions and problems in his favorite advertising medium. 

BY TED SMITH 



Let's not be beastly to each other 
Radio does not deserve this fate 
Though reverses we have suffered 
We've been pilloried and buffered 
(Unlike aspirin — we won't disintegrate) 



Let's not be party to a feud, boys, 

There are other enemies outside the door 

There is Teevee, and there's print 

And RAB gives us a hint — 

That there's many, many, many, many more 



Let us gird ouselves together, for the fight, then 

Choose our weapons just as shrewdly as our mounts 

Of these weapons, sharp and blunt 

Keep our memories Right Up Front 

( 'Cause as Ekberg says, it's what's up front that counts) 



Let's REMEMBER to attack the billboard lovers 

With some wisely chosen, snide, sarcastic words 

Tell 'em billboards are the tops 

For concealing cycle cops 

And as targets for the large dive bombing birds 



Let's REMEMBER to annihilate sky writing 

Say that though we hate to slander the deceased — 

It is really not a joke 

This is money, up in smoke 

And in March winds, it's the most, to say the least 



Let's REMEMBER we must slaughter 

matchbook covers 
Tell them only to approacb them with much presage 
Say the only man we know 
Who with memory did show 
Blew his hand in flames — and thus, he got the message 



Let's REMEMBER we must deprecate direct mail 
Say that half the mailings, really, are not seen 



Tell them, though they're for-mi-darble 

They are also ex-pen-darble 

And they end up. mostly, right in file thirteen 



Let's REMEMBER we must maim the printed dailies 

Say the use of hypo's just a wee bit late 

And the patient needs no pills 

Just the reading of the wills 

All that's needed to dispose of "Fourth Estate" 



Let's REMEMBER to be modest, when we win, boys 

We'll be bashful, we'll be shy, and better yet 

We will think it's aught but funny 

As we visualize the money 

And. above all. we'll remember to FORGET 



We'll FORGET that radio's strength is truly local 

Local news, and local personality 

In forgetting, seal our fate 

By a straight capitulate 

To the big boys, CBS. and NBC 



We'll FORGET we still have yet to fight the Networks 
We'll negate Spot Radio's flexibility 
We will sigh a long sad sigh 
As we prepare ourselves to die 
Facing network radio's hex-ability 



We'll FORGET it's local radio that moves millions 

Makes the sales that make a strong economy 

When the Networks cry "We're cheaper" 

We will bow before the reaper 

As we die, we'll say 'You're right, oh yes, dear me! 



We'll FORGET the pain as network radio strikes us 

We will take it all in dumb stupidity 

As the shades of night fall darker 

We will contemplate the marker 

"On this spot's the spot SPOT RADIO used to be!" 



Illllll!llllllll!lllllllllll!H 

38 



minium 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



TV BASICS/JULY 



■/ 



Do web shows really mirror tastes? 



^ Generally they do, says Nielsen study comparing 
viewing habits by program type with network schedules 



ft ith fall network tv plans about 
90% firm, the ever-present question 
is now in order: 

How accurately will network sched- 
ules reflect public taste? 

It will be some time, of course, 
until the answers come in but an in- 
teresting study of how well the webs 



have done in the past has been put 
together for sponsor by the A. C. 
Nielsen Co. ( see chart below I . 

The study compares, over a period 
of four seasons, I ] I the percentage 
of the nighttime schedule devoted to 
various program types vs. (2) the 
share of total viewing time viewers 



devote to these same >h<>\\ l\pes. 

Ilif stud) reveals the networks 
come prett) close to mirroring mass 
tastes — but not always. 

The differences between share-of- 
schedule and share-of-\ iew ing-time for 
different show types are due to a 
variety of causes. Among the most 
important are: I 1 I there can be a big 
range in ratings among shows in one 
category : 1 2 1 some categories can 
do well because the various shows 
are placed in better time periods. ^ 



mini wi i Wlliliwiiliiwiuiwiii i iii iiwwiiiiiiiiiiw i! .. - ;iiiiimii;ii;iiiiiwv 



How network schedules compare with viewing time devoted to show types 



Show type 



Nighttime network programming time 
1956 1957 1958 1959 



Nighttime network viewing time 
1956 1957 1958 1959 



Drama — 30 min. 


10% 


7% 


4% 


5% 


Drama — 60 & 90 min. 


11 


14 


8 


7 


Variety — 30 min. 


15 


6 


9 


9 


Variety — 60 min. 


12 


23 


18 


18 


Western — 30 min. 


4 


5 


7 


11 


Western — 60 min. 




1 


4 


7 


Adventure — 30 min. 


3 


6 


7 


6 


Situation comedy — 30 min. 


13 


12 


13 


11 


Quiz & audience part. 


10 


11 


9 


6 


Suspense 


6 


5 


10 


7 


Information 


6 


5 


5 


8 


Miscellaneous 


10 


5 


6 


5 



100% 100% 100% 100% 



9% 


7% 


5% 


5% 


13 


15 


8 


7 


8 


6 


7 


8 


16 


18 


16 


13 


4 


6 


10 


14 




1 


5 


10 


4 


6 


6 


5 


16 


15 


15 


12 


11 


11 


10 


7 


5 


5 


10 


8 


5 


4 


3 


6 


9 


6 


5 


5 



100% 100% 1C0% 



100% 



Source: A. C. Nielsen, spring each year. Percent i>f network schedules devoted to various program types vs. percent "t total viewing time devoted to lhes< 



mil wi|iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMii'i!i'iiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii;iiiiiiiii:iiii:iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiwii:ii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iimiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiu Ill mini in 



WIIIWIIIIIIIIIIIIWIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW 



1. THIS MONTH IN NETWORK TV 



Network Sales Status Week Ending 4 July 

Daytime 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

SPONSORED HOURS 
13:15 



ABC 

CBSt 

NBCf 



126:30 



.21 :45 



SillllflHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

f Excluding pre-10 a.m. shows. 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



Nighttime 

SPONSORED HOURS 



ABC 
CBS 
NBCv 



118:30 
■■23:30 



119:45 



iiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiii!3 



1 Excluding Jnfk Puur 



39 




NIGHTTIME 



C O 




P A 



SUNDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



MONDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



Conquest 
sust 



vleet The Press 
sust 



lohn Daly News 

sust 



|ohn Daly News 

sust 



John D 



Twentieth 
Century 

Prudential 
(R-McC) 
-F $35,000 



No net service 



Chet Huntley 
Reporting 

sust 



D Edwards 

Amer Home 

(Bates) 

N-L $9.500tt 



News 

Texaco (C&W) 

N-L $6,500tt 



D. Edwards 

Equitable 

(FC&B) 

JuPont <BBDO) 

*-L $9,500tt 



News 

Texaco (C&W) 
N-L $6,500tt 



|You Asked for It 
Skippy Peanut 
Butter (GBB) 

|M-F $24,000 



Lassie 

Campbell Soup 

(BBDO) 

A-F $37,000 



Midwestern 
Hayride 



No net service 



No net service 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 
Amer Home 
(repeat feed) 



News 

Texaco 

(repeat feed) 



ABC News 
sust 



D Edwards 

Equitable 
DuPont 

(repeat feed) 



News 

Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



_ 

ABC 



Maverick 

(7:30-8:30) 
iKalser Co (T&R) 
iDrackett (Y&R) 
|W-F $70,000 



That's My Boy 

sust 



Suspicion 

(7:30-8:30) 
sust 



3 olka Co-Round 
(7:30-8:30) 

sust 



Name That 
Tune 

Amer Home 

(Bates) 

Q-L $23,000 



Buckskin 

sust 
W-F $24,000 



Cheyenne 

(alt u'ks 

7:30-8:30) 

Harold Ritchie 

(K&E) 

Johnson & Johnson 

(Y&R) 
W-F $78,000 



Stars in Action 

sust 



Dragnet 

sust 
My-F $35,000 



Music 

Summ 

(7:0 



Maverick 



Ed Sullivan 

(8-9) 
Mercury (K&E) 
alt Kodak (JWT) 
V-L $79,500 



Suspicion 



Polka Co-Round 



The Texan 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Bates) 

alt 

Lever (K&E) 

W-F $37,000 



Restless Cun 

Sterling Drug 

(DFS) alt 

P&G (Oompton) 

W-F $37,500 



Sugarfoot 

(alt wks 

7:30-8:30) 

Am Chicle 

(Bates) 

B. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

W-F $78,000 



Playhouse of 
Mystery 



Steve Canyon 

L&M (Mc-E) 

alt sust 

A-F $44,000 



Music 
Summ 



Law Man 

B. J. Reynolds 

(EJsty) 

General Mills 

(DFS) 

I W-F $41,000 



Ed Sullivan 



Pete Kelly's 
Blues 

L&M (Mc-E) 

alt sust 

A-F $54,500t 



Bold Journey 

Ralston-Purina 

(GBB) 

A-F $9,500 



Father Knows 

Best 

Lever (JWT) alt 

Scott (JWT) 
Sc-F $38,000 



Wells Fargo 

Amer Tobacco 

(SSC&B) 

alt Buick 

(Mc-E) 

W-F $43,800 



Wyatt Earp 

Gen Mills (DFS) 

alt P&G 

(Compton) 

W-F $38,000 



To Tell the 
Truth 

Carter (Bates) 

Marlboro 

(Burnett) 

Q-L $22,000 



Jimmy Rogers 

L&M (DFS) 

alt sust 

V-L $35,00C 



Ozzie I 

Kodak 

Quail 
Sc-F 



Colt .45 

P&G (B&B) 

7/19 S 

I W-F $13,800 



C. E. Theatre 

Gen Electric 

(BBDO) 

Dr-F $51,000 



Summer Chevy 

Show 

(9-10) 

Chevrolet 

(Camp-E) 

V-L $65,000 



Pantomime 
Quiz 

sust 



Frontier Justice 

Gen Foods 

(B&B.) 

Sc-F $11,000 



Peter Cunn 

Bristol-Myers 

(DCS&S) 

My-F $38,000 



The Rifleman 

Miles Lab 

(Wade) 

P&G (B&B) 

Ralston 

(Gardner) 

W-F $36,000 



Peck's Bad Cir 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 
V-L $30,000 



The Californian: 

sust 
W-F $37.50( 



Doni I 



Camp 

IP' 



P&G I 
Sc-F I 



Deadline For 
Action 

(9:30-10:30) 
sust 



Hitchcock 

Presents 

Bristol-Myers 

(T&R) 

My-F $39,000 



Summer Chevy 
Show 



Top Pro Coif 

(8:30-10:30) 
General Tire & 
Rubber (D'Arcy) 

Sp-F $17,250 



Joseph Cotten 

Show 

Gen Foods 

(B&B) 

Sc-F $12,500 



Alcoa-Coodyear 

Theater 
Alcoa (FSB) al 
Goodyear (Y&R! 
Dr-F $39,001 



Naked City 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

Brown & Wmsn 

(Bates) 
My-F $37,000 



Spotlight 
Playhouse 
Pet Milk 
(Gardner) 
S. C. Johnson 
(NL&B) 
Dr-F $10.00( 



Bob Cummings 

Reynolds (Esty) 
alt 

sust 
Sc-F $36,00( 



Deadline For 
Action 



Richard 

Diamond 

Lorillard (L&N) 

A-F $36,000 



Loretta Young 

P&G (B&B) 
Dr-F $42,500 



Top Pro Coif 

Open 



Desilu 

Playhouse 

(10-11) 

Westinghouse 

(Mc-E) 

Dr-F $82,000 

(average) 



Arthur Murray 

Party 

P. Lorillard 

(L&N) alt 

V-L $30.00( 



Alcoa Presents 

Alcoa (FSB) 
Dr-F $35,000 



Andy Williams 
Show 

(10-11) 
Revlon (LaRoche) 
v-L $:.o.nni 



David Niven 

Singer (Y&R) 

alt 

Flit (Mc-E) 

Dr-F $32,00 



We I I 

f| 

Brown 
(I 
Mileiil 

Hi' 
Sp I. '. 



Meet McCraw 

Alberto Culver 

(Wade) 

A-F $9,501 



What's My Line 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

alt Sunbeam 

(Pen-ln-Paus) 

Q-L $32,000 



No net service 



Desilu 
Playhouse 



Andy Williams 

Kellogg 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Pittsburgh Plati 

(Maxon) 



*Oolop show, ttCost ii per segment. Prices do not include sustaining, par- 
ticipating or co-op programs. Costs refer to average show costs including 
talent and production. They are gross (include 15% agency commission). 



They do not include commercials or time charges. This chart covers perioc 
4 July -31 July. Program types are indicated as follows: (A) Adventure 
(Au) Audience Participation, (C) Comedy, (D) Documentary, (Dr), 



40 



SPONSOR 



4 july 195' 



\ G R A P 




4 JULY -31 JULY 



DNESDAY 

BS NBC 



THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS NBC 



SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 



ohn Daly News 



ohn Daly News 

sust 



Iwards 
» (Bates) 
I Foodi 

AB) 
$9.500tt 



News 

Texaco (C&W) 
-L $6.500tt 



D Edwards 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

I-L $9.500tt 



News 
'exaco (C&W) 
-L $6,500tt 



D Edwards 

Equitable Life 

(FC&B) 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

N-L $9,500tt 



News 
Texaco (C&W) 
-L $6,500tt 



No net service 



No net service 



No net service 



[Iwards 

iirter 
!• Foods 
tit feed) 



News 

Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



D Edwards 

Whitehall 



News 

Texaco 
(repeat feed) 



ABC News 

sust 



Wagon T i a i n 

(7:30-8:30) 
cord (var. hour) 

(JWT) 

>'ational Biscuit 

(var. % hr.) 

(Mc-E) 

V-F $35,500 

<%hr.) 



D Edwards 

Equitable Life 

Parliament 

(repeat feed) 



News 

Texacj 

(repeat feed) 



Might 
l»ater 



Invisible Man 

sust 

(L 7/9) 

TBA 



Texas 
Rodeo 

sust 



Rin Tin Tin 
Nabisco (K&E) 
A-F $36,000 



Rawhide 

(7:30- 8:30) 

Lever (JWT) 

Pharmaceuticals 

(Parkson) 
W-F $90,000 

(1 hour) 



Northwest 
Passage 



Dick Clark 

Show 

Beech-Nut 

Life Savers 

(Y&R) 

Mu-L $14,500 



Reckoning 

(7:30-8:30) 

Fla. Citrus 

(B&B) 

H.Curtis (Weiss) 

Parliament 

(B&B) 

Mj I 



People Are 

Funny 

Tonl (North) »lt 

R. J. Remolds 

(Eaty) 

Au-F $34.00» 

i 



Perry Presents 
(8-9) 

Clark. 
(FC&B) 
RCA & Whirlpool 
(K&E) 
I 

DDB 
Y-L $60,000 



Talking 
Research 



$lS.ono 



Wagon Train 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 
various Ys hrs) 



Zorro 

AC Spark 

(Brother) 

7 -Up (JWT) 

A-F $37,000 



December Bride 
General Foods 

(B&B) 
5c-F $32,000 



Who Pays? 

sust 



Walt Disney 
Presents 

(8-9) 

Hill Bros. 

(Ayer) 

M-F $47,000 

<% hr.) 



Rawhide 

Parliament 

(B&B) 



urther Advent. 

>f Ellery Queen 

(8-9) 

sust 

tly-F $27,500 
(H hr.) 



Jubilee, U.S.A. 
(8-9) 
Wmsn-Dickle 
(Evans & Assoc.) 
Hill Bros. (Ayer) 
Mu-L $12,500 
(Yi hr.) 



Reckoning 

Sterling (DF3) 

Gulf (Y&R) 

Hamm (C-M) 

Col rata 

Van Heusen 

(Grey) 



rkdown 
•cony 

(npton) 
It Tobac 
llDOl 
P $33,500 



Price Is Right 

Lever (JWT) 

3-L $21,500 



The Real 

McCoys 

P&O (Cotnpton) 

Sc-F $36,000 



Derringer 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) 

alt 

P. Lorlllard 

(L&N) 

W-F $40,000 



Lawless Years 

sust 



Walt Disney 

Hudson Pulp 

(N.C&K) 

Reynolds Metal 

(Lennen & 

Newell) 



I Love Lucy 

susl 

Purex i Weiss) 

; 24 only 



Ellery Queen 



Jubilee, U.S.A. 

Massey-Ferguson 

(NL&B) 

'■2 open 



Wanted Dead 

or Alive 
Bin .^ Wmson 

(Bates) 

Bristol-Myers 

(DCS&S) 

W-F $39,000 



Perry Presents 

Sunbeam 

Pel in Paus) 

Noxzema 

(SSC&B) 

Am Dairy (C-M] 



illionaire 
t (Bates) 
H $37,000 



Kraft Music 

Hall 
Starring Dave 
King 
Kraft 
(JWT) 
Mu-L $45,000 



Leave It To 
Beaver 

Miles (Wade) 
Etalsorj (Gardner) 

Bay (Grey) 
Sc-F $36,000 



Zane Crey 

S. C. Johnson 

(NL&B) alt 

General Foods 

(B&B) 

iV-F $45,000 



lachelor Father 

im Home(Bates) 
Vm Tob (Gumb.) 
F $12,000 



Tombstone 

Territory 

Lipton (Y&R) 

Philip Morris 

(Burnett) 

W-F $33,500 



Phil Silvers 
R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty) 

Schick (B&B) 

Sc-F $42,000 



M Squad 

Amer. Tobac. 

(SSC&B) 

alt 

G.E iliHDO) 

Uy-F $31,000 



Lawrence Welk 

(9-10) 
Bodge (Grant) 
Mu-L $17,500 
(% hr.) 



Brenner 

Lever uwti 

V F $3S,000 



Black Saddle 
L&M (xrc-E) 

alt 

Colgate (Mc-E) 

W-F $37,000 



I Cot a 

cret 
lf> (Esty) 
$27,000 



Bat Mastcrson 

Kraft (JWT) 
W-F $38,000 



Rough Riders 

P. Lorlllard 

(L&N) 

alt sust 

W-F $47.000t 



Playhouse 90 

(9:30-11) 

Amer Gas 

(L&N) alt 

Kimberly-Clark 

(FC&B) 
Dr-L&F $45,000 
(V4 hr.) 



21 Beacon St. 

Ford (JWTi 
i-F {18 I 



77 Sunset Stri 

(9:30-10:30) 

Amer. Chicle 

(Bates) 

My-F $72,000 



Lux Playhouse 
Lever (JWT] 

alt wks 
Stripe Plyhse 
Lever (JWT) 

Dr-F $38,000 



Colgate 
Western 
Theater 

('"l-.ll.- i|'..,trO 

W-F $13,000 



Lawrence Welk 



Have Cun. Will 

Travel 
Whitehall 

(Bates) 

alt Lever (JWT) 

W-F $38,000 



Cimarron City 
(9:30-10:30) 



W-F 



sust 



$30,000 
(tt hr.) 



S.'.teel Hr 
lis 10-11) 



$60,000 



This Is Your 

Life 

P&G (B&B) 

D-L $52,000 



This Is Music 

sust 



Playhouse 90 

Allstate 

(Burnett) 

alt 

Reynolds (Esty) 



You Bet Your 

Life 
Tonl (North) 

alt 

Lever (JWT) 

i-L $51,750 



77 Sunset Strip 

Carter Prod. 

(Bates) 

Whitehall 

(Bates) 

Harold Ritchie 

(K&E) 



The Line Up 

P&G (Y&R) 

My-P $34,000 



Cavalcade of 
Sports 

Sillette (Maxon) 

(10-ooncl) 
3p-L $45,000 



Big Picture 



Cunsmoke 

L&M (DF3) alt 

Sperry-Rand 

(Y&R) 

W-F $40,000 



Cimarron City 
Cons. Cigars 

(I.&N) 



c Theatre 
I s 10-11) 



F* $48,000 



Playhouse 90 

Renault (NL&B) 
sust 



Masquerade 

Party 

[/wlllard (L&N) 

alt Sargent 
}-L $13,000 



Amateur Hour 
Pharmaceuticals 

1 1'arkson) 
VI, $23,000 



Jackpot Bowling 
H.iMik (Wennan 

& Schorr) 
5p-L $3,000 



Markham 

Schlltx i JWT) 

My-F $39,000 



DA's Man 

L&M i Mc-E) 

* >' $38.00; 



Drama, (P) Film, (I) Interview, (J) Juvenile, (L) Live, (M) Misc, 
(Mu) Music, (My) Mystery, (N) News, (Q) Quiz-Panel, (Sc) Situation 
Comedy, (Sp) Sports, (V) Variety, (W) Western. tNo charge for repeats. 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



L preceding date means last date on air. S following date means startinsr 
date for new show or sponsor in time slot. 



41 



THE PGW COLONEL SAYS: 



** 1» 



**»> 




"We believe that 

the profit share affects 
the interest rate!" 

Everyone at PGW can share in our earnings 
. . . and share in them substantially. 

Of course our revenue is derived wholly from 
the sale of spot time on the stations we repre- 
sent and we think it pays off handsomely to 
have everyone at PGW interested in that. 
Don't you? 



P JETERS, 
G BIFFIN. 



Woodward, 




INC 



Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT HOLLYWOOD 
ATLANTA DALLAS FT. WORTH SAN FRANCISCO 



DAYTIME 



C O 




P A F 






10:00 
10:15 
10:30 
10:45 
11:00 
11:15 
11:30 



1 1 :45 



12:15 
12:30 
12:45 



SUNDAY 

CBS NBC 



Lamp Unto M) 
Feet 

suit 



Look Up & Liv< 
sust 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS NBC 



On The Co 

sust 



Sam Levenson 

sust 



Dough Re Mi 



Treasure Hunt 

sust 



P&G alt 
Lever 



TUESDAY 

ABC CBS 



On The Co 

sust 



Sam Levenson 

sust 



NBC 



Dough Re Mi 

sust 



Treasure Hunt 

Culver alt 
sust 



Frigidalre lit 



M 



Eye On 
New York 

suit 



I Love Lucy 

Lever alt 
sust 



Price Is Right 

Lever 

alt Ponds 

Sterling 

alt Whitehall 



I Love Lucy 
Lever 

sust 
alt Gen Foods 



Price Is Right 

Lever alt 

Sunshine 

Stand Brands 



Camera Three 

sust 



Top Dollar 

Colgate 



Concentration 

Culver alt 
Lever 



Armour 

alt Lever 



Top Dollar 
Colgate 

General Foods 
alt sust 



Concentration 

Frigidaire 

Lever all 

Alberto Culver 



Bishop Pike 

sust 



Across The 
Board 

sust 



Love of Life 

sust 
Amer Home Pro 

alt sust 



Tic Tac Dough 

Ponds 



Across The 
Board 



Love of Life 

sust alt 
Gen Mills 



Tic Tac Dough 

Stand Brands 



Amer Home 



Across 
Boai 

SUSI 



Johns Hopkins 
File 7 

sust 



Pantomime 
Quiz 

sust 



Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



It Could Be You 

Whitehall 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



Ponds alt P&G 



Pantomime 
Quiz 

sust 



iearch For 

Tomorrow 

P&G 



Cuiding Light 
P&G 



It Could Be 
You 

Al. Culver alt 

sust 

Armour alt P&G 



Panton 
Qi 

Li 



on 
ui L 



College News 
Conference 



Music Bingo 
sust 



No net service 



News 

(I:z5-1:30) 

sust 



No net service 



Music Bingo 
sust 



No net service 



News 

(1:15-1:30) sust 



No net service 



Music 



Eternal Light 
sust 



Leo Durocher' 
Warmup 

sust 



World Turns 
P&G 



Sterling alt 
Carnation 



No net service 



World Turns 
P&G 



Sterling alt 
Miles 



No net service 






Baseball Came 

of the Week 

various times 

various sponsor! 



Major League 
Baseball 

Phillies Cigars 

{V 2 network) 
Anheuser-Buscl 



Day In Court 

Amer Home 

Foods 

Johnson & 

Johnson 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

sust 



Queen for a 
Day 



Day In Court 

General Foods 



For Better Or 
For Worse 

sust 



Queen for a 
Day 

sust 



Miles 

alt sust 



sust alt 
Alberto Culver 



Day In 

Beech- 



(H regional) 
National Brewin 

(% regional) 
Genesee Brewin 
Hi New York) 



Cale Storm 
Show 

Armour 
Lever 



Art Linklerter 

Stand Brands 

alt Lever 



Standard Brand i 
Van Camp 



lourt of Hums 
Relations 

sust 



Cale Storm 
Show 

Block Drug 
Amer Home 



Art 



Linkletter 

Swift 
alt Tonl 
Kellogg 



Hourt of Human 
Relations 



CaleS 

Beech- 



Open Hearing 
sust 



Beat The Clock 

Lever 
Block Drug 



Big Payoff 
Colgate 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 



Beat The Clock 

General Foods 
Toni 



Big Payoff 

General Foods 
alt sust 



Young 
Dr. Malone 

P&G alt sust 



Beat The. 

Johnso 

J ohm 

Beech 



Who You Trust? 

Armour 
Johnson & 

Johnson 



Verdict Is Your; 
Stand Brands 



Amer Home 
alt Lever 



From These 
Roots 

sust 



Who Do You 
Trust? 

General Foods 
Amer Home 



Verdict Is Your : 

Gen Mills 

a lt Carnatio n 

Swift 

alt Tonl 



From These 
Roots 
P&G 



Who Di 
Trus 



American 
Bandstand 

Clairol, 
Beech-Nut 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 

Amer Home Pn 



Truth or 
Consequences 

Sterling 

P&G 



American 

Bandstand 

Lever 

General Mills 



Brighter Day 
P&G 



Secret Storm 

Gen Mills 



Truth or 

Consequences 

Standard Brand 



Amer 
Bands 

Shu I 

Arroi' 



American 
Bandstand 

Rolley 

Northam-Warren 



Edge of Nighl 
P&G 



County Fair 

sust alt 

Lipton 

Sterling 

alt Lever 



American 
Bandstand 

Carter 
Welch 



Edge ef Nighl 
P&G 



County Fair 

sust 

sust alt 
Lever 



Amer 
Bands 

Regit 
AMF Pir 



Paul Winchel 

sust 



The Last Worp 1 
sust 



American 

Bandstand 

co-op 



American 

Bandstand 

eo-op 



Amer 

Bands 

«o-< 



Lone Ranger 
Gen Mills 

Cracker Jack 
Fritoe Co. 



Face the 
Nation 

sust 



Frontiers of 
Faith 

sust 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 

Goodrich 
Bristol-Myers 



Walt Disney's 

Adventure Tims 

co-op 



Mickey 
Chi 

Good; 
Gen 1 



NOTE: On ABC TV, Day In Court, Gale Storm, Beat the Clock, Who Do You Trust?, and American Bandstand do not show day of participations, 



HOW TO USE SPONSOR'S 1 
NETWORK TELEVISION 
COMPARAGRAPH 



The network schedule on this and preceding pages (40, 41) 
includes regularly scheduled programing 4 July to 
31 July, inclusive (with possible exception of changes 
made by the networks after presstime) . Irregularly sched- 

■I 



\ G R A P 




4 JULY - 31 JULY 



DNESDAY 

IBS NBC 


THURSDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


FRIDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


SATURDAY 

ABC CBS NBC 


'he Co 


Dough Re Mi 

■ust 




On The Co 

SU-t 


Dough Re Mi 

suat 




On The Co 
lust 


Dough Re Mi 

suit 

Armour 

alt Nabisco 




Captain 
Kangaroo 

Participating 
and sust 


Howdy Doody 
sust 


sust alt 
Brown & Wmsn 


Continental 
Baking 


evenson 

JSt 


Treasure Hunt 

sust 




Sam Levenson 

sust 


Treasure Hunt 

sust 

alt Frlgldaire 

P&G 

alt Heinz 




Sam Levenson 

U.S. Steel 

alt sust 

lust 


Treasure Hunt 

Gen Mills alt 

sust 




Mighty Mouse 

Gen Foods alt 

Colgate 


Ruff & Reddy 

Hordrn alt sust 
Gen Foods 
tit Man 


Com Prod 
alt P&G 


sust 


Whitehall tit 
Sterling 


• Lucy 
•r alt 

er alt 

JSt 


Price Is Right 

Frigldalro 

Sterling 

Heinz alt 

Arnunir 




1 Love Lucy 

Lever 


Price Is Right 

Al. Culver 
alt Lever 




1 Love Lucy 

Lever alt 

Toni 


Price Is Right 

Lever tit 

Com Prod 

Stand Brands 

Gen Mills 


1 

Uncle Al Show 

(11-12) ' 

N'atlonal Biscuit 


Heckle & |eckle 

sust 


Fury 

Borden 

alt Gen Foods 


9oott 


Miles tit 
I^ever 


Kodak alt Dow 


Gen Mills 


Dollar 
tats 


Concentration 
Heinz alt Mile* 




Top Dollar 

Colgate 

sust 


Concentration 

Nestle 
alt Lever 
Heinz tit 
Whitehall 




Top Dollar 
Oolgate 

sll>t 


Concentration 

Ponds tit 
Bauer & Black 


Uncle Al Show 


Adventures of 

Robin Hood 

sust 


Circus Boy 
Mars alt 

sust 


Nabisco tit 
Brillo 


JSt 


Lever alt 
Brn & Wmsn 


Colgate alt suit 


of Life 

alt 
ver 

w» Prod 
Lever 


Tic Tac Dough 

Heinz alt 
Brn & Wmsn 


Across The 
Board 

sust 


Love of Life 

Scott alt Lever 

Amer Home 


Tic Tac Dough 

Al. Culver 

tit Heinz 

P&G 


Across The 
Board 

StISt 


Love of Life 

Atlantis 

alt Toni 

Lever alt 

Gen Mills 


Tic Tac Dough 

Gen Mills alt 

Sunshine 

P&G 






True Story 

suit 


P&G 


Sterling Drug 


I'h For 
Ijrrow 

&G > 


Could Be You 

Whitehall tit 

Nestle 

Corn Prod 

alt Brillo 


Pantomime 

Quiz 

A rraour 

General Foods 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 


It Could Be 
You 

Milea alt 

Nabisco 

P&G 


Pantomime 

Quiz 

Armour 


Search for 

Tomorrow 

P&G 


Could Be You 
Stand Brandt 

alt sust 






Detective Diary 
Sterling Drug 


l? Light 
to 


Guiding Light 
PAG 


Cuiding Light 
P&G 


P&G alt 

Corn Prod 


■ust 


service 


No net service 


Music Bingo 

sust 


No net service 


No net service 


Music Bingo 

sust 


No net service 


No net service 






Mr. Wizard 

sust 


■ws 

30) suit 


News 

(1:25-1:30) su«t 


News 

(1:25-1:30) sust 


Turns 
to 

nc alt 

ISt 


No net service 




As the World 
Turns 
P&G 

Plllsbury 


No net service 




World Turns 

P&G 

Swift 

alt Sterling 


No net service 








tter Or 
A/orse 
;r alt 

St 

sag alt 


Queen for a 
Day 

sust 


Day In Court 

Drackett. 


For Better Or 
For Worse 

sust 


Queen for a 
Day 

sust 


Day In Court 

Armour 


For Better Or 

For Worse 
Lever alt sust 


Queen for a 

Day 

sust 

Nabisco alt sust 




Baseball Came 

of the Week 

various sponsors 

(2 to cnncl) 


Leo Durocher's 
Warmup 

sust 


sust 
alt Lever 


sust 
alt Miles 


Armour 


Gerber 
all -ust 


ikletter 
1 Bra 
larttli 
itlon 


Court of Human 
Relations 

sust 


Cale Storm 

Drackett 


Art Linkletter 
Kellogg 

Plllsbury 


Court of Human 
Relations 

SUSt 


Cale Storm 

Johnson & 

Johnson 


Art Linkletter 

Lever Broa 

Swift alt 

Staley 


Court of Human 
Relations 

sust 








layoff 

Ftate 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

sust 


Beat The Clock 

Drackett 
Armour 


Big Payoff 

sust 


Young 
Dr. Malone 

P&G alt sust 


Beat The Clock 

Amer Home 


Big Payoff 
Cblgat* 


Young 

Dr. Malone 

sust 






Major League 

Baseball 
Phillies Bayuk 
Cigars (Nat'l) 
Anheuser-Buscb 




•ust 


sust 


sust 


lis Yours 


From These 

Roots 

susl 


Who Do You 
Trust? 
Drackett 

Toni 


Verdict Is Your; 

Sterling alt Sootl 

sust 

alt Scott 


From These 
Roots 

Sllst 


Who Do You 

Trust? 

Leva 

General F Is 


Verdict Is Yours 

Gen Mills alt 

Atlantis 

Gen Mills 

alt Lever 


From These 
Roots 
susl 






(recitmal) 
Brewing 
(New York) 


ft- tit 


sust 


sust 


sust 


■it Day 
r Storm 


Truth or 
Consequences 
Corn Prod tit 

sust 


American 

Bandstand 

Toni. Old 

London Foods 


Brighter Day 
P&G 


Truth or 

Consequences 

P&G 


American 
Bandstand 

Mennen 
Amer Home 


Brighter Day 
P&G 


Truth or 
Consequences 
Whitehall alt 

Corn Prod 
P&G 








Secret Storm 

Scott alt 

Amer Home 


Secret Storm 

Amer Home Proc 

alt Gen Mills 


feme Prod 


Culver alt P&G 


P&G 


1 Night 
[ilk alt 


County Fair 
Frigidalre 

alt Gen Mills 


American 
Bandstand 

ll.iylord 
Block Drug 


Edge of Night 

P&G 

Plllsbury 


County Fair 
Heinz alt 

sust 


American 

Bandstand 

Hollywood Candj 


Edge of Night 
P&G 

Amer Home 

alt 

Sterling 


County Fair 

Llpti r 

alt sust 

Level alt 

Slist 








a nils 


Heinz alt 

Sterling 


Lever 






American 

Bandstand 

co-op 






American 

Bandstand 

co-op 
















Walt Disney's 

Adventure Time 

Miles 

Internat. Shoe 






Mickey Mouse 

Club 

Gen Mills 

Mattel 








Lone Ranger 
Nestle alt 
Gen Mills 





it list ill sponsors, Mondaj through Friday, buying programs during month. 

uled programs appear during this period are listed 
as well, with air dates. The only regularly scheduled pro- 
grams not listed are: Tonight, NBC, 11:15 p.m.-l a.m.. 
Monday-Friday, participating sponsorship; Sunday News 



Special, CBS. Sunday. 11-11:15 p.m. (Carter and White- 
hall); Today. NBC, 7-9 a.m., Monday-Friday, particip 
\ews CBS, 7:45-8 a.m. and 8:45-9 a.m., Monday-] 
\11 times are Eastern Standard. 




with, an ear to the ground 



46 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



WflClt S llCLppCTllTlg in Africa? Europe? What about 
that movie star's romance in Spain? WGN-Radio lis- 
teners now know more because of WGN's extensive 
news coverage! 

Yes, WGN-Radio's comprehensive, around-the-clock, 
news coverage is one more important reason why more 
people listen to WGN — because WGN's news gathering 
facilities are unmatched by any other Chicago station. 

Exclusive only to WGN-Radio in Chicago are the Chi- 
cago Tribune World-Wide Press Service, WGN Police- 
Trafficopter reports twelve times daily, and Radio Press 
world-wide, on-the-spot news coverage. In addition, 
WGN's large staff of writers and editors use the news 
gathering services of Associated Press, United Press 
International and Chicago City News Bureau to provide 
Midwestern listeners with the finest programs of up-to- 
the-minute news. 

No wonder more people listen to WGN-Radio for 
more news of happenings around the world! 





WGN-RADIO 

THE GREATEST SOUND IN RADIO 

Hi North Michigan Avenue • Chicago 11, Illinois 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



47 



As advertisers seek better exploitation, SPONSOR ASKS: 

How can agencies capitalize on local 

program promotion? 



Station men tell agencies how to 
work closely with them in pro- 
moting clients' programs, and give 
local slant to national campaigns 

Calen Lillethorup, prom.mgr.,KMTV, 
Omaha. 

Lets have more agency promotion 
ideas and campaigns individually 
tailored to the station, the sponsor 
and to the program. 

The place to start is on a personal 
relationship between the agency and 
the station's promotion and merchan- 
dising departments. Any agency that 
takes the time to meet and talk with 
station promotion personnel has a 
much better chance of receiving the 
best promotion. 

We've been fortunate at KMTV in 
dealing with some agencies that 
realize stations are individuals. 

But too often agencies send a form 
letter to the "station manager" ask- 
ing that "jumbo post cards" be sent 
to local distributors. After the pro- 
motion has concluded, another form 
letter demands the total number of 
jumbos sent and the promotion effec- 
tiveness is graded, like a report card, 
and the station is rated on little more 
than its current printing budget. Let's 
get rid of the report cards, the grad- 
ing, and the form letters. 

Many agencies send a form letter 
asking for an "item count" on the 



Tailor them 
to station, 
sponsor, 
program 



number of on-the-air mentions their 
program has received. There is also 
a handy blank devoted to a column 
inch report of newspaper advertising. 
These are "accepted" things to do, 
but quantity alone is rarely the an- 
swer to good audience promotion. 
Some agencies want the product 




mentioned in the promotion an- 
nouncements. This can make the copy 
awkward, and in many cases limits 
the amount of promotion the program 
can receive due to conflicting adja- 
cencies. 

Good promotion copy that doesn't 
mention the sponsor can be scheduled 
where it will do the most good, and 
can make an audience want to see a 
program. Then, the agency's com- 
mercials can sell the product. Let's 
keep commercials out of the promo- 
tion announcements, and put them in 
the programs where they belong. 

One more point. You can't build 
an audience without tools. Agencies 
should supply still pictures, varying 
lengths of sound and silent film, tapes 
and slides. An enterprising promo- 
tion manager can construct promo- 
tion spots from these materials to suit 
the program and station require- 
ments. 

It is obvious that too many agen- 
cies have a "pattern" of promotion 
requests but give little thought to 
planning the individual program pro- 
motion at hand. I say, let's talk this 
over. The station can really do a job 
if given the tools. 

Jim Knight, prom, dir., WTRF-TV, 
Wheeling. 

At the present time, the most press- 
ing need is the establishment of more 
direct relations with the local station 
promotion departments themselves. 

Thousands of mimeographed agen- 
cy requests pass through a typical 
promotion department each year. 
These requests vary from the basic 
questionnaire concerning market in- 
formation to the more complex 
pertaining to merchandising and pro- 
gram promotion. While the promo- 
tion people are busy filling these 
requests, they must not lose sight of 
their main objective: the creative, 
positive building of an audience for 
their station and advertisers by use 
of on-the-air announcements, exploita- 
tion, public relations, research and 
publicity. On top of all this, features 



are prepared and mailed daily to na-I 
tional trade publications. It's obvi-l 
ous that the station promotion de-' 
partment is big business in itself. 

It would appear that the agency,! 
which controls the placement of 
thousands of dollars of the client's 
money, would want to insure the! 
greatest mileage possible for that! 
dollar, not only at the network level! 



Provide 




an agency 
liaison man 



but at the local as well. This "local 
promotional mileage" could be guar- 
anteed by an agency liason man. I'm 
sure that a liason man between the 
agency and local station would be 
beneficial to both. The agency would 
get to know the station's problems 
first hand, and the station would re- 
ceive the benefit of talking and work- 
ing directly with experienced agency 
personnel. Of greater importance is 
that the agency would then have a 
better understanding of what each 
station can or cannot do in particular 
areas of promotion. 

Promotion of a show at the net- 
work level is only half the job. If 
this same show receives "quality' 
promotion at the local level, its 
chances of being a hit are greatly 
increased. 

The agency liaison man is only one 
step toward the improvement of local 
program promotion. However, it's a 
big step toward better promotion de- 
partment relations between agencies 
and stations ... an area that could 
use much better relations." 

Barbara Wilkens, sales prom, dir., 
WNTA-TV, New York 
A little originality goes a long way. 
As sales promotion director of an in- 
dependent outlet in a seven-station 
market, I feel that ad agencies, espe- 



SPONSOR 



4 JULY 1959 



:iallv the smaller ones, often do not 
ake full advantage of the many op- 
)ortunities to promote and exploit 
oral programs. This local promotion 
s important for the sponsor since it 
s essentially what achieves the neces- 
ai\ sponsor-program identification. 

There is also ample opportunity for 
idvertisers who use a spot schedule to 
dentify their product with programs 
md the station. A good example of 
his is the promotion done by Jack- 
on \ssoc, the agency for Lestoil. 
hc\ not only originate premiums 
hat are promotable by the station in 
arious ways but offer to supply these 
iremiums as free give-aways for use 
li local live shows. Thus Lestoil can 
jie showcased on a variety of pro- 
rams at no additional cost to the 
-tin \ except for premiums. 

Unfortunately many sponsors miss 
|he boat. They spend thousands of 
lollars on spot campaigns but fail to 
ielp the station promote their cam- 



More 

originality, 
ideas 

promotable at 
local level 



signs. Agencies should recognize 
it* advantage to their sponsor by 
[vesting in a few promotional spots. 

I nfortunately, the ad agency too 
ften relies on material from the 
romotion kits supplied by the syn- 
icator if the program is a film series, 
nd upon the station if the program 
• live, for publicity and promotion, 
et because they are in constant con- 
tct with the sponsor, the agency is 
ertainl) in a better position to come 
p with promotional ideas. Merchan- 
ising, premiums, give-aways, direct 
pail, personality tie-ins. exploitation 
|ll offer a rich potential promotion- 

ise for the local program. Agencies 

tould be educated in the value of 
ertinent promotion to help their 
lient achieve sponsor identification 

ith their spot or program buy. 

lharlie Cash, prom, dir., WSM-TV, 
Nashville, Tain. 
The most important single factor 
i solving this continual problem in 
I Please turn to page 57) 





PONSOR 



I .ILLY 1959 



49 



GIANT 



MARKET 



IN. S N C 

•asheville 



MSARS.head .SPARTANBURG 
•GREENVILLE 




"The Giant 

of 

Southern 

Skies" 



GIVES YOU ALL THREE . . . 

GREENVILLE 

SPARTANBURG 
ASHEVILLE 

. . . with total coverage area 
greater than that of Miami, 
Jacksonville, Birmingham or 
New Orleans 



82-County Data (within the TOO 
UV/M contour) S. M. Survey May 
10, 1959 



POPULATION 2,946,600 

INCOMES $3,584,180,000 

RETAIL SALES . . . $2,387,606,000 
HOUSEHOLDS 751,900 

Represented Nationally by 
WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



CHANNEL 4 

WFBC-TV 

GREENVILLE, S. C. 

NBC NETWORK 



RADIO AFFILIATE, 'THE PIEDMONT GROUP" 
WFBC - GREENVILLE WORD - SPARTANBURG 



50 






National and regional buy\ 
in work now or recently completer 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Procter & Gamble Co., Cincinnati: Schedules start this month in 
top markets for Charmin tissues, to run through the P&G contract 
year. Day and night minutes are being used, with frequencies vary- 
ing. Buyer: Sam Haven. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 

Coty, Inc., New York: A new campaign is getting off in about 20 
markets for its fragrance and powder cosmetics. Schedules, to start 
the second week in July, are for four to eight weeks. I.D.'s, minutes 
and 20's are being placed, frequencies depending upon the market. 
Buyer: Bob Wilson. Agency: BBDO, New York. 

Block Drug Co., Inc., Jersey City, N. J.: Being initiated this month 
are new schedules for Polident I denture cleaner) and Poligrip (den- 
ture adhesive), through Gray A. A., New York. Allen Reed has been 
buying minutes in fringe time; frequencies vary from market to mar- 
ket. Schedules start the second week in July in about 25 markets, 
run for four weeks. 

Lever Bros. Co., New York: Its introductory campaign for Surf 
continues to expand, and new schedules start on a staggered basis 
this month. BBDO, New York, is buying 13-week schedules, day and 
night minutes. Bob Hamilton is buying supervisor; Hal Davis, buyer. 

Pillsbury Co., Minneapolis: Intensive schedules are being placed 
in about 75 markets for Angel Cake mix. The promotion starts this 
month for five weeks. Buyers: Wally Bregman and Bill Chrisman. 
Agency: Leo Burnett, Chicago. 

Wildroot, Inc., New York: Hair tonic schedules begin this month 
in 25 markets. Lined up for a 13-week run are sport show adjacen- 
cies and five- and 10-minute sportscasts. Buyer: Eileen Greer. Agen- 
cy : Ted Bates, New York. 



RADIO BUYS 

American Motors Corp., Detroit: New summer schedules for the 
Rambler are kicking off in 42 markets. They start this month for 
six weeks, with traffic hour minutes being used. Frequencies vary 
from market to market. Buyer: Betty Powell. Agency: Geyer, Morey, 
Madden & Ballard, New York. 

Ford Motor Co., Dearborn: Going into markets throughout the 
country with another two-week flight in July for Ford cars. Minutes 
in traffic hours are being set, frequencies will depend on the market. 
Head buyer: Allan Sacks. Agency: J. Walter Thompson, New York. 



SPONSOR 



4 JULY 1959 



y*t last 




mmmmm 









— — °n AM 0nc j Fm 

re ™>Hcable e„ qinee • *** °" ** 

c engineering triurrmk 

,r 5 JUST GREAT 



— pm, direction and full ;«, 

— " T ~ COMPAT '»»sr EREOON 



AM 1270 




KPJZ 



fM 97.1 




REPRESENTATIVES 







MEDIA 
BASICS 




IN USE 18JULV 



WIRE SPACE RESERVATION TODAY 



CBS RESEARCH 

[continued from page 29) 

7. "Company D has been slipping 
in sales lately, and is desperately try- 
ing to regain its position by loud, big 
promises." 

Channel 2, 6%; channel 4, 6%; 
channel 7. 11 r '< ; all others, 77%. 

8. "Company A manufactures an 
excellent product which they have 
advertised very effectively. They have 
developed a reputation for honesty 
and reliability." 

Channel 2, 58%; channel 4, 28%; 
channel 7, 6%; all others, 9%. 

The technique of the surveys was 
questioned by most of the indepen- 
dent tv station spokesmen interviewed. 

Mary McKenna, director of re- 
search and sales development for 
\\ NEW-TV (channel 51, New York, 
charges the questions "were without 
doubt the 'status seeker' type of 
thought implantation. The old story 
about 'everybody reads the New York 
Times , but seems to buy the Daily 
News applies here." The questions, 
rather than being objective, were 
"leading — the type designed to im- 
plant thought attitudes." 

Another point made by Mrs. Mc- 
Kenna: Including a phrase "You 
may name more than one station" is 
typical of questionnaires of this kind 
and allows the normal number of sta- 
tion mentions because "virtually all 
people in any market look at all chan- 
nels available."' But the CBS survey 
allowed mention of only one channel 
and "this technique forces an ab- 
normal choice of station." 

She also questions the area of com- 
mercial believability and describes it 
as "being at variance with most 
studies made along these lines" She 
refers particularly to one conducted 
for WNEW by Advertest. 

This survey showed more than 
SO' i of the people surveyed did not 
think of honesty and reliability in 
connection with commercial copy (as 
measured by their reaction to 10 
image questions I . She made this con- 
clusion : people can respond to specif- 
ics better than to generalities. \et the 
CBS o&o study — a general one — 
records a small 1.2' < as "don't 
know"' or "no answer." 

She adds: "All of the weight of 
an entire network is presumed to 
have a total bearing on an individual 
commercial whether positioned in 
network time or local time. Average 




MORE OF OUR 
LISTENERS.. 



More different families listen 
daily and weekly to WCAU thart' 
to any other station in town.* So 
if you sell insecticides, choose 
the station that most effectively 
sprays the entire Pennsylvania 
vacation area. Remember, when 
Philadelphians head for the 
Poconos, they never go alone. 
WCAU's 18 top local personali- 
ties go along. Whatever you sell 
— soup, soap or silk stockings — 
don't get stung with a large sum- 
mer inventory. Get the biggest 

bite of the market with WCAU.. 

• 

*L*TEST CUMULATIVE PUL3E ANALYSIS. 

WCAU RADIO PH.LA0ELPH, 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



53 



listening share on all regular surveys 
indicate Channel 2 is the most viewed 
station in New York than in Los 
Angeles. The media truth is that all 
channels are viewed by almost all of 
the tv homes in the market, some 
more frequently than others. For 
the buyer, the important question is 
what percent of that station total 
viewing can his client purchase with 
his weekly budget." 

The indies concede that the net- 
works have superior programing, 
production and star values. But they 
contend a re-run of a network show 
has no less appeal on a non-net sta- 
tion than it had originally on the net- 
work. Fred Thrower, president of 
WPIX, New York, says 75% of his 
program product is network re-runs 
— "most of them from CBS." And 
he contends most people don't know 
— and don't care — what channel they 
tune to. 

Mr. Thrower agrees with Mrs. 
McKenna's point that people are 



"status seekers" and will tend to up- 
grade their image of themselves in 
reporting on their tune-in habits. In 
addition, he says "They're much 
more likely to remember names like 
Bob Hope or Perry Como than they 
are the names of performers in non- 
star shows." 

Pointing again to the fact that 
viewers are confirmed dial switchers, 
he notes results of a survey conducted 
by A. C. Nielsen a year ago. 

In the hours between 7 and 9 p.m. 
Sunday through Saturday, Nielsen in 
checking the two outlets concluded 
"none of the comparisons yielded a 
significant difference." Here's what 
they found: home ownership, 43% 
of the WPIX audience owned their 
own home, 45% of WCBS-TV; size 
of family, 51% with four members 
or more for channel 11, 47% for 
WCBS-TV. There was no more than 
a four-point differential between net 
and indie. 

Thus audience characteristics can 



MILWAUKEE? NEW HAVEN? 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 

JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 



Population 1,520,100 

Households 423,600 

Consumer Spendable Income 

$1,761,169,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 



Drug Sales $ 40,355,000 

Automotive Sales $ 299,539,000 

General Merchandise $ 148,789,000 

Total Retail Sales $1,286,255,000 



KNOE-TV AVERAGES 78.5% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to April 1959 ARB we average 78.5% share of audience from Sign On to Sign Off 
7 days a week. During 361 weekly quarter hours it runs 80% to 100%, and for 278 weekly 

quarter hours 92% to 100%. 



KNOE-TV 



CBS • A B C 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 

Photo: International Paper Company's Natchez Mill. Natchez, Mississippi, which produces 
dissolving and paper pulp. 



be the same for a network and an in- 
dependent station. The difference is 
basically one of quantity (the num- 
ber of families tuned in and the fre- 
quency) rather than one of quality 
(higher earners, bigger families, 
etc. ) . 

John R. Vrba, vice president for 
sales at KTTV, Los Angeles, and 
Larry Markes, advertising director of 
WNTA, New York, commented on 
commercial quality on independent 
stations. 

Said Mr. Markes: "If you go out- 
side these major markets, you'll find 
the CBS affiliate has the same kind 
of local commercials which the inde- 
pendents in New York and Los An- 
geles have." National advertising, 
generally, is superior in quality to 
that of local clients. Many indepen- 
dents, with more time to fill because 
they don't pick up programs and 
revenue from the networks, are com- 
pelled to scramble for local business 
which major-market net affiliates 
might not want because they don't 
need it, he said. 

But Mr. Vrba says his station and 
many other independents have just as 
rigid editorial acceptance standards 
as any network affiliate. And Fred 
Thrower says his are more rigid, 
adding "We don't take bra and girdle 
advertising, or products such as 
Preparation H or mail order." 

The networks claim independents 
have successfully obscured network 
station identification in many areas. 
Said one network spokesman: "In- 
dies don't want a network station to 
keep the image it has, and they want 
people to be confused as to where 
they saw what. 

One ad manager of a tv client com- 
pany, commenting on the battle lines 
which the indies are drawing, gives 
his overlook position which may well 
typify that of his sponsor colleagues. 

"I hope this puts all of the stations 
on their mettle! The net stations 
should justify their high prices (in 
New York, a network 20-second prime 
spot slot costs $8,000; the same time 
on an indie, $2,000) and many of 
the indies should clean up their com- 
mercial schedules! 

"I think healthy competition is 
good for all of them. It's very en- 
couraging to see ABC come into the 
ranks and give the other nets a run 
for their money. And I like to see 
the independents scrap for quality 
as well as effective sales." ^ 



54 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



WLOS-TV - 

FIRST in the Carolina Triad ! 

All measurement surveys show that WLOS-TV is 
FIRST in the Carolina Triad in delivering the 
audience for your product or service at a low, low 
CPM. Get all the facts from your PGW Colonel. 



' 



.. 



VIRGINIA 





NORTH 
CAKOUNA 



ASHEVILLE, N.C. 




GRKNV.LLE, SPARTANBURG, 
S.C. SC ' 



SOUTH 
CAROLINA 





WLOS-TV 



towering new force in Southeastern TV 

Unduplicated ABC in 
Greenville • Asheville • Spartanburg 

WLOS AM-FM 



Represented by: Peters, Griffin, Woodward, Inc. 
Southeastern Representative: James S. Avers, Co. 




SPONSOR • I JULY 1959 



55 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA (and western Nevada) 



BEELINE 

RADIO 

dUlu>ets ivime 



McClatchy's Reno station, KOH, covers one of 
the nation's most diversified recreational areas. 
Superb hunting and fishing begin practically 
at the city limits. Water sports? Lake Tahoe is 
just one of the nearby lakes. Winter sports? 
The 1960 Winter Olympic site, Squaw Valley, 
is just one of the excellent areas nearby. All 
these attract and hold people with a surpris- 
ingly large amount of money to spend. And 
you can sell them on Beeline radio. 

Purchased as a group, Beeline stations give 
you more radio homes at a lower cost per 
thousand than any combination of competitive 
stations . . . lower by far. (SR&D and Nielsen) 




Fishing is good in the Truckee River, downtown Reno. 



N \ 

KBEE ° MODESTO 
KMJ O FRESNO 

) \ 

KERN ° BAKERSFIEID 



/lAcGUxiduf f3A60u£c**iuu} Co*«f>aA«4f 




SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 
PAUL H. RAYMER CO., NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



56 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 




SPONSOR ASKS 

(continued from page 19) 

m\ opinion is better liaison between 
the agencies and the stations. 

The "Dear Mr. Promotion Man- 
ager" form type letter is the quickest 
ua\ I know not to get much co- 
operation from the station's promo- 
tion department. The average pro- 
motion manager is working very hard 
these days to try to give clients the 
best possible promotion effort. But 
ofttimes the same form letter asking 
for jumbo mailers, wires, gimmicks. 
etc. is sent to the promotion manager 



Don't make 
demands on 
stations that 
don't get your 
business 



with one I.D. a week as is sent to the 
station guys that received a nice 
chunk of revenue. If the station did 
not get a large schedule, there should 
be fewer demands. It is very pleasant 
to get an occasional request for pro- 
motion that is in line with the amount 
of business placed on your station. 

Personal station visits from agen- 
cy personnel seem to be on the up- 
swing as of late and this generally 
pays off. If a new product is being 
introduced in a market or a large 
nation-wide promotional campaign is 
being set up, there is real value in 
a personal visit. It gives the promo- 
tion manager an opportunity to set 
forth his ideas and opinions and, at 
the same time, get a good idea of 
what the agency would like to do. 
Too, he can explain his markets pe- 
culiarities and make valid sugges- 
tions. For instance, maybe jumbo 
mailers are well received in Norfolk 
and Oshkosh — But shelf talkers are 
better in New Orleans and Denver. 

Promotion is certainly asserting 
itself in the broadcast field these 
days and promotion managers are be- 
coming more and more important to 
their organizational structure. The 
Broadcast Promotion Association 
started a few years ago has proved 
its value. It has given promotion 
people an opportunity to swap knowl- 
edge and has greatly emphasized pro- 
l motion's importance in the broadcast 
industry. ^ 




WCAU 

FEEDS MORE 
FAMILIES... 

490,900 a day! More different 
families daily and weekly than 
any other station in town.* When 
Philadelphians head for the pic- 
nic grounds during the summer, 
they pack along WCAU. While 
they're eating, sell them tomor- 
row's dinner, or a new fishing 
rod, or some high octane gas for 
next week's trip to the Poconos. 
Summertime creates a huge ap- 
petite for goods. WCAU's 18 top 
local personalities can make it 
a picnic for your product! 

•latest cumulative pulse analysis. 
WCAU RADIO PHUOEPHA 

Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 




N^ 



\iA 



SPONSOR 



jii.Y 1959 



:>; 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



TOKEN RADIO is presented to Brig. Gen. Wm. A. Gross by Dan Hydrick, gen. mgr. of 
WGH, Norfolk, who hosted recent FM-Multiplexing meeting attended by over 100 broadcasters 




PAST AND PRESENT merge as WINS, Dayton celebrates its 39th year of broadcasting. Here 
d.j. Johnny Spring publicizes event by donning '90's bathing suit, joining be-modeled surrey 

1. *I ■£> *• »»a~--£"* -■•-■ - '«■ 




AGENCIES 



Bryan Houston, which not so 
long ago was one of Madison 
Avenue's more thriving shops, 
lost its identity this week via the 
merger with Fletcher Richards, 
Calkins & Holden, Inc. 

The last two client exits that pre- 
ceded the Houston merger: Dristan, 
to Tathum-Laird, and Nescafe, to 
Esty. a total of $17 millions. 

Houston himself joins the merged 
operation but William R. Hillebrand, 
president, will move elsewhere. 

Latest estimated billing of FR, 
C&H: $45 million. 

Agency appointments: Hambro 
Automotive Corp's Austin line, billing 
$75,000 plus, from the McCarty Co., 
to J. M. Mathes . . . Georgia Shoe 
Manufacturing to Harris and Wein- 
stein Associates, Atlanta . . . Miles 
products, new products division, to 
Henderson Advertising, Green- 
ville, S. C. . . . XETV, Tijuana-San 
Diego, to William Nietfeld & 




TO SEE THE SEA, agcy. execs, clients and 
reps come out for WRCA and WRCA-TV, 
New York's fifth annual boat ride. Raffle win- 
ner turned down mermaid for $50 cash award 




'59 FORD goes to Mrs. A. H. Burg for 
naming hit tune. Presenting keys I to r: 
Peter Boyson, WLOL, St. Paul, co-sponsor 
Red Owl Stores' Pat Collins, Chas. With 



SPONSOR 



4 JULY 1959 



Assoc, San Diego . . . Carlsberg 
Breweries, for its Western regional 
advertising, to Cole Fischer & 
Rogow, Beverly Hills . . . Bunny 
Bear, Inc., Everett, Mass.. juvenile 
accessories, to Hoag & Provandie, 
Boston. 

New Miami agencies: Spencer Hill, 
formerly associated with Maxon and 
JWT, and Joseph Lincoln, former 
media director for Y&R, New York, 
have joined to form Hill & Lincoln 
. . . Ben Robert Drake, former sales 
account executive at WBKB, Chicago, 
has formed his own agency, Drake 
Advertising. 

New branch office: John W. 
Shaw opening an office in Los 
Angeles, with Jack Schulter as man- 
ager. 

Personnel realignment at Guild, 
Bascom & Bonfigli: 

• Media director Lyn Gross as- 
sumes administrative head of media 
in San Francisco. Media buying and 
other activities for accounts serviced 



in branch offices, will be handled b\ 
those offices. 

• New appointments: Frank 
Gianatassio to media director, New 
York; William Franklin to creative 
administrator, San Francisco: Rich- 
ard Tvler to coordinating account ex- 
ecutive for Ralston: George Allen to 
office manager and Karl Gruener tv 
show procurer, Hollywood, and Dave 
Fullmer to head tv commercial pro- 
duction. 

Personnel moves: Jon Dintle- 
man, radio-tv director, Wentzel & 
Fluge, Chicago . . . John Fleming 
Ball, from CBS TV to JWT's tv 
department . . . Otis L. Wiese, crea- 
tive review committee, Leo Burnett 
Company . . . C. M. Grove, media 
director. Van der Boom, Hunt, Mc- 
Naughton. Inc., Los Angeles . . . 
Robert T. Nathe, to director of 
radio-tv programing and production, 
DCSS . . . Nellene Zeis to media 
and research mgr. ; Jacqueline 
Wille, tv time buyer, Pat Gries- 
haber, tv coordinator, and Marianne 
McNeive. media assistant at Krup- 



nick \ Associates, St. Louis . . . 
David J. Hopkins, mgr., Mc-Cann- 
Frickson, Los Angeles . . . Clifford 
Wilson, media director. K&F. De- 
troit . . . Richard S. Hammctt. 
manager of research. Y&R. Chicago 
. . . Olive Lillchei, group bead, 
Compton . . . Ghanning Hadlock, 
radio-tv director. James Thomas 
Chirug & Co. . . . Don Blauhut, 
production head, Parkson Advertis- 
ing, Hollywood . . . Earl J. Ober- 
meyer, account executive: Philip H. 
Cohen, board of directors, SSCB . . . 

They became v.p.'s: Paul Keller, 
Reach, McClinton . . . Bernard J. 
Gross, Edward H. Weiss and Co., 
Chicago . . . Mortimer Berkowitz, 
Jr., and Joseph Henrici, BBDO 
. . . Frank Davies, Cunningham & 
Walsh. 



ADVERTISERS 



Carnation Milk 



(EW,R&R) is 

(ABC) 
after a two-vear hiatus. 



returning to network tv 



DO IT YOURSELF LUAU kits set mood of 
KABC-TV, Hollywood's press preview for its 
"Salute to Hawaii." With Hawaiian miss, 
Arnold Carr, station's asst. publicity director 



WINNER TAKE ALL is motto of d.j. Dick Whittinghill of KMPC, Hollywood, as he collects 
prize 1901 Olds complete with bevy of beauties. Lucky d.j. reaped rewards for beat- 
ing out 27 other record spinners in popularity poll conducted by local soft-drink manufacturers 




ANIMATED SPOT is how TvB sells tv via 
tv. Member stations have contributed more 
than $5,000,000 in time for this on-the-air 
promotion, first of its kind in the industry 





SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



59 




It's committed already for an al- 
ternate week of Sugarfoot, and 
there'll likely be another Carnation 
buy on the same network before the 
new season gets under way. 

Campaigns: 

• Grosset & Dunlap will inau- 
gurate a national children's book 
sales campaign in the fall via ABC 
Radio and the Don McNeill Break- 
fast Club, Mon.-Fri., 9-10 a.m. The 
agency : Friend-Reiss Advertising, 
New York. 

• Dorran's Frozen Pizza 
(through the Zlowe Co.) is launching 
a summer radio campaign pegged to 
a catchy jingle based on "Le Donna 
E Mobile" from Rigoletto. Twelve 
spots per week (60s, 30s, I.D.'s) have 
been placed on WMGM, WINS and 
WMCA, New York stations, with Con- 
necticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland and 
Massachusetts next on the list. 

• Carolina Rice (through Dona- 
hue & Coe) has placed 200 spots per 
week on metropolitan New York radio 
stations to run throughout the sum- 
mer. 

• Vanguard, a new cigarette, is 
being test marketed in Dayton, Ohio, 
by Bantob Products Corporation. The 
cigarette is being promoted via radio, 
tv and print. The agency: H. W. 
Warden Associates, New York. 
Premium: Rinso Blue is offering 
a 12-volume children's "Picture 
Book" encyclopedia, with a national 
campaign supported by tv and print, 
beginning this month and to continue 
through 1960. 

The notion behind the promotion: 
Families with children use 2-3 times 
more detergent than childless fam- 
ilies. 

Thisa V data: On 27 June, Dodge 
celebrated its fifth year for Lawrence 
Welk on ABC TV ... At a meeting 
in Philadelphia, the Delaware Val- 
ley Toy Dealers' Associates at- 
tested to the power of tv to sell toys. 

Kudos: To Paul Hahn, president, 
and John Crowe, senior v.p.. of the 
American Tobacco Co. the Cross of 
Commander of the Royal Order 
of the Phoenix, for promoting the 
development of the Greek tobacco ex- 
port industry, presented by King Paul 
of Greece ... To Don Mitchell, 
General Telephone and Electric presi- 
dent, and chairman of the board of 
(Please turn to page 67) 



60 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



4 JULY 1959 

Copyright l»M 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Madison Ave next week comes under the probing spotlight of the FCC when a 
number of program specialists will be asked what they know about the practice 
among tv networks of tying up program sales with prime time allocations. 

The questioning — part of the FCC's study of radio and tv network broadcasting methods 
— will take place in New York 

Meanwhile back at the Capital the U. S. supreme court handed down a decision that 
should be quite gratifying to stations that have felt the sting of Sec. 315 of the Communica- 
tions Act. 

The decision: WDAY, Fargo, N. D., could not be held libelously responsible for what 
some political candidate said. The court agreed with the station's contention that the law forced 
the granting of time to the alleged libeler and hence the station could not be held liable 
for his statements. 



The Sec. 315 hearings adjourned before the Senate Commerce Committee, 
but the witnesses had to shuttle right back down from New York and elsewhere 
for identical hearings before the House Commerce Committee. 

Only difference will be appearance before the House group of Robert Bicks, Justice anti- 
trust chief, as a part of the Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.) vendetta against the Justice Depart- 
ment. Harris, chairman of the committee, was bitterly critical of intervention (unsuccessful) 
by Attorney General Rogers in the FCC Lar Daly proceedings. President Eisenhower had di- 
rected Rogers to intervene. 

Broadcasting industry witnesses earlier ran into Sen. John Pastore (D., R. I.), chair- 
man of the Senate Commerce communications subcommittee, and his position that a reversal 
of the FCC Lar Daly ruling is the most Congress will do about Sec. 315. This week all but 
one member of the House Commerce subcommittee took that position. 

Pastore's refrain, and that of the Congressmen, is that broadcasters are human, are some- 
times mixed up in politics, have their personal preferences, and so it is safest to keep most of 
Sec. 315 intact. The Lar Daly ruling had no friends, though, and all the legislators appeared 
still to agree that newscasts must be exempted. There was considerable backing for going fur- 
ther to exempt discussion, documentary and special event programs, such as the political con- 
ventions. 



The FCC closed off its hearings into uses of the spectrum between 25 mc and 
890 mc, a part of the band in which all tv and fm, and certain auxiliary broad- 
casting services are located. 

Spokesmen for industrial and mobile uses of the spectrum all pointed to the crowded 
state of the frequencies assigned to them, and all cited the importance of their industries or 
services to the public and to the national defense. None made any direct plea for fm or tv 
space. 

The FM Broadcasters Association, however, argued that their service is coming along 
fast and needs all the space it has. 

The Association of Maximum Service Telecasters asked for more vhf channels, either 
between present channels 6 & 7 (the abode of fm and some non-broadcast services) or above 
present channel 13. AMST said uhf space could be traded. 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



61 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



4 JULY 1959 

Copyrliht ISM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Keep your eye on a new General Foods-Benton & Bowles formula for hitch- 
ing network and spot expenditures to the same program series. 

The new formula is this: In addition to buying Fury Saturday mornings on NBC 
for Post cereals, GF has also ordered syndicated re-runs of the same program for 12 
markets. 

The ITC show, known in syndication as Brave Stallion, has already been ordered ir 
Los Angeles, Sacramento and Lincoln, Neb. Weekday time slots around 6 p.m. are still being 
cleared in nine other markets. 

The formula: 26- week alternate sponsorship buys, with the money coming out of the 
budget that formerly bought announcements for Post. 

Motive for the buy: to capitalize on the network identification of the show, wit! 
re-use to bolster individual markets. 

GF is apparently cashing in on this opportunity. It has a long-standing network sho\ 
which only recently also became available in syndication. 



You can expect tv tape programs to start replacing feature films in a few lo< 
time slots this fall. 

One 90-minute tape show is probably going to be scheduled on late Saturday night pe 
riods on several outlets in October. 

The show, Max Cooper's Winter Baseball, is a 26-week series taped in Cuba and edited 
down to 90 minutes in length. 

For details, see Film Wrap-Up, p. 67. 



Syndication more than ever before is playing a key role this season in the fiscal 
life of the independent station. 

WPIX, New York, for example, enjoyed a 13% January-to-May rise in sales vol- 
ume this year by virtue of a three-pronged use of syndication. 

Here's what the station did: 

1) Programed each night of the week with syndication in thematic blocks for view- 
ing cohesiveness, essential in the 7-station New York market. 

2) Sold combination alternate sponsorships on an impact basis to national advertisers, 
such as Bristol-Myers' Ipana, Sal Hepatica, Bufferin and Ban and to L&M, P&G's Spic and 
Span, and others. 

3) Produced hour-long documentaries for sale to other stations. Without a major field 
force, WPIX sold its Russian Revolution special to 61 U.S. and Canadian outlets and its Cold- 
War-Berlin-Crisis to 52 outlets. 



62 



The announcement this week that two Wall Street investment banking houses 
— E. Eberstadt & Co. and Lazar Freres & Co. — were making an investment in Ziv 
Television Programs, Inc., caused a considerable flow of speculation within the 
trade. 

It was emphasized in the announcement that the transaction involves no change of any 
kind in the management or operation of the Ziv company. And, that Frederick W. Ziv, chair- 
man, and John L. Sinn, president, will retain their present offices and remain substan- 
tial stockholders. 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



Keep in mind that the progress of tv tape in program production is necessari- 
ly a matter accompanied by much trial and error. 

Among non-technical circles, a split of opinion has developed, with some executives con- 
vinced of tape's potentialities, and others ■worried over thorns encountered in early uses of the 
relatively new recording medium. 

One producer told FILM-SCOPE that excessive enthusiasm for tape if not based 
on hard experience might spur a minor reaction against it within a year. 

A West Coast studio man mulling tape conversion pointed out that while there was some 
producer disappointment right now with tape, he expected tape eventually to replace film, but 
the transition might take five years. 

Syndication hopes continue to rely heavily on international business since ex- 
ports often spell the difference between profit and loss on specific shows in indi- 
vidual years. 

Expansions and optimism continued last week with these moves: 

• ITC reported a $600,000 gross in Latin America and the Far East, twice as high as that 
of its predecessor (TPA) in a comparable six-month period. 

• Flamingo will jump into international distribution, with offices set for London. This dis- 
tributor recently became part of the Buckeye Corp. 

However, insiders regard talk of the past few seasons on international sales potential as 
vastly over-rated. 

Misleading factors have been the attempts to compare foreign station lists and tv set 
counts with the U.S. on a one-for-one basis: Actually it's ad and program expenditures that 
count, and these are still everywhere far below U.S. levels. 



COMMERCIALS 

New uses for music are taking an unexpected place in the creative vogues of 
commercials of recent weeks, and agency men have asked music producers to come 
in to give seminars on pre-scoring and other new developments. 

Music Makers, for one, has been visiting Ogilvy, Benson & Mather and Warwick & Leg- 
ler, and demonstration music clinics are on the calendar for Cunningham & Walsh and DCS&S. 



Videotape Productions has come up with a number of new techniques in mak- 
ing commercials that prove tv tape has resources never possessed by either live tv 
or film. 

For instance, time lapse dissolves are being accomplished by rerecording of a series of 
tapes made with a model walking through different sets; the backgrounds appear to dissolve 
into each other. 

Another one: an emphasis technique for visual copy, reminiscent of the old bouncing 
ball idea, is the use of a dancing couple whose movements point out one phrase or word at a 
time. 

Note that for film this technique would require extra steps and costs for opti- 
cals, but with tape the result is instantaneous and any changes that might be need- 
ed are done a few minutes later. 

The use of stylized art backgrounds rather than actual props and locations is 
the latest innovation to be added to the visual-squeeze commercial. 

Muriel Coronella, through Lennen & Newell, is said to be first with the method. 
Incidentally, Transfilm. producers of this commercial, report that they have made a total 
of 50 commercials to-date using the visual-squeeze approach. 

sponsor • 4 july 1959 63 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS INC. 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



64 



SPONSOR HEARS 



4 JULY 1959 Watch for the more aggressive type of tv stations to revitalize the daytime 

c»pyright km sector by stepping up promotion and improving the quality of shows. 

Slight as is the dropoff in daytime audience, these broadcasters are bent not only on stop- 
ping but reversing the trend. (See chart, page 20.) 

BBDO was disturhed last week by NBC TV's disclosure that duPont's anti- 
freeze division will participate in three specials this fall. 

Seems the client hadn't as yet told its field sales force about the tv splurge. 

The report persisted this week that United Airlines, currently with Ayer, has 
become receptive to a change in agency. (American only recently skipped to Y&R.) 

Probable cause for the whole field's restiveness : The singular popularity of jet flights 
has made it imperative to find ways of keeping up the load factors on other types 
of planes in the fleet. 

Several petroleum companies have found themselves booted around on the lo- 
cal scene because stations are making room for Texaco's sponsorship of the NBC News. 

Esso, for instance, got nudged in five situations. In one market it pulled out alto- 
gether, and in the others it either moved to a later spot on the same station or changed 
stations. 

Tv will pour back into newspapers some of the money weaned away from that 
medium. 

The reimbursements will come via the huge sums that will be spent on sizable spot- 
light ads this fall, especially to publicize some 175 specials and such series as Ford's Tv 
Finest on NBC and the debut of Perry Como for Kraft. 

NBC is committed to spend at least $100,000 for the Ford extravaganzas in 
print. 

Madison Avenue, as the result of a recent episode, again is sharpening up this moral: 
If you're well known, and your negotiations for another job become too open, 
you can find yourself so far out on a limb that you have no choice but to move. 

In this particular episode, the agency boss took the position that the negotiation pub- 
licity had become so loud that it was embarrassing the agency with its two top 
clients. 

Tv stations carrying the American Motors spot campaign are, in most cases, 
making sure that dealers are fully aware of what's happening. 

Behind this urge to maintain close dealer channels is a lesson learned from Pontiac. 

During a dealer swing, Pontiac chief Semon E. Knudsen asked some dealers 
what they thought of the tv spot campaign they were getting. The rejoinder was: "What 
campaign?" 

P.S. : Pontiac abandoned spot tv. 

SPONSOR • 4 JULY 1959 




A giant "Super Scooper" of International Minerals 
& Chemical Corporation dredges the mineral so 
vital to national defense phosphate from 
extensive reserves in central Florida, this coun- 
try's richest source. 

In 1958 alone, 4,547,406 tons of this important 
mineral were shipped from the MARKET ON 
THE MOVE — TAMPA-ST. PETERSBURG. 
These Twin Cities of Progress are now 26th 
in retail sales, 26th in automotive sales, 27th 
in drug sales. 

Dynamically progressive . . . dynamically profit- 
able as a buy for you . . . is the STATION ON 
THE MOVE, WTVT . . . first in total share of 
audience* with 38 of the top 50 programs . . . 
with highest rated CBS and local shows. 
* Latest ARB 



station on the move. 

TAMPA - ST. PETERSBURG 
Channel 13 




The WKY Television System, Inc. 

WKY-TV WKY-RADIO WSFA-TV 

Oklahoma City Oklahoma City Montgomery 
Represented by the Katz Agency 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 






FARMER'S DAUGHTER DOES 
EVENING CHORES! . . . 

. . . while Ivy League farm boy waits outside 
in convertible. That's today's picture of our 
bountiful Land of Milk and )Kbney. Yes, 
here's a unique market of small cities and big 
farms . . . 42% rural and 58% urban . . . 
more than 400,000 homes enjoying Channel 
2-CBS television. 

ANY CHORES YOU WANT DONE? 



IRON MT. 



ANTIGO 



MENOMINEE 
MARINETTE 



OCONTO 



@ 



STEVENS PT. 
W 'S- RAPIDS jggp! 

\A/ I B C O N S i N 
APPLETON 




STURGEON 
BAY 



MANISTEE 
Z 



OSHKOSH 



FOND DU LAC 



MANITOWOC 



SHEBOYGAN 



WEST BEND 



I 






THE LAND 
OF MILK 
ANDKONEY 

WBAY ch 2 

GREEN BAY 



66 



SPONSOR • 4 JULY 195? 



WRAP-UP 

(Cont'd from page 60) 

Sylvania, the Young Executives in 
Sales Clubs "Boss of the Year" 

award. 



FILM 



Sponsorship of syndication is on 
the increase this year compared 
to 1957, according to a Ziv study 
of 30 markets. 

In the report, fully sponsored 
shows have climbed from 51 % to 
559! of Ziv shows over the past two 
years. 

Alternate sponsorship also went up 
from 28% to 35%. 

One reflection of the sponsorship 
rise is the relative fall of participa- 
tion-backed programs, which dropped 
from 21% to 10%r. 

Ziv also reported that location pro- 
duction of its syndicated and network 
shows rose from 50% in 1958 to 
60$ at present. 

Sales: Max Cooper's Winter Baseball 



on tv tape sold to \\ 1S\ T\ in Mil- 
waukee. WRVA-TV in Richmond, 
and WOR-TV, New York; sales have 
also been made in Chicago, Los 
Angeles. San Francisco, Salt Lake 
Gitj and Pittsburgh . . . ITC's Ding 
Dong School is reported sold in 66 
markets . . . CNP sales of Cameo 
Theater to WTVT, Tampa; WGEM- 
TV. Quincy; KARK-TV. Little Rock; 
KSHO-TV. Las Vegas; KFXD T\ . 
Wichita Falls; WNEM-TV. Saginaw: 
KCCC-TV. Sacramento; KSD-TV, St. 
Louis: WHIO-TV. Dayton, and 
WPSD-TV. Paducah . . . ITCs Jeff's 
Collie report renewed in 83% of mar- 
kets where initial contracts were near- 
ing expiration. 

Additional Sales: Screen Gems re- 
ports sales of individual features and 
specially tailored packages are flour- 
ishing; latest buyers of various fea- 
ture film groups are KRCA-TV, Los 
Angeles; WWL-TV. New Orleans; 
WXIX-TV. Milwaukee; KSL-TV. Salt 
Lake City: KUTV, Salt Lake City; 
KTVR. Denver: KTVK. Phoenix: 
WRGB-TV. Schenectady; KRON-TV, 
San Francisco: and WCKT. Miami. 



International sales: Fremantle's 
sale of Jungle in Mexico Cit\ brings 
In 7 the total of sponsor sales in that 
market. 

Production: Filmways has entered 

the tv film production field with 21 
Beacon Street, sold for summer to 
NBC T\ . 

Research: MCA reports substantial 

increases in ARB rating for il- Para- 
mount features on seven of the 15 sta- 
tions telecasting them to date. 

Trade notes: Music Makers has 

joined the FPA of New York . . . 
Aura Recording Inc. has taken over 
the facilities of Cpastal Recording in 
New York. 

Commercials: A Dutch studio. 
Joop Geesink Dollywood, specialist 

in stop motion, has appointed Eric 
Pommerance of New York its 1 . S. 
and Canadian representative . . . 
Klaeger Film Productions has com- 
pleted location and studio commer- 
cials for \iagara Starch through 
Lennen & Newell. 



YOU CAN SELL 
ANYTHING 

SUCCESSFULLY 

ONWBC 

TELEVISION 



I WBC TELEVISION DELIVERS THE GOODS. m 

You'll find proof positive on the following pages. Of special interest 
are the success stories from local adv^erti^^nie^^v^ho "count the 
daily results ... using WBC teleyisiioifcforreal selling impacfTMBroacT 
casting is basic whether y^dcie^enmg locally or nationally distributed 
products. WBCJ^wo^r%4twith results"Tilc^1iesE"ev^zdag T jgbaft5 
whylSirsellfrig- campaign -keamplete-wrthoutihe WBC stations. 



_ 



Strictly personnel: Jerry 
Schnitzer of Robert Lawrence Pro- 
ductions to Paris for Revlon location 
shooting . . . Len Kornblum, ITC 
controller, named 1950-60 chairman 
of the Tel-Film Credit Group . . . 
Joining the Ziv sales staff are 
Herbert J. Miller in Chicago and 
Lee Jacoway in Florida . . . Ziv ITP 
international executives departing on 
sales tours include president Edward 
Stern and representative Joel 
Brandel in Europe, v.p. Millard 
Segal in the Far East and v.p. 
Ralph Franklin to South America 
. . . John Maschio to head Bernard 
L. Schubert's new Hollywood office 
. . . New United Artists Associated 
officers include Henry J. Zittau as 
v.p. and treasurer, Herbert T. 
Schottenfeld as v.p., W. Robert 
Rich as v.p., Fred Ih man as v.p. 
and secretary and William Kline, 
assistant secretary. 

More Sales: Ziv reports a 27% in- 
crease in second quarter syndication 
volume over 1958 . . . Stations buy- 
ing CNP's Union Pacific include 
KREX-TV, Grand Junction; WTOC- 



TV, Savannah; WEAU-TV, Eau 
Claire; KARD-TV. Wichita; KSWS- 
TV, Roswell; WKJG-TV, Fort 
Wayne; WPST-TV, Miami; KSLA- 
TV, Shreveport; WSJS-TV, Winston. 
Salem; WDMJ-TV, Marquette; 
WCTV, Tallahassee; WDBJ-TV, Roa- 
noke; WTVY, Dothan, and WCPO- 
TV. Cincinnati. 



NETWORKS 



Voluntary continuing surveys 
conducted by Bruskin Associates 
and Psychological Corp. give tv 
top place on the family totem 
pole. 

Bruskin's poll showed that a cross- 
section of people deem the tv set the 
most important thing they have 
in the home and that the medium 
gives them the biggest satisfaction in 
comparison to other subjects and ac- 
tivities. 

The Psychological Corp.'s probe of 
how people ranged the networks in 
(1) familiarity, (2) "doing the best 
job" and (3) preference. 



NBC TV came out with the highest 
percentages on all three scores. 

In spite of the defection of 19 sta- 
tions (four of them bonus), CBS 
Radio has been able to restring its 
affiliation roster to the point 
where the coverage represents, 
the network says, 92.8% of the 
ratecard. 

The latest stations to walk out on 
CBS are KWKH, Shreveport, and 
KTHS, Little Rock, both under the 
same ownership. (These two stations 
are going along with Radio World 
Wide.) 



Alexander Film, of Colorado 
Springs, hopes to break into tv 
programing field via a news com- 
ment series featuring Mrs. 
Eleanor Roosevelt. 

Format: panel members com- 
menting on typical news clips. A pilot 
will be tv taped in New York 17 
July and peddled to advertisers and 
networks. 

Network tv sales: Armstrong! 




■■■■■ ■ p i 

^67J5lOX3J£ 





.95/ydP»3.98 



YEAR-ROUND BUSINESS BUILDER 

"We only stay on a program 

as long as it develops 
business. Here, WBZ-TV, is 
our contract for 52 weeks." 

SIMMONDS UPHOLSTERING 



INCREASES NICELY COVERED 

"Our volume increase in a recession year was very 

gratifying. The stature of the company was 

considerably enhanced.., hope our association with 

WBZ-TV will continue feamany years." 

JOHN J. REILLY, President 
Emerson Rug Company, Inc. "~ 




TV GREAT ON MAIL ORDER 

'We sold over 600 thermometer^ 

—a $3.98 mail-order item- 
in two weeks on WBZ-TV. Sign 
us up for 6 more weeks." 
SKILL-BUILT THERMOMETER 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE (gWe) STATIj 



Cork Co. (BBDOl, for a 15 mintite 

segment on alternate Thursdays, and 
a one-minute announcement alternate 
Tuesdays, on Top Dollar, CBS TV 
. . . Phillies Cigar, half sponsorship 
of The Russian-American trackmeet 
on NBC TV 19 July. 

On the specials front: Du Font's 
Zerex antifreeze (BBDCO half 
sponsorship of two Milton Berle 
shows and a Jimmy Durante hour 
this fall. 

Tfaisa 'n' data: Arthur Godfrey 

ivill confine himself, this fall, to his 
norning radio series. He will not do 
Person to Person . . . NBC Radio 
las 52.1% of total sponsored time on 
he three radio networks as moni- 
tored by Broadcast Advertisers Re- 
)orts, Inc. For the second consecu- 
tive month ABC has more sponsored 
lours than CBS. . . . ABC TV has 
■ompleted work on a new entrance 
o its Hollywood tv center . . . The 
SBC Fellowship Award for Jour- 
lalistic Achievement to Morton 
i leischner. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Ohio has joined the ranks of 
states having legislation that pro- 
tects broadcasters from being 
legally coerced to reveal the 
source of news information. 

The bill, however, stipulates that 
all commercial stations must maintain 
a record of sources of information 
for six months from the date of 
broadcast of such information. 

The measure becomes effective 26 
August. 

Ideas at work: 

• For the Saints & Sinners Milk 
Fund : KYA, San Francisco, spent a 
full week of fund raising to provide 
free milk for needy children. Among 
the activities : A matinee, where KYA 
played host to some 3,500; an on-the- 
air marathon from a speciallv con- 
structed remote studio and horse- 
drawn milk delivery carts touring the 
area and visiting ad agencies to raise 
funds. 

• WICE, Providence, R. I., is stag- 
ing its third annual "Charity Hole-In- 



One'' tournament, 10-18 Jul>. to raise 

money for the South Side Boys' Club. 
Station will award $5,000 in varied 
prizes to contestants. 

• A record for safety: Promot- 
ing safe, quick disposal of plastii 
bags, WJBW, New Orleans, offered 
a phonograph record for every plas- 
tic bag turned into the studio. The 
result: some 18,000 plastics bags were 
exchanged for records. 

• "Happy Pappy" promotion : 
WSAI, Cincinnati, received 2,330 en- 
tries in its Father's Day promotion. 
The three winners were honored at a 
Father's Day party at Coney Island 
amusement park with dinner, dancing 
and free rides for the whole family. 

• Riding the air waves: When 
the busses stopped running. KDEO. 
San Diego, offered to pay for travel- 
ers riding to work or town. The gim- 
mick: Stranded tra\elers carried large 
signs with KDEO call letters on them. 
Stopping motorists could turn in 
these signs to the studio and receiye 
a free recording for each properly 
endorsed sign they brought in. 

• Password : WOWO, Ft. Wayne. 
promoting its mobile unit news cov- 





: 



1144 




1 9 8.95 /SET 



TRIPLED PREVIOUS YEAR 

jbilt's successes have been so greatly related to 

'Daily Almanac' ! In addition to tripling 
t]ions year's business, in the Fall of '58 we sold 
\ntire production for well into the winter!" 

LEONARD GILMAN, President 
Gilbilt Lumber Co., Inc. 



TOO MANY SALES! 

"lie didn't hare enough 

salesmen to handle the 

tremendous number of leads 

obtained through WBZ-TV" 

SAI.ADMASTER 



VBZ-TV Boston 



pri'Di\-i,-vTi.Ti iiv Tri vviginu anvviiTicmi' primrtrVTrnvf-: in, 



erage, featured free admission to sev- 
eral drive-in theatres to persons who 
knew the password, which was, 
"Perry Steckback," WOWO mobile 
newsman. The word got around with 
both theatres displaying SRO signs 
for the evening. 

• Birth announcement : While 
painting a billboard promoting his 
show on KING, Seattle, d.j. Ray 
Briem was told that his wife was 
about to give birth. Before leaving 
his sign for the hospital. Briem paint- 
ed "Wife having baby today." He 
later returned and painted the happy 
ending, "It's a boy." 



Station purchases : Consolidated 
Sun Ray. WSAI, Cincinnati, from 
Sherwood Gordon . . . Buckley- 
Jaeger Corp. of Conn., WDRC, Hart- 
ford. 

Noteworthy sales: Lake States 
Imports, 13 week schedule, WBBM, 
Chicago . . . The Plymouth 
Dealers Association of Southern 
California, seven news and sports 
buys. KFI and KNX, Los Angeles. 



Opening new office: Keystone 
Broadcasting, in Detroit, Michigan, 
with Edwin Peterson, Jr., gen. mgr. 

Thisa 'n' data: WRVA, Richmond, 
Va., has a new 29-foot mobile unit 
equipped with heating and air condi- 
tioning, a sound treated studio and 
office space . . . WBZ, Boston, and 
WBZA. Springfield, hosted their new 
AM sales reps in Boston with a wel- 
coming party and several surprises, 
including a ride in a police depart- 
ment wagon . . . Rex Rand, president 
of Rand Broadcasting, which op- 
erates WINZ, Miami. WE AT, Palm 
Beach, and WINQ, Tampa, bought 
the Biscayne Terrace and Biscayne 
Plaza hotels in Miami . . . Another 
station that increased news coverage 
during a paper strike, WIL, St. Louis 
. . . Edwin Tornberg has left Allen 
Kender & Co., to go on his own 
as a broker of radio and tv stations 
... 80 radio stations in 27 states 
have requested the Bartell Radio 
Group documentary on juvenile delin- 
quency. The Critical Years. 

Kudos: KMOX, St. Louis, the 



Catholic Broadcasters Association's 
"Golden Bell Award" . . . WRNL, 
Richmond, Va., the Department of) 
Army award for its support of the 
Army information program . . I 
KBOX, Dallas, U.P. International 
award for outstanding news coverage 
in 1958-59 . . . WBZ, Boston, and 
WBZA, Springfield, for their public 
service program, Alcoholism — Publu 
Health Enemy Number Four, to be 
presented by a representative of Gov- 
ernor Foster Furcolo, for the citizens 
of Mass. 



Station staffers: Charles LeMieu> 

Jr., to sales manager, WINS, New 
York . . . Tom Chauncey, president 
and general manager of KOOL, Phoe 
nix, elected to the CBS TV Affiliate 
Stations board of directors . . . Ir> 
Lichtenstein, to station manage) 
and Larry Marks, director of adver I 
tising for WNTA, New York . . . B 
Hamrick, to general sales manager 
KDUO-FM, Los Angeles . . . Juditl 
Lawton, director of sales promotion 
advertising and publicity for KFI 
Los Angeles . . . Milton Ritzlin, tc i 
central auditor for the Balaban Sta 




1 TV-SHOW-2 NEW STORES 

"Owned one drive-in. Started 

advertising on WJZ-TV in Dec. '57 

...by summer '58 we 

opened two new drive-ins." 

R. C. FISHER, Ameche's 
Hambunrer Drive-In 



WJZ-TV TOPS OTHERS! 

'WJZ-TV's program (Ford 'Station Wagon 

Living Shoiv') brought us biggest 

turn-out yet. Response in 11 

other cities couldn't, compare." 

EDWIN A. DANIELS 
Mondawmin Corporation (Shopping Center) 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE @kSf@ ST ATI 



ions . . . Joseph Arciga, merchan- 
Using and promotion director. KALI, 
.os Angeles. 

(fore personnel moves: James R. 

Jrvant to sales promotion mgr., 
A I ) \ K . Columbus, Ca. . . . (iraham 
Richards, national program direc- 
.11. Storz Broadcasting Co. . . . Lor- 
•ie Barofsky, assistant to the man- 
igei of advertising, publicity and 
iromotion, WRCV. Philadelphia, Pa. 
, . . Tom Shaw to sales mgr., KIXZ, 
\inarillo, Tex. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Vdam Young's resignation from 
he RAB this week was not in the 
Uture of a disaffection, but was 
notivated by his desire to use the 
noney on his own projects. 

Young has several industry studies 
n certain areas under way and. since 
i he firm's funds for research-promo- 
iion projects are limited, he had to 
Inake a choice of continuing with 
TAB or diverting the dues to more 
iirgent needs. 



Rep appointments: kl'.W B. Oak- 
land, to the Katz Agency . . . KXYZ, 
Houston, to H-R Reps'. . . KIAC, 
Los Angeles, to Robert E. Eastman 
. . . WHAT, Philadelphia and the 
Rounsaville Radio Stations iWCIX. 
Cincinnati: YYLOl . Louisville; 
\\ MBM, Miami: WVOL. Nashville; 
WY LD. New Orleans and YYTYIP. 
Tampa-St. Petersburg) to the John 
E. Pearson Co. . . . WR1P, Chatta- 
nooga, to Forjoe & Co. . . . WAOK, 
Atlanta, to Daren F. McCavren . . . 
WADA, Shelbv. N. C. to Grant 
Webb . . . WPEO. Peoria. KDAY, 
Los Angeles, and KIOA, Des Moines, 
to Adam Young . . . WTAX. Spring- 
field, 111., to Gill-Perna. 

Strictly personnel : Jack Davis, to 

executive v.p. of Bernard Howard & 
Co. . . . Dale Stevens, to the Chicago 
sales staff of Robert E. Eastman . . . 
Bob Jones, to the radio division of 
Edward Petn & Co. as salesman in 
Xew York . . . Hunter Bell Jr., to 
the Atlanta office of PGW as a tv 
account executive . . . Dorothy 
Nicholls, to the research staff of 
Blair-TV . . . Robert Sommerville, 



t\ account executive, PGW, San Fran- 
cisco . . . William Crumbley, re- 
search-marketing, \\ eed . . . Sal Ago- 
vino, radio sales staff, H-R . . . 
David Harris, account executive, 
Meeker. New ^ oik. 



TV STATIONS 



WBBM, Chicago, the station 
where tin* issue exploded, pro- 
duced a special dealing with Sec- 
tion 315 and the FCCs latest 
ruling on this equal time hot 
potato. 

Tape episodes included interviews 
with FCC commissioner Fred Ford. 
Sen. Vance Hartke I D. Ind. i . \\ illiain 
Price, executive secretary of the 
United Independent Socialist Com- 
mittee, and Richard S. Salant. CBS 
corporate v.p. 

Triangle's Roger Clipp took the 
lead in a New York conference 
last week to urge that tv stations 
do a lot more than they have in 
promoting color tv. 

Clipp said that color has an "enor- 





ORES CLAMOR FOR COOKIES 

« media t, and tori tic response to 
WJZ-TV preview of cookies. 
•'i ml ivas so great wc had to start 
istribiition ahead of schedule." 

A. VINTON FEETE 
iddemeirer Co. Inc., for Maryland Biscuit Co. 



IMMEDIATE REACTION NOW IN EVERY CHAIN! 

'From the moment Dob-A-Loop appeared "In just one mouth, received 9,000 coupons 

on WJZ-TV, there arose from WJZ-TV offer, 

an immediate reaction for the toy Instead of poor distribution, product 

at every store." now in every chain!" 

ROBERT HYATT. V. E. Azrael Advertising CHESTER G. WHITE, White's Service Sales. Inc. 

for Romeo Enterprises (Toys) for Original Crispy Pizza 



VJZ-TV Baltimore 



mous potential" for sales and all that 
this sort of aggressive promotion 
would cost is time and energy. 

TvB's Norman Cash, who partici- 
pated in the color pep rally along 
with RCA. NBC. appliance people 
and others, noted: 

• Rather than coasting on the 
highest billing levels our industry has 
ever imagined, tv must use color, as 
newspapers and magazines already 
do. 

• With more than 10 million sets 
ready for the junk heap. 2.500.000 
more homes would use tv in the day- 
time, if these homes alone were con- 
verted to color. 

• There exists a potential increase 
of $70,000,000 in gross income from 
advertisers who are now spending 
their dollars where color is available 
to them. 

The board of directors of Trans- 
continent Tv Corp. elected four 
new directors and a v.p. at its 

meeting just after formal arrange- 
ments had been made for Transconti- 
nent to acquire the stock of Marietta 
Broadcasting. 



New directors: Jack Wrather, 
president, Jack Wrather Organiza- 
tion; Monte Livingston, executive 
v.p., Wrather Organization; Edward 
E. Voynow, president, Edward Petry. 
and Walter Walz, associate, Loeb. 
Rhoades & Co., New York. 

New v.p. : George Whitney, former 
v.p. of Marietta Broadcasting, Inc. 

Ideas at work : 

• On the ball: WRCV-TV, is 

distributing packages which contain 
three golf balls to agency men, with 
this greeting: "Have a ball this sum- 
mer, compliments of a Philadelphia 
friend." 

• Bearing up: Having paid trav- 
el expenses for a polar bear cub from 
Alaska to the National Zoo, WMAL- 
TV, Washington. D. C, is conduct- 
ing a name the cub contest for young- 
sters. The prize: an eight-day vaca- 
tion in Alaska. 

Station purchases: Connecticut 
TV Corp. (W. L. Putnam. Harrj 
Balaban. Herbert Sheftel principals I . 
WNBC-TV and WKNB. New Britain, 
from NBC. 



New affiliate: WAVY-TV, Ports- 
mouth, Va., with NBC TV. 

Thisa 'n' data: TvB noted in a re- 
lease last week that Tv's gain of 
$89,870,998 in '58 over '57 in net 
and spot billings wiped out a loss of 
$52,006,297 recorded by other media 
and was responsible for the $37,864,- 
701 increase in the top 100's total 
billing . . . WOR-TV, New York, 
will telecast winter baseball and 
award cash prizes to outstanding 
players . . . The recently published 
The Art Director at Work contains a 
section on tv art. The contributors: 
William Duffy, senior art director, 
McCann-Erickson; Edward Bennett, 
mgr. of design and art, NBC TV; 
John Hubley, Storyboard, and Chris 
Jenkins, story editor, Playhouse Pic- 
tures, Hollywood . . . Based on the 
April 1959 Nielsen report for New 
York, WABC-TV, claims that near- 
ly 87% of all homes in the New York 
area watch their nighttime programs 
every week . . . WCBS-TV, New 
York, claims the largest audience ever 
for its Late Show, 722,000 nightly 
. . . WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, is is- 




i 



.2 S I arm 



BIGGEST SALES IN 40 YEARS 

'KDKA-TV gave us the greatest sales 

in our 40 year history 

—and cost less per sale than any 

other major campaign!" 

MARVIN AND JERRY JOSEPHS 
King's Clothes, Inc. 



BASIC BUYING HABIT CHANGED-IN WEEKS! MILK DRINKERS UP SALES 10% 



'•KDKA-TV pushed the 'Family' 

loaf for a month— noiv 

it's the outstanding leader in 

the Tastcmastcr line." 

LARRY ROTHMAN, S. Laurence Rothman 
Company for Vienna Baking Company 



"KDKA-TV 's large and 

loyal audience has increased 

milk-drinking to the 

time of 10% in over-all sales.' 

B. FRIEDMAN, Friedman & Rich 
for Beverly Farms Milk 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE ™ 



.-fig) STATIC 



suing a brochure to publicize the lat- 
est Philadelphia ARB findings that 
!!()'< of their audience is adult . . . 
Richard Hogue, v. p. and gen. mgr. 
KXTV, Sacramento, presented an 
$8,000 check to KVIE gen. mgr. 
John Crabbe, as part of the former 
station's continued support of Sacra- 
mento educational tv. 

Personnelities: Bob Lyte, named 
promotion director, WWL-TV, New 
Orleans . . . KXTV, Sacramento, an- 
nounced the appointment of John 
Osborn to commercial mgr. and 
Monas Bachman to mgr. in charge 
of promotion and research . . . Clint 
Youle, is retiring as TV weatherman. 
\\ NBQ, Chicago . . . Harry Scott, 
to sales representative. KYW-TV . 
Cleveland . . . Bruce Beiswenger, 
to chief film editor for WROC-TV. 
Rochester . . . H. Harold Powell. 
national sales coordinator, WIS-TV. 
Columbia. S. C. 

Resignations: Miller Robertson, 
from manager of KIRO-TV. Seattle 
. . . George Kapel. from gen. sales 
mgr. of KXTV. Sacramento. ^ 



PEET PACKING 

[continued from page 35 ) 

it's a rare week when we don't get a 
request for his appearance at some 
Michigan club or group. Since he has 
been working with us, Malone has 
spoken at Kiwanis and Lions Clubs, 
Chamber of Commerce functions, and 
appears at state grocer conventions. 
Besides making regular plant visits, 
he is often at sales meetings." 

Additionally, Malone has repre- 
sented Peet at such events as the Na- 
tional Cherry Festival in Traverse 
City and the Silver Valley Winter 
Sports Carnival at East Tawas. 

Such appearances are not only 
sound merchandising but tie in with 
the theme of the show as well. As 
"Farmer Peets Roving Reporter," 
Malone spices his show with tapes of 
a presidential inauguration, Margaret 
Truman's wedding in Independence 
a trip through the Panama Canal, a 
European junket, etc. The merchan- 
dising junkets around Michigan take 
on added importance and interest be- 
cause of the larger scale peripatetic 
nature of the show. Says Parker. 
'"At the Cherry Festival, we had clear 



evidence from crowd comments that 
it was "Farmer Peets Roving Re- 
porter' even though the car h as 
marked only 'Ted Malone." 

This integration of Malone into 
the Michigan scene has not hurt his 
value as a 'national' image for the 
Peet brand. "Recently," says Parker, 
"we surveyed 2,100 women, asking 
them to name their favorite national 
brand. Fifty-six percent gave Farmer 
Peet as their preference." 

The 75-year-old Peet Packing Co. 
operates three plants in Michigan — in 
Chesaning, Bay City and Grand 
Rapids — with branches in Battle 
Creek, Lansing, Jackson, Ypsilanti, 
Flint, Cadillac and Gaylord. The 
Malone show is aired in Pontiac, 
Flint, Saginaw, Bay City, Lansing, 
Jackson, Battle Creek, Ann Arbor, 
Kalamazoo, Owosso, Grand Rapids, 
Muskegon, Traverse City, Cadillac, 
Petoskey, Gaylord, Alpena, Sault Ste. 
Marie and Alma-Mt. Pleasant. 

"Ratings and sales have climbed 
simultaneously in markets where sur- 
veys are available," Says Parker, 
"repeating the pattern we noted in 
the nine original markets." ^ 







mW .3 \3 ■ ! «5 mm 9 



CARLOADS OF COCOA MARSH 

'roof of KDKA-TV s selling power? Look 

at the carloads of Cocoa Marsh 
•r shipped into Pittsburgh after the mail 
response to the offer on KDKA-TV." 

MALCOLM P. TAYLOR 
Taylor-Reed Corporation 



40% MORE BUSINESS 

"KDKA-TV came through with 

.dying colors— increased business 

more than £0' i orer any 

previous engagement here." 

DICK FORTUNE 
Ice Capades 



$1.00 IN TIME. ..$20 IN SALES! 

"KDKA-TV is our greatest pull. 

]Ve get *2(> in appliance sales for every $1 sp< nt 

on KDKA-TV... plus indirect good 

will and sales in other departments." 

MEL LANDOW. Vice President 

Kelly & Cohen 



KDKA-TV Pittsburgr 

^_^^^^_ REPRESENTED BY TELEVISION A I) V ERTlSINi ; REPRESENTATIVES. IM'.^^^ 



CIGARETTES 

{continued from page 31) 

Like chewing gum, candies, beer, 
there isn't much to say about a cigar- 
ette brand beyond taste and enjoy- 
ment. Like soaps or detergents, one 
cigarette package (whether soft pack 
or flip-top box) looks about as ap- 
pealing as another. At the retail level, 
they get no strong personal support 
such as an appliance or automobile 
gets from the showroom salesman. 

Across the country, cigarettes are 
sold in about 400.000 grocery stores, 
300,000 cafes, 300.000 general stores, 
tobacco and candy shops. In many 
of these places — especially the eating 
and drinking places — they are sold 
through vending machines. So they're 
strictly on their own, in stiff compe- 
tition (20 top-selling brands account 
for about 90% of all cigarette sales) , 
and it's "customer's choice." 

Thus the cigarette industry is 
forced to spread its advertising over 
all media. This fact alone, practical- 
ly guarantees that the romance with 
radio will last. 

Another guarantee lies in an analy- 
sis of the cigarette business itself. Tt 



continues to grow bigger and bigger 

despite the most vicious attacks and 
bad publicity ever piled up by anv 
business. 

I nited States Tobacco Journal, 
weekly magazine of the business, re- 
ports that trade consultant Harry M. 
Wootten's annual analysis of the in- 
dustry showed cigarette sales in 1958 
increased 5% — the biggest peacetime 
advance for the industry in 20 years. 
The per capita consumption (persons 
over 15 years of age) last year was 
estimated at about 3,575 cigarettes 
( about 180 packs I . Highest per capi- 
ta of a previous year was 3,509 cigar- 
ettes in 1952 — just before the "health 
scare.'' The U. S. Department of 
Agriculture forecasts a further in- 
crease in cigarette consumption for 
1959. 

Tobacco is just about America's 
oldest industry, important to the 
economy for more than 350 years. It 
supports about 800.000 growers 
alone, contributes about $2.5 billion 
yearly to tax coffers (the Federal 
Government alone gets about two- 
and-one-half times as much in taxes 
as all the tobacco farmers get for 
their crops). Federal excise tax on 



cigarettes is 8^ per pack, on top of 
which 44 states impose taxes ranging 
from 2^ to 8^, not to mention some 
250 municipalities. To meet these 
taxes, cigarette companies must bor- 
row huge sums of money in advance 
of production. So it is easy to see 
that they cannot afford to relax on 
advertising; when sales dip, they are 
really in a hole. 

The entire tobacco industry is di- 
vided into four kinds (1. cigarettes: 
2. cigars; 3. snuff and chewing; 4. 
pipe tobacco) and represents about a 
$6.5 billion volume annually. Cigar- 
ettes account for about $4 billion of 
this. Last year, snuff and chewing 
tobacco sales were down; pipe to- 
bacco, cigars, cigarettes all were up. 

But while cigarette smoking is defi- 
nitely on the increase, total industry 
figures are splintered by the variety 
of product and package types. Only 
a few-years ago, the filter cigarette 
accounted for only about 2% of the 
market. Menthol cigarettes, two years 
ago, claimed less than 5% of the 
market. Today, according to United 
States Tobacco Journal, the picture is 
this: filters account for 38% of cig- 
arette sales; regulars, 33%; non-filter 




;ci STATION 



king size, 20'/( ; menthol-flavored, 
9%. 

The market by now is so divided 
by types, that no cigarette company 
ran afford to give ground on any of 
its major brands (companies that 
used to have only one major brand to 
support now have two and three), or 
the competition will move in before 
the last announcement fades away. 

In such an atmosphere, only the 
uiants do well, and since it is only 
the giants who use radio heavily and 
consistently anyway, the future of air 
time sales to cigarette companies 
looks as healthy as the present. 

Here is a company -by -company 
look at the five leading cigarette pro- 
ducers and what they are doing in 
radio advertising. 

Liggett & Myers: In first quarter 
1959, according to RAB, spent $1,- 
I 10.221 in spot radio, to put it at 
head of the list. Last year, invested 
in spot radio a total of $2.7 million. 
The three cigarette brands of this to- 
bacco company getting heaviest play r 
are, in order of rank: L&M, Chester- 
field and Oasis. In network radio. 
Liggett & Myers is con-sponsor of 
Stardust Pack on NBC, getting its 



announcements aired about 85 times 
per week; has been in and out of 
Mutual. 

Output of this company s three 
leading brands in 1958 was: L&M, 
25.9 billion cigarettes; Chesterfield. 
18.6 billion cigarettes; Oasis ("Oasis 
takes you away from the everyday"), 
1.1 billion. The company itself was 
the third largest producer with an 
all-brand total output of 65.5 billion. 
R. J. Reynolds: Invested $898,063 
in spot radio during first three 
months of this year for three brands: 
Camel. Winston and Salem. In 1958 
spent about $4,700,000 in spot radio, 
according to RAB estimate — about 
double what they invested in spot tv. 

Is very active in network radio. 
On NBC, sponsors Morgan Beatty's 
News of The World Monday through 
Friday from 7:30 to 8 p.m., is going 
to Monitor newscasts over 4 July 
weekend. On ABC. has 5-minute 
shows 23 times a week. On CBS, is 
a full sponsor of Answer Please Mon- 
days through Fridays; is co-sponsor 
of 7 a.m. strip Monday through Fri- 
day {Rusty Draper and Ned Calmer) 
and of Sports Time Mondays through 
Saturdays. On Mutual. Reynolds uses 



8-second adjacencies l<> newscasts and 

announcements in baseball games. 

Here is how the three advertised 
brands of R. J. Reynolds did last 
year: Camel, 63.5 billion cigarettes; 
Winston. 12.5 billion; Salem, 19 bil- 
lion. Reynolds is second largest U. S. 
cigarette producer with a total of 132 
billion turned out last vear. 
F. Lorillard Co.: Invested neaib 
$651 thousand in spot radio between 
January and March this year by R \I> 
estimate. Last year, the same source 
reveals this giant spent $1.2 million 
in the same medium. In network uses 
Mutual on an irregular basis. 

The brands being pushed by this 
firm are: Kent, Old Gold and New- 
port. Two years ago this compam 
was at low ebb with a total produc- 
tion of only 21.7 billion cigarette out- 
put. They have effected the most 
brilliant comeback, bouncing up to 
total production of 52.2 billion last 
year; they might be called the living 
example of the tobacco industry's 
resilience. Kent filters sparked the 
comeback with 36 billion sold last 
year. Old Gold filters sold 5.5 bil- 
lion; Old Gold Kings, 1.9 billion; 
Old Gold regulars, 5.4 billion. New- 




125 /RIDE 



ONE SPOT. .3000 REPLIES! 

"Did you cast a spell around Ohio? 

Over 3,000 of your KYW-TV 

viewers responded instantly— more 

thbn we received from any other city." 

SHEILA McKEON 
Brown & Rowland, Inc. for "Q-Tips" 



SALES-A-POPPIN 

'•Using KYW-TV exclusively, 

our sales show av 

increase of 40' ', over 

last year's figures." 

PEGGY MILLER. Radio-TV Media Director 

LustiK Advertising for Squirt 



BIGGEST CROWD EVER 

"Last Wednesday we had the largest 

crowd, greatest return 

in 53 years... and our only 

advertising teas on KYW-TV." 

R. M. ANDREAS. Manacer 
Puritas Spring Park Co. 



KYW-TV Cleveland 



REPRESENTED BY TELEVISION ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES. INC 



port output was 2.6 billion. 
American Tobacco Co. : The grand 
old friend of radio (Jack Benny and 
the George Washington Hill-inspired 
commercials) which has been pro- 
ducing Lucky Strike cigarettes since 
1916. The first three months of this 
year, American Tobacco placed about 
$596,792 in spot radio for four 
brands: Lucky Strike, Pall Mall, Hit 
Parade, and the new dual-filter Tarey- 
ton introduced last fall. During 1958. 
its stake in spot radio amounted to 
$4.6 million. 

Last year, total cigarette output of 
American was 122.4 billion cigar- 
ettes. Pall Mall output was 58 bil- 
lion cigarettes: Lucky Strike. 47.2 
billion; Hit Parade, 3.2 billion; 
Tareytons, 3.5 billion. 
Philip Morris : This year marks the 
25th anniversary of Johnny and his 
"Call for Philip Morris." For some 
time, this character (who came alive 
during the hey-day of network radio ) 
was believed to have been abandoned 
by Philip Morris, but such was not 
the case. In the years of his absence 
from the air waves, Johnny had been 
out with the PM country music show 
and making appearances at state 



fairs. Now he is back in radio. 

Philip Morris spent an RAB-esti- 
mated $394,335 on spot radio in the 
first quarter of this year. The brands 
it currently promotes are: Philip 
Morris, Parliament ("The most im- 
portant i/4 inch in smoking today"), 
Mayfields (previously mentioned as a 
test cigarette on the West Coast), 
Marlboro. The commercials for the 
latter are considered by many as 
gems in cigarette ad strategy since 
they have given the filter a "mascu- 
line" appeal. In 1955 when Marlboro 
filter-tips were introduced, they sold 
6.4 billion. Last year, Marlboro sold 
20.7 billion cigarettes. Here's how 
the other PM line stacks up: Philip 
Morris regular, 7.8 billion; Parlia- 
ment. 6.7 billion cigarettes. 
Brown & Williamson: Smallest 
spot radio spender during first quar- 
ter ($10,754), it has been spending 
from $20,000 to $40,000 a week in 
NBC newscasts for the past two-and- 
one-half years, but is going off as of 
now. Total output for B&W last year 
was 48 billion. The three leading 
brands and how they fared are: Vice- 
roy, 21 billion; Kool, 8.2 billion: 
Raleigh 7.2 billion. ^ 



'QUIZ-PANEL' 

(continued from page 37) 

The Goodson-Todman technique 
with quiz-panels involves a long, slow 
period of program planning and de- 
velopment (it is not unusual for them 
to spend a year on a show r before au- 
ditioning it I and painstaking research 
and improvement by their 100-man 
staff as the show progresses. 

"It takes time to figure out even 
the simplest ideas," says Fates. 
"When we started What's My Line, 
we didn't know how to conceal our 
mystery guests from the panel. We 
tried all sorts of elaborate nonsense 
— special sets, screens, even electronic 
devices — until some bright lad sug- 
gested — why not give the panel mem- 
bers masks? It seems silly that we 
had overlooked this solution, but no 
one had thought of it before." 

Often, the development of a good 
quiz-panel mean pruning away gim- 
micks and gadgets, and making the 
show less complicated. "There's al- 
ways a tendency to be too tricky," 
says Austin. "On Truth, for instance, 
we used to have an electronic machine 
to register audience votes. It was a 
beautiful thing, but it added nothing 







1 I — "* 

m 

) SALI! 



30% OF TOTAL NATIONAL SALES! 



"We doubled our sales 

...sold 30'/( of the company's 

total national 

output in the KPIX area." 

DICK DRURY 
Maggie Magnetic Company (Games) 



900% INCREASE IN 6 MONTHS! 



DOWN GO OTHER MEDIA-UP GO SALI 



"Since starting our campaign on 

KPIX, stores that used 

to sell 2 to 3 cases a month noiv 

sell up to 30 a week!" 

R. F. GUGGENHEIM, D'Evelyn-Guggenheim 
Advertising Agency for Kikko Man All-Purpose Soy Sauce 



"We've cut doivn on other 

media— and still our 

■safes have increased 

25% thanks to KPIX" 

YOUNG BROS. 
Appliances 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE ®fij§) STATION 



to the show, and we junked it." 

On the other hand, the very sim- 
plicity of the quiz-panels sometimes 
brings sneers from visual-minded tv 
"experts." "When we started Se~ 
cret," says Fates, "we were told it 
was nothing but a radio show, and 
that we ought to juice it up with vis- 
ual effects. Fortunately we were 
smart enough to resist." 

The selection of contestants in- 
volves some staggering research and 
production work. Approximately 30' '< 
of the contestants on Line and 20% 
of those on Truth come from mail 
sent into the Goodson-Todman of- 
fices and applicants must be screened 
to eliminate cranks and phonies. 

Getting look-alikes for Truth taxes 
the ingenuity of the five-man research 
team assigned to the show. Once 
when Bud Colliers brother was ap- 
pearing on the program, a G-T re- 
searcher caught a glimpse of a man 
in a station wagon who resembled 
the Truth m.c. A fast check with the 
police department disclosed that the 
car was registered at N.Y. Hospital. 
The hospital, in turn, revealed that it 
had been driven that day by a Con- 
necticut doctor. And a call to Nor- 



walk secured a startled but believable 
Bud Collier double. 

Contestants on G-T shows go 
through elaborate two-hour briefing 
sessions, plus "rehearsals" before 
appearing. For the "rehearsals" sub- 
stitute panels are used, composed in 
the main of bright young actors and 
actresses who, says Fates, "sometimes 
embarrass us by tossing up questions 
that we haven't even thought of." 

One minor, but amusing problem 
which G-T must face is the loyalty 
but conservatism of quiz-panel audi- 
ences. When Zsa Zsa Gabor appeared 
on Line, letters poured in protesting 
that she was not "intellectual" enough. 
And when, to speed up the program, 
the ritual of having contestants shake 
hands with the panel was dropped, 
G-T was berated as "discourteous." 

As to the future of quiz-panel pro- 
grams, G-T believes it is bright, but 
has no immediate plans for addition- 
al shows of this type. "We have steel 
files full of program ideas," says Aus- 
tin, "and we're always ready to move 
in when trouble develops on the net- 
works. But we don't offer shows until 
we're sure of them." 

Incidentally, if vou are bursting 



with what \ou believe is a billion- 
dollar quiz-panel idea, don't send it 
to G-T. They don't accept them in 
the first place, and doubt their oriji- 
inalit\ in the second. "Over 300 peo- 
ple have tried to sell us the same idea 
for a mystery quiz-panel program," 
says Austin. 

In working on new programs, al- 
most everyone at G-T has a hand in 
development and Fates and Austin 
claimed that none of the shows is a 
one-man product. G-T auditions is 
programs live, usually in its own 
offices or those of network executives, 
and hasn't made a kine for a live 
show in five years. Price is Right, for 
example, was auditioned and sold in 
Tom McAvity's office whe he was a 
NBC program executive. G-T sells its 
experience and know-how as much as 
program ideas and performance. 

Production of quiz-panels involves 
headaches, problems, and risks I G-T 
has had to defend scores of nuisance 
suits). But in the hands of experts it 
is obviously a profitable operation. 
The executive dressing room-bath- 
room between Goodson and Todman's 
offices is paneled in. of all things, a 
Pre ni'alitv grey flannel. ^ 




ROCKET LAUNCHED-BY TV! 

"Exceptional results 

...sales took a 

definite rise upon 

our start on KPIX." 

HOWARD K. WHITNEY. Adam-Whitney Company 
(Toy manufacturer) 



ORGAN SPOTS STRIKE 300% CHORD! 

'From a saturation schedule of spots exclusively over 

KPIX for Thomas Electronic Organs, priced from 

$750.. .an increase i)i business of 300' ~/t in the Bay 

Area. So successful it depleted inventory!" 

N. C. TEAK I.E. N. C. Teakle Distributing Company 
Thomas Electronic Oru;ni^ 



KPIX San Francisco 



REPRESENTED BY TELEVISION ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES. INC 



You could ask 



Sherwood J. Tarlow 

PRESIDENT 
Of WHIL BOSTON 

about our World-wide 
Voiced News Service 







but why not call 

international 
transmissions^ 

2 W. 46th ST..N.Y.C. 
COIumbus 5-2400 



1 



NEW YORK 



HOTEL 

WINSLOW 



EAST SIDE 



Madison Ave. 
at 55th St. 

SMART 

MIDTOWN 

LOCATION 



One block from Fifth Avenue's 
famous shopping area. Near 
theatres, Radio City, restau- 
rants, cafes, business and 
cultural centers. Newly deco- 
rated rooms with private 
bath. Free radios. Air-condi- 
tioning and TV available. 

Daily rates from $6.50 single 

from $8.50 double 

Write for descriptive brochure. 





Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 





Donald E. Leonard has been named media 
director for Fuller & Smith & Ross, Inc., 
New York. He was formerly media director 
for W. B. Doner & Co., Baltimore. From 
November, 1954 to March, '56, Leonard 
was broadcast media buyer and supervisor 
with McCann-Erickson, on the Esso Stand- 
ard Oil account. He handled media for 
several accounts with Marschalk & Pratt for 
five years prior to that agency's merger with McCann. Leonard spent 
three years in the Navy, attended Columbia U. School of Bus. Admin. 

Kenyon Brown has been named president 
of the newly formed Broadcast Division of 
National Automotive Fiber, Inc. (NAFI). 
He plans to increase that company's owner- 
ship of broadcast properties to the limit 
allowed by the FCC. Currently president of 
KCOP Tv, Inc., Brown is part owner 
through NAFI of KCOP-TV, L. A.; KFOX, 
Long Beach; KSON, San Diego; KPTV, 
Portland and KITO, San Bernardino. Brown's new executive assist- 
ant at NAFI: James Rue. a Ph.d. in communications from U. S. C. 

John E. Kucera, director of network rela- 
tions at Ted Bates & Co., has been elected 
a v.p. Prior to joining Bates in 1956. 
Kucera spent seven years with the Biow 
Co., Inc., as v.p. in charge of broadcasting 
media. Earlier, he was with Foote, Cone & 
Belding as assistant to Hubbell Robinson, 
then radio and tv director for FC&B, and 
for seven years with Young & Rubicam. 

Kucera attended Yale University and served three years in the Army. 

Appointed assistant v.p.'s: John N. Calley and William E. Watts. 

John F. Dille Jr. has been named presi- 
dent-elect of the U. of Chicago Alumni 
Assn. He is president of Truth Publishing 
Co., publishers of the Elkhart Truth and 
operators of WSJV, South Bend-Elkhart. 
He is also president of Truth Radio Corp. 
(operators of WTRC, Elkhart) ; heads the 
corporation which operates WKJG-AM & 
TV, Ft. Wayne and is v.p. and director of 
the National Newspaper Syndicate, Chicago. Dille received his B.A. 
degree and his M.A. in Communications from the U, of Chicago, 





78 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



How to build better schools 

with corrugated boxes 



Using boxes to build better 
schools was a new challenge 
for Stone Container Corp. The 
challenge had come from the 
Advertising Council. Stone's 
answer was a "package deal". 

What was done ? 

Stone Container knew the aver- 
age carton was seen by hundreds 
of people as it traveled toward 
the market place. If each of the 
hundreds of thousands of car- 
tons they produced carried an 
Advertising Council message — 
the fight for better schools, or 
for fewer accidents and forest 
fires, would indeed be aided by 
a "package deal". 

Stone prepared printing plates 
covering each of these Council 
campaigns: 

ACTION 

Aid to Higher Education 

Better Schools 

Forest Fire Prevention 

Keep America Beautiful 

Religion in American Life 

Stop Accidents 

United Fund Campaigns 

U.S. Savings Bonds 

They offered to print, free of 
charge, the campaign's message 
on cartons ordered by any of 
their clients. Thus, the client 
becomes a contributor to public 
service, too. 

Company benefits 

Two letters describing this pro- 
gram were sent to advertising 
and management executives in 
many companies. This provides, 
according to Norman H. Stone, 
President, a "good opportunity 




to get contacts in depth. Adver- 
tising Council committee mem- 
bers themselves are business 
executives and we accrue some 
benefits from that". 

You, too, can benefit 

You help your company earn a 
better business climate by ty- 
ing in with the Advertising 
Council. The Council offers free 
advertising materials for com- 
pany publications, reproduction 
proofs of advertisements or 
"drop-ins", mats for newspaper 
advertisements, posters for bul- 
letin boards, etc. 

Do what you can to get your 
company to use these materials. 
Or maybe you, like Stone Con- 
tainer, can come up with a com- 
pletely new way to help. Find 
out how you can tie in by send- 
ing the coupon below, or calling 
the Advertising Council branch 
office nearest you. Branches in 
Chicago, Los Angeles and 
Washington, D. C. 

Materials — reproduction proofs, 
posters, radio and TV spots — 
are free. 



THE ADVERTISING COUNCIL, INC., 
25 West 45th Street, _*\* 

New York 36, New York 

Please tell me how I can 
tie in with Council cam- *&, 
paigns — and earn a better 
business climate. 



S73F 



SPONSOR 



4 july 1959 



SPONSOR 



End of the advertising year 

Back in our boyhood, the Fourth of July meant fire- 
crackers at dawn and a day-long orgy of cap pistols, tor- 
pedoes, rockets and Roman Candles. 

Today, in the era of the Safe and Sane Fourth, it means 
for many people a chance to go zooming off unsafely and 
insanely along the nation's highways in the summer's biggest 
weekend. 

But for those of us in the business of radio/tv advertising, 
the Fourth is actually a kind of New Year's Eve. It signalizes 
the end of the old advertising year, the beginning of a new 
advertising season. 

From here on we'll all be thinking of next fall's ratings, 
sales and triumphs. We're ringing down the curtain on what 
was 1958-1959. 

Actually the air media have been responsible for a com- 
plete revolution in the advertising calendar. January 1st has 
lost its meaning for admen. The new season begins now. 

So we're not wishing you a "Happy Fourth" but rather a 
"Happy New Year." 

Cut out the nonsense 

There's no need for us to comment at length on the irk- 
some "equal time" question. 

Recent witnesses in Washington have made it abundantly 
clear that the Communications Act must be revised. 

We want to say only this to Congress: Please act now to 
cut out this "equal time" nonsense. And please, for every- 
one's sake, do it quickly. 

A job well done 

The other day a highly capable man resigned from the 
NAB and received an unusual commendation from its Board 
of Directors. Donald M. Martin, for the past two and a half 
years in charge of NAB public relations is leaving to form 
his own p.r. firm. 

We have enjoyed working with Don and admire the job he 
has done. We wish him well in his new venture. 

THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Continued pressure 
during the season ahead far greater creativity 
in radio/tv. Constant program improvement 
is needed to keep the air media healthy. 



30 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Samaritans: WBAL, Baltimore, em- 
barked on a good-will campaign de- 
signed to help out motorists who 
might get traffic tickets because their 
parking meters had "run dry." WBAL 
personnel went out depositing coins 
in run-out parking meters, leaving 
under the windshield wipers of the 
cars notes reading, "We noticed your 
meter had run out ... so we dropped 
some change in it for you. We don't 
like to get tickets either." The police 
department called a halt to it. Spoil- 
sports! 

Suburbanite: A Michigan Avenue tv 
exec recently moved from the city of 
Chicago to a new home in Evanston, 
gives this definition of a suburbanite: 
"A gardener with sex privileges." 

No fix: At the recent annual jam- 
boree of the Washington D. C. Ad- 
vertising Club, WTTG-TV donated a 
bottle of Chanel #5 as a door prize. 
It was won by Symon B. Cowles, 
promotion director of WTTG (who 
turned it over to Channel swimmer 
Florence Chad wick). 

Saved? Phil Stone, CHUM, Toronto, 
reports the following as evidence of 
Hollywood getting religion: Passed 
out on the streets were cards that 
read, "Where will you be when the 
final rushes are shown in Heaven? 
Don't be left on the cutting room 
floor." 

Public Service: From a WBBM, 
Chicago, release — 
"Listeners will be instructed in sensi- 
ble ways to avoid many common 
summer irritants. They will be told 
how to meet many emergencies." 
Like the wolf from the cabin next 
door? 

Scoop: 12-year-old Donald Senott 
has called in many newstips to 
WWDC, Washington, D. C, and re- 
ceived his dollar for each used on the 
air. He has even asked his young 
friends to assist him in news- 
gathering. The other day, a friend 
called Donald with a tip but he was 
out. His mother insisted he call the 
radio station himself. What WWDC 
finally got was this item: that a 
neighbor married 13 years who had 
been told by doctors she wouldn't 
have a baby was now pregnant. 



SPONSOR 



4 JULY 1959 



MONTANA 







IG AGGIE HEADS THE CLASS AT YALE 



She's also a BWOC at Amherst and West Point (Nebraska). 
1 hese are just three of thousands of cities and towns in 
Big Aggie Land, one of the largest land area radio covei 
ages in the U. S. WNAX-570 covers 17"> counties in six 



states 



delivers a 66.4% share of the <>0!>..V.)0 radio homes 



in Big Aggie Land. Profitable promotion in this prosperous 
market — 2i/ t million people with $3 billion to spend — 
begins with WNAX-570. See your Katz man. 




WNAX-570 CBS RADIO 



PROGRAMMING FOR ADULTS OF ALL AGES 

PEOPLES BROADCASTING CORPORATION 



Yankton, South Dakota 



Sioux City, Iowa 




PEOPLES 

II01DOSTIKG C0RF0MII0N 



VVNAX, Yankton. S. D. 

\\(. \H. Cleveland, 0. 

I \\ KID. Worthinqton. 0. 

Sf-..^- WTT.M. Trenton. N. J. 

T / KVTV, Sbux City. Iowa 



What's missing in this picturl 




m 





• CLEVELAND QsEAWAY YEAR 



CLEVlLAN 
WORLD? 
PORt^ 





WDOK 



No picture of "The Best Location in the Nation" is complete with- 
out the sound of WDOK's better music for Northern Ohio. Since we cannot photograph a sound, 
let's just say you must hear it to believe it and then you'll like it, too* 

WDOK has a quality audience, largely adults. Adults who are able 
to buy and persuade others to buy. In fact, there is nothing else like it in Northern Ohio. WDOK 
was first in complete album programming; first with classical programs; first with music unlimited 
(separate FM operation); first with regularly scheduled stereophonic broadcasts; first with the Hi- 
Fi Fair. 

^Cleveland is a bustling metropolis with one of the largest spendable incomes per capita in the United 
States. The latest Nielsen report shows WDOK as No. 2 and No. 1 in the Cleveland market. 

THE CIVIC BROADCASTERS, INC., 1515 EUCLID AVENUE, CLEVELAND 15, OHIO 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY BROADCAST TIME SALES 



J 



11 JULY 1959 
40< a copy* $8 a year 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 








M HE HEART OF THE THRONG AT THE AFA CONVENTION . . . 

HERE WAS THE WTCN MESSAGE CENTER 

I est teletype and photofax news . . . messages from home and other delegates 
business calls . . . free telephones ... all this and Miss Minnesota's assistance, 

t' ! As usual, WTCN was working for the advertiser. 
t was a well-organized "special service"" — the same kind of extra effort that 

Unsa WTCN radio or television spot schedule into a vital force for greater sales. 
Vsk your Katz man about the extra effort sou can expect from WTCN. 



DOES RADIO 
NEED MORE 
RESEARCH? 

No! say broadcasters. 
Plenty of facts already 
available if you know 
where to look for them 

Page 29 



Spot tv: 
answer to a 
salesman's prayer 

Page 33 

Why today's 
buyers must have 
marketing savvy 

Page 36 

Pre-scoring-- 
newest trend in 
tv commercials 

Page 40 



PAUL 
NNEAPOLIS 



RADIO 
TELEVISION 




f 

"PREMIUM 



■ - 1 




f-asr. -, 
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. . . produced these quality positives 

Instantaneous one-step commercials were made available 
to these advertisers through the miracle of Videotape.* 

There are many positive aspects to tape. With tape you 
have the advance security of knowing your commercial is 
right, while changes can still be made, knowing it will 
have better quality, knowing you can produce commer- 
cials in less time and at far less cost to you. 

At our Videotape Center you'll find an unusual personal 
interest in helping you adapt the advantages of tape to 
your commercial needs. If you want your next commer- 
cials to have an extra positive charge, call us at . . . 






VIDEOTAPE PRODUCTIONS OF NEW YORK, INC. 

205 West 58th Street, New York 19,N.Y. JUdson 2-3300 





Mark this market 
on your list! 

CENTRAL and 
SOUTH ALABAMA 

... one of 
Alabama's 
"BIG THREE' 



[WSFA-TV 

MONTGOMERY 



WHY 

WSFA-TV 

IS DOMINANT 

IN CENTRAL 

AND SOUTH 

ALABAMA! 

WSFA-TV has the TOP SHOWS in 
an area of over one million population. 
The April '59 area ARB survey proves 
the dominance of WSFA-TV with this 
population . . . 

Top 10 Shows 

WSFA-TV 9 90% 

Station "C" I 10% 

Top I 5 Shows 

WSFA-TV 13 86% 

Station "C" 2 14% 

WSFA-TV placed five syndicated shows 
in the Top 30 while Station "C" placed 
none in the Top 50. A further indica- 
tion of WSFA-TV 's acceptance. 

OVER A MILLION VIEWERS IN 
35 ALABAMA COUNTIES* 

Population 1,106,000 

Effective Buying Income.... $1,201,510,000 

Retail Sales 799,440,000 

Food Store Sales 217,402,000 

Drug Store Sales 23,964,000 

Automotive Sales 157,280,000 

Gasoline Service Station Sales 74,867,000 

Mark Central and South Alabama on 
your list ... buy it with WSFA-TV! 

* Market area defined by Television Magazine, plus 6 

counties consistently proving regular reception. Does 

not include 3 Georgia and 3 Florida bonus counties. 

(Data from Sales Management Survey at Buying Power) 

WSFA-TV 

MONTGOMERY 

Channel 12 NBC/ABC 

THE WHY TELEVISION SYSTEM, INC. • WKY-TV ANO WKY OKUHOMA CITY 
WTVT TAMPA-ST. PETE«SeU«G 

Represented by the Kate Agency 



[] 



© Vol. 13, No. 28 • 11 JULY 1959 

SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Radio research — are admen wrong about it? 

29 Some admen claim radio needs more research. Yet here is most thoroughly 
researched medium of all with tons of facts if you know where to look 

Spot tv for the era of 'vanishing salesmen' 

33 New study by Katz agency cites decline of in-person selling and urges 
sales managers to place 10% of budgets in spot tv as straight sales tool 

SPONSOR'S new Air Media Basics' 

35 232-page fact book — over 200 charts and tables of important air media 
data to he delivered with 25 July issue. Also new "5-City Ad Directory" 

Marketing's a 'must' for savvy timebuyers 

36 Compton's Frank Kemp and Grey's Hal Davis say today's modern, service- 
in-depth agency needs buyers who know client problems, total ad strategy 

Spot tv glamorizes good old salt 

38 A Western salt company designed smaller, higher-profit package for 
use on dinner table, and promoted style and utility in tv introduction 

Should you pre-score your tv commercials? 

40 New music-first technique is a major trend in spot tv commercials. 
Here, agency people discuss its many uses and some of its pitfalls 

$100,000 re-run for 1936 jingle 

42 Chateau Martin Wines re-entered radio with a brand new way of 
using 23-year-old jingle to solve dealer, copy, marketing problems 

Candy United Nations likes U.S. tv 

43 Surprising data on candy advertising here and abroad come to light when 
11 overseas candy-makers meet at Mogul, Lewin Williams & Saylor, Inc. 



FEATURES 

54 Film-Scope 

26 49th and Madison 

58 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 
58 Picture Wrap-Up 
50 Sponsor Asks 
12 Sponsor Backstage 
56 Sponsor Hears 



1 7 Sponsor-Scope 

80 Sponsor-Speaks 

44 Spot Buys 

80 Ten-Second Spots 

22 Timebuyers at Work 

78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

53 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications I if *J' M 

Audit of Circulations Inc. L.&JS3 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class ptstage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



St 



N AMERICA'S 
ICHEST FARM MARKET 



• 34°c more TV homes per average 
quarter hour than 2nd station 



• first in 3 of America's 4 
richest farm counties 



• area's highest tower 



• only VHF with basic CBS-TV 
affiliation between San Francisco 
and Los Angeles 



REMEMBER 



there's no business like Fresno 
business. Join the happy 
advertisers on KFRE-TV today! 



Sources: Sales Management. 1959 
Nielsen.NSI, March 1959 




Operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 
WFIL-AM • FM • TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV, Binghamton, N. Y. / WLYH-TV, Lebanon-Lancaster, Pa. 
WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona-Johnstown, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, Hartford-New Haven, Conn. / KFRE-AM • TV • KRFM, Fresno, Cal. 
T r i a n qle National Sales Office. 4.RR Lexinatnn Avenue, New York 17, New York 



[37 di^pmt I 




. 




Here are jive important reasons why: 

campaign strategy— Today the 

campaign is all. No individual show 
can do the complete job. The advertiser's 
ultimate goal is the total audience, 
all prospects — not just isolated groups. 
And this year NBC Radio continues 
to deliver more of the top campaign 
audiences than any other network. 

pure economics— With NBC Radio 
you can make more advertising 
impressions for less cost. Further, 
NBC Radio can add more to an existing 
campaign than can any other medium. 
For example, an advertiser with a 
90 -minute TV Special can increase his 
reach by 28% for an 8% additional 
investment on NBC Radio . 

program dispersion— NBC Radio 
gives advertisers more opportunities 
to reach more diversified audiences with : 
44 hours of network programming 
per week; 14 hours of weekend Monitor; 
10 hours of weeknight Monitor; 
10 hours of morning dramatic programs 
weekly; 10 hours of afternoon variety 
programs weekly; Hot -Line Service; 
Monday -through -Friday News on 
the Hour; and Stardust — supplying top 
star identification 85 times weekly. 

flexibility— Announcements are 
available in ninety, sixty, thirty and six 
second lengths. They can be ordered 
in the afternoon and on the air the same 
evening. Weekly plans begin for as little 
as $300 and range to $30,000. Advertisers 
may purchase entire programs, star 
vignettes, or a pure frequency schedule. 

extra services —NBC Radio has 
pioneered the development of new links 
with both the consumer and the dealer. 
Among the most significant: NBC Radio's 
National -Local Plan with the adver- 
tiser's network commercial tailored for 
local dealer cut-in; editorial support 
such as the current "Summertime Is Out- 
door Eating Time"; closed circuit 
dealer meetings; and a long list of 
inventive plans that add both 
reach and return for the advertiser. 

These are the reasons so many adver- 
tisers are attracted to NBC Radio and why 
52.1% of all reported sponsored hours 
in network radio are on the leadership 
network, the . . . 

NBC RADIO 
NETWORK 



ANOTHER FIRST FROM WPDQ! 



World's 
1st Broadcast 

from an 



ISLAND 




Lying under Jacksonville's largest 
bridge, easily seen from either 
bank of the busy St. John's River, 
is a small, uninhabited island. 

On July 1st, WPDQ began six full 
days of broadcasting operations 
from this "Holiday Island"' while 
thousands of Jaxons saw, listened, 
and joined in the proceedings. 
"Holiday Island" became the 24- 
hour a day home of all the WPDQ 
favorites in Swiss Family Robin- 
son style. 

Jaxons joined in the festivities 
which included fireworks, a trib- 
ute to Alaska, fishing and golfing 
contests, and among other startling 
events, a full-scale U. S. Marine 
Landing with all the noise and 
trimmings. Once again, WPDQ 
captured the imagination of all 
Jaxons for undertaking the impos- 
sible to prove WPDQ is "where 
it's fun to listen!" 

Represented by 

Venard, Rintoul, and McConnell 

James S. Ayers, Southeast 



5000 Watts 



600 KC 



WPDQ 

Where alert listeners tune by 
choice . . . not by chance 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



Norman, Craig & Knmmel has romped back into the air ! 
media sweepstakes with an additional $2 million in spot 
television as a direct result of its recent takeover of the 
$4.5 million Hertz Rent-A-Car account from Campbell-Ewald* 



The newsmaker: Norman B. Norman, president of Nor- 
man, Craig & Kummel, promised Hertz executive "a tremendous 
effort in localization" as one of the key points in a pitch that bagged 
the $4,500,000 Rent-A-Car account for this agency. Norman won 
out over five other contenders — Benton & Bowles, Cunningham \ 
Walsh, Clinton E. Frank, North Advertising and the incumbent 
Campbell-Ewald, which has had the account for 32 years. 

Norman indicated to sponsor that spot tv would continue to 
command the lion's share of the Hertz budget. Hertz's spot tv ex- 
penditure took a spectacular jump in '59 over '58. (By SPONSOR 
estimates, first quarter of '59 came to $436,540 in spot tv, against 
$20,710 for the entire year of 1958.) Hertz spent around $1 million 
with CBS Radio for a total of 22 of 5-minute evening newscasts per 
week from 24 March through 20 December. Norman considers 
"visual impact" vital to any Hertz schedule for Rent-A-Car. 

This strategy will be tied to major problems of the car renting busi- 
ness which Norman has familiarized himself with via an 18,000-mile 
junket, calling on Hertz branch offices, as Norman put it, "before we 
ever went to see the Hertz people." 

These are the competitive and marketing problems which affect the 
Hertz Rent-A-Car business, as envisioned by Norman: 

• Expanding usage — as outlined above, possibly resulting in the 
dual budget approach. 

• Rent it here, drive it there — involving the complicated market- 1 
ing problem of getting the car back again. Local campaigns of equal i 
strength tied to local business or vacation needs must be running on , 
both ends of every group. "Combination of regional zone advertising 
are absolutely essential," said Norman. 

• Renting as contrasted with buying — a concept in direct compe- 
tition with such hard-hitting copy appeals as "second car," "business 
car," "new car for that family vacation." 

• Overseas usage — an expanding phase of the business requiring 
awareness in advance of a business or vacation trip. (Currently, 
Hertz has 313 offices in 39 foreign countries, in addition to its 1,700 
branches in over 1,100 U.S. cities.) 

The Hertz business substantially increases NC&K's air billing. 
(Its only other major air media user is Hudson Paper, which spent 
$65,640 in spot tv last year.) Willys Motors, Inc. has been the 
agency's only hard goods account. For some time, NC&K has oper- 
ated with a relatively small list of accounts, mainly packaged goods. 

To handle the Hertz account, NC&K's Chicago staff will be doubled 
to 15 employees. Creative work will be handled in New York with 
exec v.p. Eugene H. Kummel heading the account group. ^ 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



ARE YOU BUYING 




HE NUMBER ONE AUDIENCE? 




eeg 



YOU ARE BUYING BLUE SKY if you are buying 
WJAC-TV. Latest and most complete area survey ever 
made explodes WJAC-TV's blue sky claim of more 
than 1 million TV homes; proves WJAC-TV delivers 
less than 300,000 TV homes, compared with WFBG- 
TV's 290,600*. 



YOU ARE BUYING THE NUMBER ONE AUDIENCE 
if you are buying WFBG-TV, Altoona-Johnstown, Pa. 
WFBG-TV delivers 71% greater audience than WJAC- 
TV and at lower cost per 1000. Latest ARB proves 
that WFBG-TV delivers the area's NUMBER ONE 
AUDIENCE--. 



Talk to the research department of your 
advertising agency. They have sifted out 
the facts from the blue sky claims. 




SOURCES: 'ARB, 10-County Telephone Coincidental 
Survey, April 27-May 3, 1959. 
Television Magazine Data Book, 1959. 
Television Magazine, May 1959. 
A. C Nielsen, Spring 1959. 
°-ARB. Altoona. April 11-May 8, 1959. 



WFBG-TV 



ALTOONA-JOHNSTOWN, PA. 

Channel 10 

ABC-TV« CBS-TV 

Repretenled by BLAIR -TV 
Operated by: Radio and Television Div. / Triangle Publications, Inc. / 46th & Market Sts., Philadelphia 39, Pa. 

WFIL-AM • FM • TV, Philadelphia, Pa. / WNBF-AM • FM • TV, Binghamton, N. Y. / WLYH-TV, Lebanon-Lancaster, Pa. 

WFBG-AM • TV, Altoona-Johnstown, Pa. / WNHC-AM • FM • TV, Hartford-New Haven, Conn. / KFRE-AM • TV • KRFM, Fresno, Cal. 

Triangle National Sales Office, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, New York 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 




anrone For smsms ? 



Let's face it — we're in a business where statistics flow like 
. . . er, water. 

Since this is the case, here are a few for your consideration: 

In the morning, WBT's audience lead over its nearest com- 
petitor is 92%.* 

In the afternoon, WBT's audience lead over its nearest com- 
petitor is 69%.* 

At night, WBT's audience lead over its nearest competitor 
is 123%** 

Three mighty good reasons for placing your next schedule 
on WBT — the station that creates the nation's 24th largest 
radio market. Call CBS Radio Spot Sales for availabilities. 

*Pu|se 25 county area March 1959 



WBT CHaPlPTTe 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 
JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



SPONSOR 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 

Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffa 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 

Contributing Editor 

Joe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Administrative Mgr. 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 

George Becker; Priscilla Hoffman 












SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 





of the total 

automotive gross sales 

are made in the 

KEYSTONE COVERAGE AREA! 



• Eighteen and one half BILLIONS of DOLLARS in 
automobiles and accessories are purchased in areas cov- 
ered by Keystone stations. 

We'll be happy to send you our just completed 
KEYSTONE AUTOMOTIVE STUDY and our latest 
STATION LIST. Write to our nearest office: 



CHICAGO NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 

111 W.Washington St. 527 Madison Ave. 3142 Wilshire Blvd. 57 Post St. 

STate 2-8900 ELdorado 5-3720 DUnkirk 3-2910 SUtter 1-7440 

Detroit Penobscot Building 



• TAKE YOUR CHOICE. A handful of stations or the network ... a minute ot a full hour-it's 
up to you, your needs. 

• MORE FOR YOUR DOLLAR. No premium cost for individualized programming. Network 
coverage for less than some "spot" costs. 

• ONE ORDER DOES THE JOB. All bookkeeping and details are done by Keystone, yet the best 
time and place are chosen for you. 




SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 



ANNOUNCING THE NEW 

VIDEOTAPE* TELEVISION RECORDER 




MPEX VR-1000B 



This new model of the widely accepted Ampex 
Videotape* Television Recorder is now being deliv- 
ered to networks and stations everywhere. With 
many new features and a number of refinements, it 
brings even greater efficiency and convenience to sta- 



tion operation. For all of its new features, however, 
the "B" retains full compatibility with the over 360 
Ampex VR-1000's already in operation, and so be- 
comes a new and important part of the world-wide 
system of Ampex Videotape Television Recorders. 



AND A MESSAGE OF IMPORTANCE TO THE TV INDUSTRY 




MR CHARLES GINSBURG 



MR NEAL K MCNAUGHTEN 



We at Ampex are asked many questions by station man- 
agement about both tape recording and our equipment 
— questions directly related to the success of a television 
recorder installation. Of these, eight have stood out as 
particularly important, and they are answered here for 
you by Neal McNaughten, Manager of the Professional 
Products Division, and Charles Ginsburg, inventor of 
the Videotape Television Recorder . . . 

HOW WIDESPREAD ARE AMPEX VR-1000 INSTALLATIONS? 

"The first prototypes of the VR-1000 were delivered to the three 
networks, ABC, CBS and NBC in the spring of 1956. Since that 
time more than 360 production models have gone into service 
throughout the world - with over 250 of these in the U. S." 

WHY ARE YOU INTRODUCING A NEW "B" MODEL? 

"During the year-and-a-half that we have been producing the 
VR-1000 on a production line basis, a number of developments 
have occurred and new features have been introduced. Most of 
these have been offered in the form of kits from time to time 
to VR-1000 owners. Finally there were enough of these innova- 
tions to justify the introduction of the 'B' model." 

WHAT ARE THE FEATURES OF THE NEW VR-1000B? 

"Very briefly- guaranteed signal-to-noise ratio of 36 db for 
even finer picture quality. RF/RF inter-connection for finest 
quality tape duplicates. Faster tape start (2 sec.) for quick 
cueing. Automatic brake release for easier tape handling. Ad- 
justable tape playback speed control for lip synchronizing two 
or more recorders. Simplified set-up procedures. Improved ac- 
cessibility. Complete, accurate monitoring. And operation aids 
that include full width erase, cue channel with tone generator 
and tape timer. Even stereo sound tracks may be added." 

DO I HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT OBSOLESCENCE? 

"No - not if you buy an Ampex! While there have been refine- 
ments in the equipment there has been no change in the basic 
operation of the Ampex Recorder itself- nor is any anticipat- 
ed in the future. The present Ampex recording system has 
been accepted as the standard throughout the industry- by 
independent stations, networks, and production companies 
alike. We expect to see all VR-1000's and VR-lOOOB's in opera- 
tion for many years to come." 

IS THE VR-1000B COMPATIBLE 

AND INTERCHANGEABLE WITH THE VR-1000? 

"Yes -the 'B' is fully compatible with the VR-1000's now in 
operation. Tapes will be completely interchangeable. 
"Interchangeability of television tapes, as with audio tapes, is 



achieved when all recorder units are set up to the same 
standard. Since some of the factors in the 'standard' are 
chosen arbitrarily, the practical day-to-day reference is a 
standard alignment tape. With adherence to this standard, full 
interchangeability is assured between Ampex recorders. 
"This is evidenced daily in commercial operation. Right now, 
10 different companies are syndicating over 20 taped programs 
on a national basis — and we have a report that one, 'Divorce 
Court,' is now in 23 markets 'on tape'." 

CAN THE VR-1000B BE EQUIPPED TO RECORD COLOR? 

"Yes. Both the VR-1000B and the VR-1000 television recorders 
are engineered to record color by the addition of a single rack 
of electronics to the basic unit. The VR-1000B can be ordered 
from the factory ready to record color — or the color addition 
can be made at any time after installation. Right now (June 
1959) NBC is operating 16 VR-1000's with full Ampex color - 
12 factory equipped and 4 with Ampex color added after instal- 
lation. And CBS is operating 4 VR-1000's to which Ampex color 
has been added." 

SHOULD I WAIT FOR FURTHER IMPROVEMENTS? 

"No — no more than one should wait for possible refinements 
in next year's camera chain or transmitter. Certainly future 
refinements will come — but the important thing is that Ampex 
television recording is now a completely proved and accepted 
television technique. 

"Evidence of this is the number of Ampex recorders in regular 
use throughout the country. 90 within the networks; NBC, CBS 
and ABC — each with approximately 30 recorders. Over 100 in 
independent stations. And over 20 in production companies. 
These users, representing every phase of the industry, DICTATE 
that there will be no change to basic Ampex techniques. 
"And, most important — these recorders are making money — 
which after all is the real determining factor of when to buy. 
In present installations many Recorders have already paid for 
themselves — and almost all stations are experiencing greater 
income and higher profits. 

"To wait- is to pass up the money-making opportunities that 
exist today." 

IF YOU HAVE ANY OTHER QUESTIONS - 
... we would like the opportunity to answer them — and 
to describe more fully the significance and features of 
the VR-1000B. Our representative will be glad to do this 
with you personally — may he call you for an appoint- 
ment? Or if you prefer, write to Dept. 304 for our two 
new publications — one describing the 'B' and all its fea- 
tures, the other a report on how stations are making and 
saving money with their Ampex VR-1000's. 



VIDEOTAPE 




professional 
products division 



934 CHARTER STREET / REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 
Offices and representatives in principal cities throughout the world 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 



11 



YO 



! ; 



can 
reac 





of Mississippi 
Retail Sales . . . 

$918,000,000 

IN THE SOUTH'S 

FASTEST GROWING 

TV MARKET 



* 



Jackson, Miss.' 



with these Jackson 
stations 

WelTV 12 



KATZ 



WlbT 

HOLLINGBERY 
* Nation's business gains leader 

12 



by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 




A Swede and the Russ upset pay-tv cart 

A Swedish man who is very fond of dancing, 
name of Ingemar Johansson, and a big dance act 
from Russia seemed destined to shape some part 
of the future of pay television in this country, 
according to developments this past week. 

Ingemar has upset, at least temporarily, what 
seemed to be very neatly put together plans of 
Irving Kahn, astute president of Teleprompter, 
Inc., to become the No. 1 sports theater television entrepreneur in 
the nation. Inge did this, as has been well-publicised, by upsetting 
young Floyd Patterson in the third round of their bout, and reliev- 
ing him of the heavyweight championship of the world. 

Kahn, of course, had a very tight working arrangement with Cus 
D'Amato, Patterson's manager and operating head of Floyd Patter- 
son Enterprises, for the radio, television and motion picture rights 
of this last Patterson bout, and presumably at least options on future 
Patterson struggles. There is no evidence to date that Kahn has 
similar arrangements with the new Swedish champion, or with Bill 
Rosensohn, the promoter who has the rematch rights for the next 
Johansson-Patterson bout. Kahn also had arrangements with many 
fight managers and promoters in various sections of the country 
relating to broadcast and motion picture rights to their bouts. The 
big one, as always, is the heavyweight title go, and a television im- 
presario has little if he holds the rights to all the fights in the world 
except the one for the title tilts among the big boys. 

Sport9 theater telecasts 

None of this is to say that Kahn and Teleprompter may not yet 
come up with the next Johansson-Patterson brannigan, or with a 
headlock on tele and film rights involving the dimpled Scandinavian. 
And none of this is intended to suggest a benefit be held for Mr. 
Kahn, in any event. 

Teleprompter did fairly well with the fight in theater television, 
motion picture theaters and on radio. And once again, this fight 
demonstrated the vast potential of theater telecasting. Here was a 
battle in which the sports writers, almost to a man, progressively 
pooh-poohed Johansson as a humpty-dumpty, handpicked by Cus 
D'Amato to be pushed over by his champion. They felt this way in 
spite of Johansson's one-round knockout of the top heavyweight 
challenger Eddie Machen last year. They panned the Swede's train- 
ing methods. They pushed the book odds all the way up to S 1 /^ to 1 
against him. 

There were efforts on Machen's part to halt the fight by litigation. 
It rained on Thursday, the original date set for the fight, and rained 
again until about an hour before fight time on Friday. Notwith- 
standing all this, the fight drew close to a million dollars in the 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 



theaters, arenas, armories and auditoriums which carried it around 
the country. Hot fight towns like Seattle. Portland, Houston, Dallas. 
Minneapolis, Miami, New Haven and Pittsburgh sold out in almost 
every situation with ticket prices averaging out at around $4 each. 
Even in lukewarm fight areas, where some of the large capacity 
houses were only 20% filled, the promoters and all concerned made 
a good deal of money. In New Haven, for example. Loew's Poli's 
3.000 seats were sold. In the Jefferson Armory in Louisville, only 
3,000 of the 6,500 seats were filled, but it was a highly profitable date 
for the promoter. In Seattle, fight manager-promoter Jack Hurley 
made himself a bundle by doing close to $18,000 with the battle. 
Hurley also had the fight for Spokane, Portland and Tacoma. and did 
well in each situation. 

Even after Patterson and D'Amato get their 43% and Johansson 
his 20%, Teleprompter's 45% came to a nice take. And the motion 
picture income from the films of the fight are estimated at between 
$500,000 and a million dollars, depending on who's doing the esti- 
mating. Couple of interesting sidelights on the whole broadcasting- 
film phase of the fight: The ABC network radiocast, of course, was 
sponsored by United Artists for its release of the John Wayne-Bill 
Holden "Horse Soldiers." This is showing at the Astor in New York. 
\nd Saturday night, the night after the fight, the Astor didn't have 
the fight films. But the theater right next door, the Criterion, show- 
ing "Elephant Gun" did have the fight films. Price in each house was 
$1.85. My son Buster and I went to see the fight films, as I'm sure 
did many others. 

Fight films were in demand in countries all over the world. Word 
was around that South Africa wanted to buy them, but only if Pat- 
terson lost. Teleprompter, it's reported, turned them down. Wonder 
if they'll be able to lay their hands on a couple of prints anyway? 

Once again it comes up Bolshoi 

The big dance act from Russia, which is causing some heavy 
breathing in certain pay-tv circles, is the Bolshoi Ballet. Matty Fox 
made a deal with impresario Sol Hurok for the American television 
rights to the ballet. He spent close to $1,000,000 videotaping about 
four hours of the show. He's been trying, unsuccessfully so far. to 
make a deal with one of the major networks to show the four hours 
of outstanding ballet, but with some kind of tie-in for his Skiatron 
home pay-tv system. 

Now it's been announced that a company called Art Theatre of 
the Air, Inc., here in New York, has bought the American telerights 
to five big Russian dance groups, including the Bolshoi. Art Theatre 
Bays it has the rights to about four hours of color and black-and- 
white film featuring the Bolshoi, Moscow and Georgian ballets, and 
lli Vloiseyev Dancers and Red Army Ensemble. These films, accord- 
ing to Art Theatre, were made in Russia in 1956, 1957 and 1958. 
So far. Art Theatre s president, Joe Harris, hasn't made any an- 
nouncements on whether he would try to place the films with a net- 
work, or to syndicate them. 

At the moment, Harris is planning to have a top choreographer 
dub in a special commentary to go with the films. It's anybody's 
guess what effect this will have on Matty Fox's Bolshoi videotapes. 

It is safe to say that both the Bolshoi situation, and the Johansson- 
Patterson situation further dramatize two inevitable and continuing 
television developments : 

(1) It gets to be a smaller world every dav, and 

'2i In one form or another pay television must grow. ^^ 






SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



If you haven't tied up 
the biggest TV coverage 



in Oklahoma's richest 
market , your Advertising 
Campaign has a loose end! 

Tie up that loose end 
with KOCO-TV's perfect 
advertising package . . . 
the greatest coverage 



in Oklahoma at the 
lowest cost per thousand! 



KOCO-TV 



CHANNEL! 



OKLAHOMA CITY 

Charlie Keys, General Manager 



BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATES 



13 




Our awards are 



/. 



Q 




14 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



your rewards! 



Constant quality programming pays 
off in audience growth and loyalty! 



Peabody Award 

Won by WGN-TV's Blue Fairy as the best children's program of the year. 

Alfred P. Sloan Award 

Presented to WGN Radio "Signal 10" for public service in promoting traffic 
safety. "Signal 10" documents the work of the state police of Indiana with 
on-the-spot recordings of actual traffic violations and instructive comments on 
their dangers. This popular, 25-minute feature has been made available to 17 
other midwestern radio stations. 

Ohio State 1958 TV Award 

Presented by Ohio State University to WGN-TV for its documentary program 
"The Cardinal's Two Hats," based on the life of the late Samuel Cardinal Stritch. 

3 Emmy Awards and 10 Plaques 

WGN-TV's Fran Allison was awarded two Emmys. She was chosen best actress of 
the year and best saleswoman of the year. 

WGN-TV's cameraman, Wilmer Butler was awarded the behind-the-camera Emmy 
for "best creator with material elements." 

The ten plaques awarded to WGN-TV were shared by these seven WGN-TV 
staffers: Fran Allison, Frazier Thomas, Jack Brickhouse, Sheldon Cooper, Frances 
Horwich, Bob Trendler, and Bob Stebbins. 

Quality programming, presented with integrity, produces award winners. It also 
produces rewards for advertisers who can depend on WGN and WGN-TV to deliver 
loyal audiences day after day, year-in, year-out. 



WGN and WGN-TV 

Serving all Chicagoland 

441 N. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 11, III. 




SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



15 



WE 

DIDNT 
THINK WE'D 

GO SO FAR 
SO FAST 



16 



The final Nielsen for June (reflecting the 24 major 
competitive markets) is in. And of all the many happy 
returns ABC-TV has enjoyed this year, this one is the 
happiest. And by far the most sweeping. 

ABC, for the first time, enjoyed the largest average share 
of the evening audience. 

ABC, not for the first time, was tops in four out of seven 
nights a week-more than the other two networks combined. 

And out of the 42 evening half hours, from 7:30 to 10:30 
NYT, ABC was No. 1 in twenty. The other two 
networks were first in only eleven apiece. 

To tell you the truth, we're a little surprised ourselves. 
This is an ad we didn't figure to run until October. 
But it makes for a grand summer. 

Go right to the TOP — go . . . 

ABC TELEVISION 

Source: Nielsen 24-Market TV Report, week ending June 21, 1959, Average Share of 
Audience, Sun. Sat., 7:30-8:30 PM, all commercial programs. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



' 



Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week ivith interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



II JULY 1959 

C.pyHiM DM 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATION* INC. 



Planners in top-rank agencies are convinced that there's nothing to stop the 
final quarter of 1959 from recording true "boom" levels. 

Among the indices that they see favoring a whopping three months are these: 

1) Consumers think that prices are bound to go up, hence will be inclined to spend 
liberally. 

2) Dealers have been building large inventories of hard goods and they'll soon be 
under pressure to get these stocks moving via promotions. 

3) The time is ideal for the marketing of new products. 

4) Never before have big business organizations been so urgently inclined to spend 
for institutional, or image, building. 



For more than one of the agency giants the immediate future poses an ironic 
paradox: Though their forecasts point to burgeoning billings, they're hesitant about 
budgeting for additional staff and operating expenses. 

They haven't recovered yet from the psychological trauma of last year's recession. 
Result: Vacations have become shortened or somewhat dubious and workloads are get- 
ting heavier. 

Just to cite a few of the new products that will keep the tv pot boiling this fall : 

Westinghouse and General Electric will have several initiates in both the big and 
small appliance field of a revolutionary nature. 

Kellogg's new high protein cereal (Burnett), Concentrate, will go national after 
a trial run on the West Coast. 

Toni (North) will have a new hair rinse, Colorcade, now being quietly tested. 

The Pam Co. (Arthur Meyerhoff), maker of the dry fry, will be introducing a pres- 
sure-dispensed sugarless sweetener; test markets are now being appraised. 



Tv stations worried about the drift toward longer announcement units (as 
against I.D.s) can take heart from this: The Tea Council (Burnett) has decided to use 
nothing but J.D.s in its next campaign — 15 October through mid-March. 

The theory behind the strategy: The initial educational job of the Council has been 
done, and all that's needed for the immediate future is to keep the tea idea alive. 



As SPONSOR-SCOPE estimates it, advertiser expenditures for tv network pro- 
graming the coming season should hit a record mark of around $350 million. 

The outlay by categories: regularly scheduled nighttime programing, $250 million; 
daytime programing, $50 million; specials, $40 million; sports, $10 million. 

Here's what the weekly program spending for regularly-scheduled nighttime shows 
looks like: 

NETWORK NO. PROGRAMS WEEKLY EXPENDITURES 

ABC TV 34 $1,675,000 

CBS TV 44 1,965,000 

NBC TV 34 1,925.000 

TOTAL 112 $5,565,000 



PONSOR 



11 july 1959 



17 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Sellers of spot tv are battling it out with NBC TV for a Sl-million budget that 
Studebaker has set aside for fall tv. 

NBC's bid: a fourth of the NCCA's 10 football games. 






Revlon, from present indications, will be spending $100,000 a week on spot 

tv from September to March as a supplement to its 20 hour and 90-minute programs on 
CBS TV. 

The bulk of this spot money would go into 10 markets whose station coverage 
represents about 60% of cosmetic retail sales. 



Revere Camera (KM&J) is setting itself for the pre-Christmas push via a sched- 
ule of prime time tv minutes from 28 September through 13 December. 

A new tape recorder will be featured along with Revere's line of still and movie 
cameras. 

Quaker Oats' Flako (Clinton Frank), one of spot radio's big users last year, 
may wind up in the tv camp this fall. 

The only reason would be this: 

Flako's package has been redesigned, and the company feels a need for visual im- 
pact to promote the change. 



Another huge piece of business headed spot tv's way this fall will come from 
the Norelco shaver people. 

The buy via LaRoche: 80 markets with an average of 10 early and late evening 
minutes per week. There'll also be a few network shots before Christmas. Overall cost 
for time will run around $1 million. 

WLAC-TV, Nashville, is certainly among the first — if not the first — to promote to 
its farm audience the idea that farmers should tote around a tv portable the way 

they carry radio sets. 

The station is running about 30 spots a week urging farmers to "live where you 
are" via the tv portable route. 









ABC TV is carrying its strong identity with westerns into the area of daytime 
block programing. 

It will have a Monday-through-Friday strip of Restless Gun reruns. 

Incidentally, syndicators also are trying to sell as daytime strips such off-network 
westerns as The Calif ornians and Trackdown. 






The theory could turn out a far-fetched one, but there's a school of timebuyers cur- 
rently advancing the prediction that the second and third station will be loaded 
with more national spot this fall than the number one station. 

The basis for this bit of prophecy: 

The presently-loaded station can accept business only within 30 days of start- 
ing date (because it doesn't know what the renewals will be at that time). Many buyers, 
however, aren't going to wait. So it looks like the generally tight situation which pre- 
vailed in 1957 will repeat itself this fall. 

Here's what already has happened in some agencies: 

Clients have been urged to approve whatever time is obtainable for a Septem- 
ber starting date and take a chance of improvements later in the campaign — regardlesi 
of the station's comparative status in the market. 

18 SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continue 



Spot (or ABC TV) will be the gainers from the fact that seasonal buyers in night- 
time network tv won't be able, as in past years, to get into either the Steve Allen 
or Perry Como shows. Both are sold exclusively to a single sponsor. 

What makes ABC an open sesame for these short-run customers is that the network is 
loaded with programs that can accommodate catch-as-catch-can buys. 

Seven-Up (Chicago JWT) has again hitched its tv wagon to ABC TV — this time 
as a customer of minute participations on nighttime programs. 

For a start, the beverage will use 37 minutes between November and December in 
American Bandstand, The Alaskans, and Adventures in Paradise. 

Included is an option giving 7-Up the privilege of switching its bulk of minutes 
after the first of the year to whichever is the bigger dick — Alaskans or Paradise. 

Pillsbury (Burnett) isn't letting General Mills corner the specials hoopla in the 

flour mix field. 

Against General Mills' Hollywood feature remakes, Pillsbury will match its partici- 
pation in six Shirley Temple Story Books (NBC TV) next season. 

Incidentally, Chrysler will have Fred Astaire on again 4 November. 

Another NBC note: There's a good chance of Longine (Victor Bennett) sponsor- 
ing a Chronoscope series Sunday afternoons (5:30-6) when Chet Huntley isn't occupying 
the spot for Kemper Insurance. The Kemper commitment is for 13 broadcasts over 26 weeks. 

Watch for two of the tv networks to focus some of their sales promotion on 
the advantages of buying them as announcement carriers instead of spot. 

All this will be done quite delicately, so as not to arouse the ire of affiliates. 

One batch of figures that agencies will be seeing shortly will compare what an advertiser 
can get for the same budget in audience and coverage from a network announcement 
at night vs. prime time local station announcements. 

You can anticipate this retort to the networks from stations: 

The trend toward more one-hour shows has eliminated many chainbreaks and 
given us less spots to sell. We know your spot carriers can offer prices that station spot 
can't beat in terms of accumulative homes. But why rub it in with special promotion? 

Westerns continue to have the choicest cost-per-thousand-per-commercial- min- 
ute — even though, generally speaking, CPMPCMs by program types are at a slightly higher 
level than they were last year. 

Here are the latest average costs, with the number of programs noted in parenthe- 
ses, and their counterparts for the like 1958 period (both based on NTI) : 

PROGRAM TYPE MARCH-APRIL 1959 AVG. MARCH-APRIL 1958 AVG. 

Hour western $2.15 (5) 

M> hr. western 2.91 (15) 

Quiz 3.25 (9) 

Situation comedy 3.43 (16) 

Variety 3.62 (12) 

Adventure 3.78 (8) 

General drama (i/2 hr.) 3.85 (8) 

Crime-mystery 3.97 (8) 

Avg. for all types $3.54 

Note: The fact that westerns as a class still lead the pack in cost-per by a goodly mar- 
gin would, it seems, belie the theory advanced by some researelicrs that the schedul- 
ing of one western against another has tended to dilute sets in use. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 19 



$2.21 


(4) 


2.57 


(10) 


3.11 


(17) 


3.84 


(12) 


4.76 


(16) 


3.73 


(10) 


3.36 


(6) 


3.68 


(13) 


$3.53 





, 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



1 


hr. 


1 


hr. 


y 2 


hr. 


% 


hr. 



General Mills and DFS appear to be in the middle of that contractual ruckus 
between Walt Disney and ABC TV, involving mainly the Mickey Mouse Club. 

Seems that DFS came up with the idea of spotting MMC for viewing by the young 
set when they came home for lunch. But — and here's where the rub came in — it 
wouldn't be on ABC, because General Mills already is committed for another cartoon strip 
on that network at 5:30-6 p.m. 

Trade commentary: The fact that ABC can argue with Disney marks the end of 
an era, for ABC got its first big initial push from that quarter. 



For the first time in months, average daily hours of viewing as compared to 1958 
took a hike in May. 

This May's Nielsen average: 4 hrs. 31 in ins. Year ago: 4 hrs. 14 mins. 



According to the new ratecard put into effect last week, gross time costs on NBC 
TV have gone up 4r5% within the past year. 

Here's a comparison of station costs for Class A time: 

lineups 1959 1958 

100 stations $109,400 $104,500 

195 stations 129,880 123,160 

100 stations 65,640 62,700 

195 stations 77,928 73,920 

The average evening hookup is 130 stations, which in gross billings represents 
about $118,000 for an hour and $71,000 for a half-hour. 

Note: The discount structure remains unchanged. Roughly, the average net for 
the regular nighttime advertiser would be $100,000 for an hour and $60,000 per half-hour. 

Whenever you've got a sellers market, you're bound to hear murmurs of "anti- 
trust" from the smaller buyers. 

A couple of agency sources told SPONSOR-SCOPE this week that they had clients who 
were complaining of the inequity and competitive handicap they were facing in network 
tv because of the much larger discounts accorded the giants in their field. 

If you have any doubts whether housewives in the higher income groups view 
daytime tv to any appreciable extent, ask NBC TV for a poll it has just completed on 
daytime audiences by income levels. 

It tackled the job as a challenge to an advertiser with a high-priced item who 

wanted to make sure that daytime tv had the prospects he required before renewing his 
contract. 

The poll among 3,000 housewives on what attention daytime tv got from them showed 
these percentages: 

WATCH REGULARLY 
INCOME GROUP OR OCCASIONALLY DON ' T WATCH 

Under $5,000 69.9% 31.1% 

$5,000-7,500 70.4% 29.6% 

$7,500 and over 59.2% 40.8% 
P.S.: NBC got the renewal. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6; 

Spot Buys, page 44; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 58; Washington Week, page 53; sponsor 
Hears, page 56; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 54. 

20 sponsor • 11 july 1959 







WNOE Wins The Battle Of New Orleans 




James A. Noe, Jr., Vice President & General Manager 
Cleve J. Briert, General Sales Manager 
Bud W. Connell, Program Director 
Represented nationally by Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



;0\SOR • 11 JULY 1959 



21 



w 




is the 
most 
effective 
sales force 
in the 


CHICAGO 


';'«& m '] j> 


NEGRO 


1490 kc. 
102.7 mc. 


MARKET 

with 

Chicago's Greatest 

Air Salesman 


f*\ BIG 


represented 

by 

Bernard 

Howard & Co., 

Inc. 


hf 1 BILL 
m?f HILL 



Same ownership as WDIA— Memphis 



CHECK J/and 
DOUBLE CHECK J> 



V 

WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand 
of all Indiana TV 
stations! 

vv 

One hundred and eleven 
national and regional 
spot advertisers know that 
the Terre Haute market is 
not covered effectively 
by outside TV. 

WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL IO • CBS — ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 

Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 




Time buyers 
at work 




Jeff Fine, Doherly. Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, New York, fe 
that a great deal of promotion material is badly prepared, and 
some instances, survey figures are inaccurate. "Often we get in 
mail a brochure from a station announcing that it is 'first in 
latest survey,' " Jeff says. '"But the survey and dates aren't indicat 
For all we know, the survey may 
be three years old. Radio set own- 
ership figures are thrown around 
loosely too, without documenta- 
tion. We don't want slick estima- 
tions, we want facts and sources." 
Jeff also points out that some sta- 
tions have misinterpreted share-of- 
audience figures. Example: a sta- 
tion leads in share-of-audience in 
the market only on Saturday and 

Sundav : il- competitoi leads th< ^^gk ^iHHP ^ 

rest of the week, Monday through 

Friday. But by totaling the figures for the entire week, then dividi 
to get an average figure, it shows itself to have the biggest share 
audience. "These practices accomplish nothing in the long rui 
Jeff says, "and can only cause tremendous loss in station integrit; 



Nathan Pinsof, Edward H. Weiss & Co., Chicago, thinks tl 
crowded network tv conditions this coming season will cause ager 
problems in both network and spot areas. "All three networks 
nearly sold out, and a large number of advertisers who usually b 
network at the last minute in the fall are going to be without avs 

abilities," Nate points out. "Dou 
less, many of these advertisers \ 
commit their budgets to spot tv 
a result, and many of them v 
suffer as stations try to grab off 
much business as possible." N 
thinks that this may create a sit 
tion where many stations will 
tempted to triple-spot at every 
portunity, so that agencies 
have to be more diligent than e 
in the handling of their buys 
in policing their spots. "At 
same time," Nathan says, "agencies with network shows will ; 
plagued with the problem of local triple-spotting cutting into thH 
net commercials, and it will be equally important that they ajf 
monitor the stations very carefully to keep the stations in linl 




22 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 19> 



:hese are 



assets 



HE TAFT STATIONS consider 
ailed, creative, experienced people its 
ost important assets. This investment 
1 people, from top management 
rough every level, pays off hand- 
>mely in high quality programming, 
his policy results in larger, more loyal 
idiences and . . . increased volume of 
les for Advertisers using the facilities 
the Taft Stations. 

you are interested in having your 
Ivertising dollars earn more . . . now 

the time to invest them in growing 
aft Stations. 





io and television stations 



R 

icuhii ....I FM 

les Representatives: The Katz Agency, Inc., *The Young Television Corp. Sales Office: Radio Cincinnati 
NSOR • 11 JULY 1959 23 






WSM 

(Established 1925) 

THE JOHN BLAIR STATION 

Basic NBC Affiliate 



Bates effective March 1, 1959. 
Rates received March 2. 1959. 

Owned and operated by WSM, Inc. 
Personnel 

President— John H. DeWitt. Jr 

General Manager — Bob Cooper. 

Promotion Manager — Mrs. Trudy Stamper. 
Representatives 

John Blair & Company. 
Mailing Instructions 

Business Office and Studio— .National Bldg. . Seventh 
Ave., and Lnion St., Nashville 3, Tenn., telephone 
Alpine 4-5656. 

Transmitter — Located 12 miles in the country. 
Wavs — Power — Time Operating power— 50,000 watts. 

Frequency — 650 kilocycles. 
Non-directional. 

Licensed to operate on clear channel full time 

Operates on Central Standard Time. 

Operating schedule: . 

Agency Commission 

15% to recognized agencies on net charges for station 

time and talent. No commission on line charges. No 

cash discount. Bills due and payable on or before the 

15th of the month following that in which the broad- 
casting is done. 
General Advertising 

For combination rates see NBC Radio Network. 

Advertising of alcoholic beverages not accepted. 

No perlcds sold in bulk for resale. 

Station rates and talent charges subject to change 

without notice. 



CLASS "A" 
(6:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. dally) 

1 hr. 1/2 hr. 1/4 hr. 

1 time 420.00 275.00 180.00 

52 times 409.50 268.13 175.50 

104 times 399.00 261.25 171.00 

156 times 388.50 254.38 166.50 

208 times 367.50 240.63 157.50 

260 times 346.50 226.88 148.50 

312 or more 

times 315.00 206.25 135.00 

CLASS "B" 
(7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. 
11:00 p.m.) 

1 time 210.00 137.50 90.00 

52 times 204.75 134.06 87.75 

104 times 199.50 130.63 85.50 

156 times 194.25 127.19 83.25 

208 times 183.75 120.31 78.75 

260 times 173.25 113.44 71.25 

312 or more times 157.50 103.13 67.50 
CLASS "C" 
(6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m.) 

1 time 157.50 102.75 67.50 

52 times 153.56 100.18 65.81 

104 times 149.62 97.61 64.12 

156 times _ 145.69 95.04 62.44 

208 times 137.81 89.91 59.06 

260 times 129.94 84.77 55.69 

312 or more times 118.12 77.06 50.62 
CLASS "D" 
(11:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m.) 

1 time 105.00' 68.50 45.00 

52 times 102.38 66.79 43.88 

104 times 99.75 65.08 42.75 

156 times 97.13 63.36 41.63 

208 times 91.88 59.94 39.38 

260 times 86.63 56.51 37.13 

312 or more times 78.75 51.38 33.75 



5 min. 
115.00 
112.13 
109.25 
106.38 
100.63 
94.88 

86.25 



to 

57.50 
56.06 
54.63 
53.19 
50.31 
47.44 
43.18 



43.15 
42.08 
41.00 
39.91 
37.78 
35.60 
32.36 



28.75 
28.03 
27.31 
26.59 
25.16 
23.72 
21.56 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
(7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. Monday through Sat- 
urday and after 10:30 p.m. Saturday) 

1 -minute StationbreaKs 

Each Per wk. Each Per uk. 

Less than 6 weekly.. 5 5. 00 30.00 

6 weekly 50.00 300.00 35.00 210.00 

12 weekly 46.00 552.00 32.00 384.00 

18 weekly 43.00 774.00 30.00 540.00 

24 weekly 40.00 960.00 28.00 672.00 

30 weekly 36.00 1,080.00 25.00 750.00 

(9:00 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Monday through 

Thursday: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 

p.m. to 10:30 p. in. Friday: 9:00 a.m. to 7:00 

p.m. Saturday) 

Less than B weekly.. 45.00 32.00 

6 weekly 43.00 258.00 30.00 180.00 

12 weekly 40.00 4so.oo 28. no sm.oo 

18 weekly 3o.uo 630.00 25.00 450.00 

24 weekly 32.00 768.00 22.00 528.00 

3n weekly 27.00 810.00 19.00 570.00 

(6:00 a.m. to 7:00 a.m. Monday through Sat- 
urday and all day Sunday) 

Less than G weekly.. 30.00 21.00 

6 weekly 27.00 162.00 20.00 120.00 

12 weekly 23.00 276.00 19.00 228.00 

18 weekly 22.00 396.00 18.00 324.00 

24 weekly 21.00 504.00 17.00 408.00 

30 weekly 20.00 COO. 00 16.00 480.00 

(10:30 p.m. to 0:00 a.m. Monday through Friday) 

Less than 6 weekly.. 20.00 14.00 

6 weekly 18.00 108.00 13.00 78.00 

12 weekly 16.00 102.00 12. no 144.00 

18 weekly 15.00 270.00 11.00 198.00 

24 weeklv 14.00 336.00 10.00 240.00 

30 weekly 13.00 390.00 9.00 270.00 

("Friday Night Frolic"— 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 
p.m. and "Grand Ole Opry" — 7:00 p.m. to 
10:30 p.m. Saturday, announcements adjacencies) 

Less than 6 weekly.. 75.00 65.00 

6 weekly 73.00 438.00 63.00 378.00 

12 weekly 71.00 852.00 61.00 732.00 




18 weekly 69.00 1,242.00 

24 weekly 07.00 1,608.00 

30 weekly 65.00 1.950.00 



59.00 1,062.00 
57.00 1,308.00 
55.00 1.650. 00 



IDENTIFICATIONS 
50% of applicable 1-minute rate. Minutes, station- 
breaks and ID'S may be combined fur maximum fre- 
quency. 

SPECIAL FEATURES 
News Service — AP, UPI. 

Grand Ole Opry— following rates are for both time 
and talent and are flat, no discounts: 

Per 1/2 hour between 7:30 & 10:30 p.m 500.00 

Per 1/2 Iwur between 10:30 & 11:00 p.m 300.00 

Pet 1 2 hour between 11:00 p.m. and 12:00 

midnight 200.00 

Per 1/4 hour between 7:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

and 10:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m 275.00 

Per 1/4 hr. between 10:30 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. 200.00 
Per 1/4 hour between 11:00 p.m. and 12:00 

midnight 150.00 

"Noontime Neighbors" — Following rates are for both 
time and talent and are flat — no discounts: 

Per week 

1 ti. 3 ti. 5 tl. 

1/2 hour 200.00 525.00 800.00 



Class "B" 
Class "C" 
Cless "D" 

Discounts 



News — .Monday through Friday: 

Class "A", flat per week 4fjJ 

, flat per week 3 f 

, flat per week 3 1 

, flat per week 2 

DISCOUNTS 
allowed retroactively on the nurnbet* 
consecutive broadcasts given within a* year. Annoti* 
ments and program periods cannot be combine 
earn larger discounts. The above rates are gua j 
teed for a period of six months from the dat|» 
first broadcast or for six months from effective 
of any increase in these rates, providing advertl 
is actually running at the time of effective da! 
the increase and providing that the broadcasts I 
tinue without interruption. 
Closing Time 

Typewritten or printed copies of addresses or 
m.ist be submitted for station's approval at lea; I 
hours in advance aiul must conform to policie I 
station management. 

Reprinted from Spot Radio Rates id 
Data, July 1, 1959 









24 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 19. : 



Third largest nighttime audience in 




One-tenth of the population of the entire United 
States lives in the 766 Counties that make up the 
WSM Nighttime Radio Market. This intensely loyal 
audience represents a market of such size and buy- 
ing power that it must be reached by any advertiser 
desiring to sell the Central South. 



Pro Rata Cost Per State 
Weekly Daytime Audience 



Number* 



Pro Rata 
% of WSM Weakly SUI. Cool 
Total Audience <1 mm. 1 tin 
5M.0M homo. M6.0D1 



TENNESSEE 


295.848 


56% 


(25.20 


KENTUCKY 


128.554 


24% 


10.80 


ALABAMA 


66.931 


12% 


5.40 


Mo. Ark. Miss.. (U. 








and Misc SUlei 


34.754 


8% 


3.60 


^^ ^^^TT 






Pro RaU 




Number ot 


% of WSM Weakly 


State Coal 




Radio Homo* 


Total Audiancf 


(1 min. 1 time 




Reached 


' 1.0M,4Ww wOfTtM ' 


$48.00) 


TENNESSEE 


279,885 


26% 


511.70 


KENTUCKY 


174.111 


16% 


7.20 


ALABAMA 


124.493 


11. 6* 


5.22 


ARKANSAS 


47.293 


4.4% 


2.00 


FLORIDA 


22.118 


20% 


.90 


GEORGIA 


60.442 


56% 


2.52 


ILLINOIS 


14.144 


13% 


58 


INDIANA 


6.682 


6% 


.27 


IOWA 


1.690 


1% 


.04 


KANSAS 


2.061 


1% 


.04 


LOUISIANA 


2S.306 


2.3% 


1.03 


MISSISSIPPI 


70,272 


66% 


2.97 


MISSOURI 


S2.2S0 


4.9% 


221 


NEBRASKA 


2.S60 


2% 


.09 


NORTH CAROLINA 


55.696 


5.1% 


2.30 


OKLAHOMA 


9,970 


1% 


.04 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


34.611 


32% 


144 


TEXAS 


14.59? 


13% 


.59 


VIRGINIA 


33.818 


31% 


1.40 


Wf SI VIRGINIA 


31.091 


29% 


131 



delivers extensive coverage throughout the entire Central South. This 
coverage, plus WSM's unprecedented live programing, Grand Ole Opry talent, and farm service 
offers the advertiser a sales tool of extraordinary effectiveness at low cost. 



WSM MARKET DATA based on Nielsen Surveij (SRDS Consumer Markets) 



STATE 


POPULA- 


r>f 


CONSUMER 


TOTAL 


<r of Counties) 


TION 


STATE 


INCOME 


RETAIL SALES 


abama (51) 


1,908,600 


59% 


$ 2,212,073,000 


$ 1.387,541,000 


rkansas (50) 


836,000 


47% 


926,623,000 


653,022,000 


orida (34) 


584,700 


13% 


454,654,000 


542,377,000 


sorgia (105) 


1,425.300 


37% 


1,433,944,000 


1,010.829.000 


inois (21) 


341.700 


3% 


435,654,000 


280,191.000 


diana (8) 


165,300 


4% 


236,009,000 


143,625,000 


wa(3) 


44,900 


2% 


60,775.000 


45.329.000 


ansas (4) 


65,000 


3% 


75.518.000 


80.125.000 


entucky (98) 


1,874,900 


61% 


1.988.029,000 


1,238.691.000 


imsiana (22) 


589.800 


19% 


558,225.000 


340,874,000 


ississippi (62) 


1,291,600 


59% 


1.079.304,000 


791,147.000 


tssoun (62) 


1,013,600 


24% 


1.109.714,000 


911,098.000 


ebraska (9) 


74,600 


5% 


103,690.000 


84,308.000 


o. Carolina (46) 


1.551,800 


34% 


1.669,137,000 


1.112.908.000 


■dahoma (19) 


306,800 


13% 


333,737,000 


242.498.000 


). Carolina (23) 


872,900 


36% 


980,782.000 


639.443.000 


■nnessee (83) 


2,106,300 


60% 


2.505,453.000 


1,664.295.000 


■xas (15) 


341,400 


4% 


422,311,000 


385.858.000 


rginia (21) 


717,800 


18% 


643,588,000 


493,003,000 


5St Virginia (28) 


752,800 


38% 


862,885,000 


470,213,000 


sconsin (2) 


22,200 


1% 


25,718.000 


18,927,000 


TOTAL 


16,888,600 




$187117,823,000" 


$12,536,302,000 


PONSOR • 


11 JULY 


1959 







< 



based on Hielsen Coverage Service Survey 2- 
areas in which WSM has reportable day or night 
market coverage; SRDS 1 J 59 Consumer Market Data 




Clear Channel 50,000 Watts 

Bob Cooper, Manager 
REPRESENTED BY 

JOHN BLAIR & COMPANY 

owned and operated by 
The National Life and Accident Insurance Company 



25 




Having a 47-county 
Oklahoma Community 
Coverage poses a responsi- 
bility to KWTV in the 
field of public service. 
Every other Wednesday, 
J. Howard Edmondson, 
Oklahoma's youthful 
Governor spends a Class A 
half-hour with KWTV's 
News Director, Bruce 
Palmer, in reporting to the 
KWTV Community. At 
times, the Governor has 
asked for letters and 
telegrams in expression of 
the people's views on an 
issue. Literally thousands of 
replies have opened the 
eyes of many Oklahoma 
egislators to the feelings 
of the people. 
Powerful proof of 
KWTV's 47-county 
Oklahoma community 
coverage, service and 
AUDIENCE! 



BffYfh TO MR Mft SAUSfiom to Otfofam! 

See your PETRYman 




WBNS Radio 

Columbus, Ohio 

John Blair & Co., Representatives 




Our sixth annual free Zinnia Seed offer brought 
23,727 requests from 232 towns in 58 out of 88 
Ohio counties. This even out-pulses our Pulse. 



26 






49th ai 
Madis< 



Sponsor Backstage 

1 was very much interested in the 

2 May column. I like to see people 
getting away from always multiplying 
the same numbers by the same other 
numbers. One always comes up with 
the same answers that way, and it's 
not surprising the change is so hard 
to affect. Change begins to be observ- 
able when someone says: "Wonder 
what would happen if we multiplied 
x by z instead of by y." To do this, 
one doesn't even need to know wheth- 
er x and y and z are the kinds of 
numbers that can be multiplied. All 
you have to do is punch them into a 
machine and see what comes out. You 
can do it with telephone numbers, 
program ratings or the number of 
stitches Aunt Minnie dropped when 
she knitted her last sweater. At least, 
let's try it and see what happens. We 
know at least one thing will happen: 
someone is going to have to think. 

I suggest that you could go one 
step further when you make analyses 
like the one on 2 May. After you 
have played around with the top ten, 
do the same thing with the bottom 
ten — or ten from farther down on the 
list. If what you say about the top' 
ten is also true about the bottom ten! 
— but in reverse — you've got some- 
thing. 

Kenneth H. Baker 
v.p. KBES-TV 
Medford, Ore. 

Co-op — sell the retailer! 
The first article of your two-part 
series does a splendid job of pointing 
up both the evils and advantages of 
co-op advertising, and describes ex- 
cellently both the excuses many man- 
ufacturers use to rule out radio and 
tv and the falseness of these excuses. 

I do hope however that Part Two 
will come to grips with what has 
always seemed to me to be the funda- 
mental reason for this apparent dis- 
crimination — acceptance. 

For tv, acceptance is a relatively 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 




JUST OUT! 

March Pulse Survey 

FIRST 

l ! 1 in 
PEORIA" 



FIRST 

in total 
AUDIENCE! 

PLUS MORE ADULT 
jj LISTENERS THAN ANY 
OTHER PEORIA 
RADIO STATION 
6:00 A.M. -12:00 Midnight 
WMBD Radio Dominates 
the Peoria Area. 

AND FIRST WITH 

NATIONAL 

ADVERTISERS 

70% USE WMBD 

EXCLUSIVELY 
Week of March 16, 1959 
44 National Advertisers 

in Peoria Market 
(Scottie Bureau) 

WMBD MARKET DATA 

Population 531,900 

Households 165,000 

Retail Sales $725,261,750 

Food Sales $142,488,750 

Drug Sales $ 17,826,250 

Effective Buying Income 

$991,150,000 
Income per Household $ 6,007 

EXCLUSIVE 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. 

mm 



difficult achievement for a medium 
which in many major markets has 
heen forced to price itself beyond the 
reach of many retailers. 

This is not an excuse for radio, 
however. The fact is, it seems to me, 
that co-operative advertising — which 
is advertising designed by manufac- 
turers for the fundamental purpose of 
benefiting their retail outlets — must 
by its very nature be retailer-con- 
trolled to a tremendous extent. 

Neither radio nor tv has ever de- 
veloped, as a medium, the deep, 
warm, personal intimacy which exists 
between the retailer and the news- 
paper. 1 1 refer you to your own 
articles— "Food : $50 Billion Chal- 
lenge," 23 and 30 May I . 

This is by no means a condemna- 
tion of either medium. Both are 
young, strong, boisterous media which 
have been able to capitalize so tre- 
mendously on their capacity to cap- 
ture the imagination that they have 
had no great need to resort to greater 
sales-subtlety. 

When radio — and tv — succeed in 
cultivating the retailer's warm and 
deep friendship and intimacy, I feel 
confident a full share of co-op — along 
with many other commercial achieve- 
ments undreamed of today — will be 
amply available. And with so many 
fine broadcasters working so well to 
that end, it will not take too long. 

Morton Lowenstein 
Phila. Spot Sales 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Plaudits for statistics 
I've derived so much benefit from 
your bright and informative June 
20th issue that I feel impelled to say 
so. If more readers made their likes 
and dislikes known to publishers, 
service magazines could provide in- 
creasingly helpful service. 

Of particular interest and benefit 
to me always are the "case history" 
articles such as those on Shulton and 
Ronzoni in this issue. By reading in 
detail about the "why's" of specific 
strategy and success. I feel better able 
to produce and judge creative ideas 
advertising and selling. 

I'm sure that the majority of your 
readers profit from and look forward 
to these case histories in sponsor 
weekly. Again, my compliments and 
best wishes. 

Samm Sinclair Baker 
Donahue & Coe 
Neu York 



npnraa 




RENEWALS POURING 

IN FOR O *^ 
YEAR! 



Already renewed for next 
season in market after market, 
JEFF'S COLLIE proves itself 
the "sponsor's best friend!" 

Washington 

Baltimore 

Minneapolis 

Cincinnati 

Honolulu 

Lincoln 

South Bend 

. . . and many more! 

Inquire about availabilities 
in your market! 




488 Madison Ave. 



I^ONSOR 



11 july 1959 



N.Y. 22 • PLaza 5-2100 

27 



The three top-rated personalities 
in New Orleans are on... 




MISS GIN NY with Romper Room 

Miss Ginny has proven that it is possible to build 
a big morning audience. On Romper Room she 
presents games, films, storybook time — entertain- 
ment that makes kids 6 to 60 come back for more 
all week long. 



WWL-TV 

Channel 4 

NIORGUS the Magnificent 
on House of Shock 

Check the ratings, any ratings, and you'll se 
that Morgus and the House of Shock rate top 
on Saturday night TV in New Orleans. This i 
the man whose fans have tied up an entin 
telephone exchange "just to talk with Morgus.' 
The Senior Class at Tulane University School o 
Medicine has awarded Morgus an "honorary 
degree" in medicine — and he's being boosted 
a candidate for Governor of Louisiana! 







UNCLE HENRY 

with Popeye & Pals 

Weekdays at 5:15 kids all over town flocl 
to tune in the Pied Piper of New Orlean 
— Uncle Henry Dupre. They love thi^ 
genial entertainer, whose television ant 
radio career in New Orleans spans 27 years 



Represented nationally 
by the Katz Agency 



NEW ORLEANS 




28 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 195* 



SPONSOR 

11 JULY 1959 



RADIO RESEARCH 




ARE ADMEN WRONG ABOUT IT? 

VHEN AGENCY MEN INSIST THERE ISNT ENOUGH RESEARCH ON 
tADIO, THEY ARE CLOSING THEIR EYES, SAY BROADCASTERS 



jF all the individual printed pieces of basic radio pile close to eight stories high and would weigh in 

-carch turned out last year were filed in one place, the neighborhood of a ton-and-a-half. 

would take a file drawer about 35 feet long. The Pulse alone turns out about 16 feet of radio 

If every piece of station or rep firm promotional ratings each year. 

I'search (either based on the basic research or de- In the last five years, Radio Advertising Bureau's 

i 'loped fresh at local level) were added to this total bill for basic radio research amounted to more 

indie of paper, it would probably make a single than $2.5 million. 



ONSOR 



11 july 1959 



29 



Yet some admen are prone to say 
that radio needs a lot more research. 

In its 13 June issue, sponsor re- 
ported a poll of admen in the 20 top 
agencies ("Why radio is hurting for 
facts" ) . found them professing a 
need for much more research by ra- 
dio before the medium could stack 
up against its competitors — tv, news- 
papers, magazines. 

It is highly unlikely that anything 
this article reveals will change the 
opinions of these admen; they will 
stick to their premise. 

But the fact remains that no other 
medium, over the years and currently, 
has been more thoroughly researched 
than radio. 

Want to know how many listen to 
Station X in market Y? Pulse. Niel- 
sen and Hooper can tell you the facts. 




Want to know what medium the 
housewife was last exposed to before 
she took off for the supermarket? 
Ask Radio Advertising Bureau. 

Want to know how many teenagers 
are tuned in at 4:30 p.m.? Ask any 
of the rating services. 

Want to know who is listening at 
the beaches or summer cottages? 
Want to know what stations in an 
area car radios are tuned to? Try 
the same sources; they have the dope. 

Want to know what kind of music 
the 35-year-old housewife prefers on 
radio? Ask Ohio State University. 

And if you want to know how much 
money the average fm aficionado 
earns a year and whether he finished 
college — well, there are answers for 
that. too. Radio has plenty of answers. 

The answers are available from 



P 






many sources — rating services, RAB, 
Station Representatives Association, 
Institute for Motivational Research, 
market research organizations such 
as Vicary or Politz, networks, sta4 
tions, station groups, station rep 
firms. Broadcast Advertiser Reports, 
sponsor and other trade magazines. 

Reactions to sponsor's recent piece 
were sometimes volcanic. 

"Nonsense," said one adman. "No 
other medium — print or tv — can 
come up with anything approaching 
the quantity and depth of radio re- 
search." 

"Radio is researched from hell to 
breakfast," said another. "Maybe 
there's so much stuff available they 
can't see the woods for the trees." 

Maybe they can; maybe they can't. 
The fact remains, there are plenty of 








CUSTOMER RESEARCH: In a supermarket (I), RAB 
conducts its new "On-Target" study on actual purchasers, 
finds six out of 10 buyers of frozen foods are reached by 
radio on day of buying. IN-HOME RESEARCH: A 
Pulse interviewer (above) probes listening pattern of a 
U.S. radio family. PROMOTIONAL RESEARCH: Rep 
firms, networks and stations turn out endless stream of 
data. At Adam Young Inc. (r), the research team puts 
together new 60-market radio report as a guide to buyers 




facts around if media buyers care 
enough to look for them. This is the 
contention of most broadcasters and 
some admen who took exception to 
the recent sponsor article. 

Before hauling out the criticisms 
of that story, here is a recap on 
what the story was about, what ad- 
men said that was wrong with radio 
research: (1) Radios lack of facts 
makes it a defensive in-fighter. (2) 
Tv and print research is broader, 
more persuasive. (3) Not enough 
money is being spent on radio re- 
search. (4) Ratings stress metro 
rather than total area tune-in. (5) 
There s too much reliance on cost- 
per- 1.000 figures. 

"The only valid point," says Dr. 
S\d Roslow, head of The Pulse, "is 
the part about too much reliance on 
cost-per-1.000. That's perfectly true. 
We've always said that a rating is 
not a price tag for anything — that it's 
far better to have a smaller audience 
of customers and prospects than a 
big audience of the 'I-don't-cares.' 

On all the other points brought up 
by admen, Roslow disagrees vehe- 
mently. "The views of these repre- 
sentatives of the top 20 agencies is 
Mizzling," he told sponsor. "One 



has onl\ to take a look at the recent 
Radio Advertising Bureau dollar fig- 
ure estimates for the top 20 investors 
in spot radio. Of the top 20 clients, 
13 are represented by agencies within 
the select group which felt radio was 
lacking in research. These 13 agen- 
cies bought some $33.5 million worth 
of spot radio. 

"General Motors $5.4 million," 
continued Roslow, "was not invested 
by mediocre agencies, and J\\ T 
would certainly denv that it spent $5 
million for Ford out of blissful ignor- 
ance. The cigarette companies [See 
Where there's smoke there's radio, 
sponsor 4 July] apparently were 
satisfied with radio's statistics. Ameri- 
can Tobacco didn't spend $4.6 mil- 
lion last year just for fun. nor did 
R. J. Reynolds with its $4.7 million 
investment. 

Sure there are a few copy cats 
who are impressed by the 'No Sale" 
sign of some large food and soap 
manufacturers. But what is mis- 
leading about radio advertising is 
some quickie thinking confined al- 
most exclusively to certain big 'bell- 
wether' accounts. If you check the 
whole RAB list, however — not just 
these misleading toppers — the ex- 



penditures of the savvy blue chips 
roll up into an impressive volume. 

"Now," said Roslow. who has been 
scrutinizing radio since 1941, "add to 
this the fact that local radio adver- 
tising last year hit $370 million." 

This latter point is irrefutable. The 
local radio advertiser has been on 
the media scene a long time, and 
since the beginnings of radio it has 
been he — without voluminous num- 
bers and evidence — who has led the 
national advertiser and his agenc) 
through the radio wonderland. It was 
the local merchant who first discov- 
ered the prime time of night broad- 
casting in the earliest da\ s of radio 
when families huddled around the 
super-hetrodynes logging distant sig- 
nals. After he discovered the golden 
hours, he was repaid b\ being 
squeezed out of them during net ra- 
dio's hey-da\ b\ the national ac- 
counts. So he simpl) went out and 
discovered new times to advertise 
the radio times that are worshipped 
today bv the same nationals who have 
since pulled out of nighttime the 
traffic hours of 7 to ° a.m. and 1 to 
(> p.m. 

The local merchant always has been 
satisfied with a minimum of radio 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



31 



research. So long as store traffic is 
heavy and the cash register rings 
frequently, he has all the proof he 
needs on radio's efficacy. 

"Actually." says Roslow, "the 'trou- 
ble' with radio could be that it is 
over-researched. It has been reduced 
to the same myopic scrutiny as trade 
papers. In comparison with any other 



consumer medium, radio has such a 
glut of information that it sometimes 
seems hard to sort out." 

Whether such information is hard 
to sort out or not, the fact remains 
that there are answers to just about 
every conceivable question one might 
ask about radio, and they are being 
sorted out by many careful buyers. 



SO WHAT DO YOU WANT TO KNOW? 



TOTAL REACH OF RADIO 

No. of sets, car radios, portables, etc., ask RAB. Total homes 
reached in week — Nielsen. Homes a station day or week — Pulse 



REACH AMONG SPECIFIC CUSTOMERS 

For hours of listening, weekly percentages and other qualita- 
tive facts about working women, housewives, teenagers — RAB 



GROWTH IN RADIO POPULARITY 

For billings growth, ask Mc-E or FCC. For increase in the sale 
of radios — Electronics Industries. Telurbia study — RAB. 



RADIO'S CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE 

A whole series of studies showing what can be delivered with 
various schedules {ie., 20 one-minutes on two stations) — RAB 



RADIO IMPACT ON SPECIFIC PRODUCTS 

What is radio's effect on a housewife on day of purchase; 
RAB's Supermarket Last Word and On-Target give answers 



TIME SPENT WITH RADIO VS. OTHER MEDIA 

A whole series of comparative studies on a nationwide basis 
(radio vs. print, tv) on tap from Albert Sindlinger, Phila. 



WHO'S DOING WHAT IN RADIO 

For a rundown on national advertisers, what they're spending 
in radio, their strategies and successes, RAB reports regularly 



The chart on page 32 is a guide to 
some of the basic questions that an 
advertiser might need in planning a' 
campaign together with several of the 
sources that have the answers on 
hand. 

The 25 July issue of SPONSOR will 
be accompanied by the 232-page Air 
Media Basics (see page 35). A 
whole section of this book will be 
jammed with facts on both spot and 
network radio — dimensions, adver- 
tiser spending, audience habits, and! I 
just about everything else relative to f 
the medium. 

Some of the most pointed and im- 
pressive radio research being con- 
ducted today is by Radio Advertising 
Bureau. This is a research program 
it calls "On-Target Advertising." 

Results on the first phase of this 
study were just revealed by RAB in 
a four-page brochure and they docu- 
ment the media exposure pattern 
among buyers of frozen foods. 

Two highlights: (1) More than six 
out of 10 actual purchasers of frozen 
foods are reached by radio on the day 
they buy. (2) Most of these buyers 
hear radio during time periods out-, 
side radio's so-called "prime times.': 

This is onlv the beginning of RAB's 
"On-Target." A series of similar 
studies are being launched in markets 
across the U.S. via personal inter- 
views with actual buyers at the check- 
out counters of supermarkets. Data is 
gathered by Fact Finders Asso. In| 
addition to studies on purchasers ol 
various categories of grocerv prod- 
ucts, RAB will be doing similar "On- 
Targets" for products other than 
foods, and offers research cooDera 
tion to advertisers interested iri 
launching such studies in connection 
with test radio campaigns. 

Several leading national manufac- 
turers have already responded with 
requests for such special research tc 
probe radio exposure among buyers 
of their products. 

"Two of these already are 
launched," says Kevin B. Sweeney] 
RAB president. "The 'on-target' con 
cept can become an extremely valu 
able tool in media planning," he says 
"It offers a pre-check of a proposec 
radio campaign, reveals with preci 
sion the percentage of actual buyers 
of specific products that can be 
reached within given time periods. ' 

While "On-Target" is a brand new 

(Please turn to page 70) 



32 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 195? 




SPOT TV 

FOR THE ERA OF 

VANISHING 

SALESMEN 



ODAY, the destiny of the whole U. S. economy is in the hands of sales 
necutives, says new Kati presentation, urging sales use of spot tv 



^ New Katz study urges sales managers to place 10% 
>f budgets in tv spot to offset drop in personal selling 

^ High costs, manpower problems are forcing Ameri- 
an businessmen to cut down on in-person salesmanship 



I he startling, but well documented 
(•commendation that modern mar- 
eters should devote 10% of sales (as 

ell as advertising ) budgets to tv 
pot, was advanced in New York this 
.eek by Halsey V. Barrett, manager 

\ New Business Development. The 



Katz Agency, station representatives. 
Barretts proposal grows out of a 
comprehensive study of modern dis- 
tribution and marketing problems 
which forms the basis of a new Katz 
presentation. "Spot Tv, The Sales 
Managers Medium," to be given this 



month to a picked group of sales ex- 
ecutives. 

Quoting Paul Mazur, senior part- 
ner. Lehman Bros., who believes that 
"not purchasing power but purchases, 
and not production but consumption 
are the ruling factors in our econo- 
m\ ." the Katz report points out that 
over a 10-year period American pro- 
duction efficiency increased by 64%, 
while distribution I sales) efficiency 
increased only 22' < . 

To meet this challenge, says Bar- 
rett, sales managers must find new 
ways to cope with the problem of the 
"vanishing salesman," one of the 






AUTO DEALER COSTS-PER-1,000 SALES CONTACTS 




IN-PERSON $20,500 




iCwlKIU* W fj|f 3' 



TELEVISION IN PERSON $.50-$3.50 



Halsey V . Barrett, mgr. Tv New Business Development, the Katz Agency, station representatives, shows 
dramatically the high cost of sales calls in the automobile dealer business with this chart. Average 
dealer cost-per-sales contact is $20. This figures out to a cost-per-1.000 of $20,000 compared to CPM s 
for tv spot of 50^ to $3.50. Says Barrett, "Spot tv is todays best person-to-person salesman, and the 
only one ivhich many lines can afford." Tv spot ha . no vacations, off days, travel or expense accounts 



I PONSOR 



11 july 1959 



33 



ipill!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllllllillllllllllllllll!l illlli!lllllll!'lllllll!!llllllllllllllll!ll!lllllllllllilW IllllllllllllllllllliHl 



B-M SALES V.P. PRAISES STUDY 



F. Harry Fletcher, vice presi- 
dent and director of sales for 
the Bristol-Myers Co., was one 
of the first sales executives to 
see the Katz presentation on 
"Spot Tv — The Sales Mana- 
ger's Medium." Here are 
his comments on the study. 



"In your presentation 'Sales Managers Medium,' the anal- 
ogy between a company's sales organization and your 
medium makes sense. Your facts show the parallel be- 
tween how a sales manager apportions and sets up his 
sales force and how you propose American companies use 
1 national spot television." § 

liiillliiillliiillllllllliliilillllillililiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiliiilllllliiillliiliiw 




most striking phenomena cf modern 
marketing. 

There are proportionately far fewer 
salesmen of all types today than there 
were 20 years ago. U. S. Census fig- 
ures (19561 showed only one per 85 
customers, compared with one per 39 
customers in 1939. 

Costs of in-person selling have 
kited. In industrial sales, for in- 
stance, the cost-per-sales call is now 
$55.96 vs. $35.51 in 1953. In prod- 
uct sales (manufacturer to middle 
man) the cost-per-sales call jumped 
61% in 10 years, from $10.72 to 
$17.29. 

Retail selling, long considered the 
weakest link in the sales chain, is 
growing weaker every year. The Katz 
presentation quotes Sales Manage- 
ment Magazine that "American busi- 
ness is rapidly eliminating the per- 
sonal salesman at every stage of dis- 
tribution." 

Today supermarkets do 85% of 
national grocery sales and 50' e of all 
health and beauty aid sales. Vending 
machines gross $2 billion a year and 
account for 16% of all cigarettes. 
21% of all candy. 30' , of all soft 
drinks. 

Faced with soaring costs for in- 

34 



person selling to dealers, and the fact 
that in certain lines the retail clerk is 
"going, going, gone," Katz advocates 
that sales managers turn to spot tv to 
fill the personal selling void. 

In making this proposal, the rep- 
resentative firm is appealing directly 
to an entirely new group of execu- 
tives, not merely to ad managers or 
agency men to whom most spot tv 
pitches are addressed. 

Spot tv should be considered "The 
Sales Managers Medium" says Bar- 
rett, because it solves distribution 
problems at both the middleman and 
consumer-retail levels. 

In five retail fields — appliances, 
new cars, gasoline, grocery and drugs 
— 3.100 dealers, when asked "which 
type of advertising placed by a manu- 
facturer helps you most in selling ad- 
vertised brands to customers?" gave 
63% of votes to tv. 

Tv works faster than other media. 
the Katz study points out, and for 
sales managers and retailers this time- 
factor is all-important because it is 
closely related to product turnover. 

Spot tv has a proven record in 
opening up distribution for national 
manufacturers ( Lestoil is an out- 
standing example ) and this makes it 



i 






a major weapon in any sales execu 
tive's arsenal. 

But chief among the reasons wh) 
spot tv is the "Sales Managers Me 
dium," is that it can be used market 
by-market according to distributior 
patterns and sales strategy. 

"As sales manager," points ou 
Barrett, "you wouldn't send salesmei 
to Hogi Pogi, New Mexico, if yoi 
haven't distribution (and aren't read) 
for distribution) there. And yoi 
don't have to with spot tv. Spot tv 
means no wasted manpower." 

The Katz presentation outlines sug J 
gested strategies for sales manager; 
using spot tv ("your tv commercia 
salesmen"). Among them are these 

1) Use spot tv to match competi 
live standing and needs. Brand sta 
tus and competition vary market-by 
market. ( G.E. washers are 1st in New 
ark. 7th in Denver. Plymouth car 
are 3rd in Columbus, 6th in Milwau 
kee). Strategic use of spot tv recog 
nizes such situations. 

2. Use spot tv to capitalize 
stronger markets. Spot tv can keep I 
"hot" market and a "hot market" cai 
"snow" competition, prompt repea 
purchases. 

3. Use spot tv to bolster weake\ 
markets. Heavying up a spot tv sched 
ule can aid in overtaking competij 
tion, speeding up consumer buyinl 
preference, because your "Tv Coni 
mercial Salesman" is making mor 
calls per week. 

4. Get the market-by-market im 
pact you need. Spot tv's flexibilio 
allows pressure planning by market! 
Successful users vary number of t 
spots in different markets for plannei 
impact. 

In talking to sales managers, th 
Katz presentation stresses certain sp< 
tv fundamentals which are ofte 
skipped over lightly in discussioi, 
with agency media directors and tim 
buyers. 

For instance, the study spells oi 
for sales executives the different wai 
in which tv spot can be used — a nanj 
star with his own program (syndicj 
tion I a name star via announcement 
or participations, a local star, an an 
mation salesmen or "any other for 
of persuasion you find suitable f< 
electronic person-to-person salesma J 
ship." 

The presentation also emphasizi 

that tv spot covers "your most logic 

(Please turn to page 75 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 19! 



. 



sponsor's new 'Air Media Basics 7 



^ 232-page fact book, to be delivered with issue of 
25 July, is valuable, year-round aid for timebuyers 

^ Contains more than 200 important reference charts 
iiicl tables, plus SPONSOR'S new Five-City Ad Directory 



Ifw hat is easily the most valuable 
nd comprehensive "use book" ever 
evised for the radio/tv advertising 
usiness is being delivered to SPONSOR 
ubscribers as a supplement to our 
egular issue of 25 July. 

Tilled Air Media Basics, it is a 
it 232-page compilation of charts. 



graphs, tables and important statisti- 
cal information which you will want 
to keep on \ our desk 52 weeks a 
year, for ready reference and for aid 
in building recommendations, presen- 
tations and advertising plans. 

Air Media Basics replaces Fall 
Facts, published by sponsor for the 



past 1 1 years, and is a greatly im- 
proved, modernized version of that 
well-known and popular feature. De- 
signed as a practical working tool for 
agencies and advertisers, rather than 
as a "year book," it is packed with 
factual data. Some of the informa- 
tion in its six meaty sections is listed 
below. 

In addition. Air Media Basics 
contains such unusual compilations 
as, U.S. radio stations and their rep- 
resentatives, U.S. tv stations and their 
representatives, and Nielsen figures 
on tv homes and penetration by U.S. 
counties. Watch for your copy of 
Air Media Basics. ^ 



TIMEBUYING I 

overage basics 



Fundamentals and basic data on 
air media timebuying . . . a re- 
fresher course and introductory 
primer . . . charts and tables on 
ratings basics . . . cost basics . . . 
. audience basics . . . as well as a 
aluable section on useful standard tools for time- 
in ers and a checklist of helpful ''Timebuying Tips" 



iiiuiiiiiiii i mm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



BP^T^^B Kail in listening habits l>\ dm 
J ^ parts, months, seasons, regions 
p- mn j ... out-of-home listening . . . spot 
k A radio's cumulative audiences . . . 

^^» — .^flB radio spending b) industries. 
\ompanies, agencies . . . network radio patterns . . . 
adio's dimensions . . . homes, sets, stations by re- 
ion and by county, set sales by year and by type. 



in iiimiimmmi.i;:.: mi inn 



TELEVISION 



ranting trends 



Tv viewing habits . . winter, sum- 
1 m mer, by months, time zones, day 

I parts . . . tv costs and spending 
over 10 years . . . top agency and 
advertisers in tv . . . network pro- 
. . rating levels, station lineup 
'ends . . . no. of tv homes, by regions, county size . . . 
v stations of U.S. . . . Stations equipped for color. 



|^^*^^^B| Buyers guide on syndicated (dm 

V A ^ releases . . . major buyers of svn- 

...... - ,.».. I dication . . . cartoon and feature 

L FILM & TAPE J ,. . . ' 

^ M film releases . . . stations and pro- 

1^^—^^ ducers equipped for tv tape . . . 

time and program costs of syndication in top 50 U.S. 
markets . . . how to convert film feet to seconds and 
vice versa . . . glossary of film a nil tv tape terms. 

ilium Minium i ii mi n ii urn minimi minimum imiiiiii iiiuiiiiiiii iiiiiii i 

Marketing facts which every ad- 
man should have at his finger-tips 
. . . basics of population . . . 
trends and forecasts . . . consumer 
spending by age, sex, income 
groups and product categories . . . how major indus- 
tries market . . . basics of retailing . . . number of 
outlets by types . . . chains and independents' share. 




New. updated edition of spon- 
sor's popular phone and address 
directory of agencies, advertisers. 
networks, station representatives, 
trade associations, research or- 
ganizations, film programs and commercial sources 
along with other often-called numbers, in New \ ork, 
Chicago. Detroit, Los Angeles. San Francisco. 



SPONSOR 
5 -CITY 
DIRECTORY 



P0NS0R 



11 july 1959 



MARKETING'S A 'MUST 



^ Today's service -in -depth ad agency needs media 
buyers who know over-all ad strategy, experts contend 

^ Compton's Frank Kemp and Grey's Hal Davis trace 
reasons why there's new pressure for rounded ad pro 



I he "status seekers" in ad agen- 
cies are media people and buyers who 
are scrambling out of oblivion into 
the advertising limelight. And that's 
just the way it should be, in the opin- 
ion of ad pros who evaluate new func- 
tions of ad agencies in this changing 
marketing world. 

They contend that timebuyers, most 
specifically, should move from the 
dark, comptometer-dominated corners 



into the bright sunlight of client con- 
tact . . . and that the agency itself is 
responsible for pushing buyers and 
other key media people outward and 
upward. 

Here's the way agencies look at the 
situation according to statements made 
to sponsor this week by some agency 
execs : 

• Today's advertising and market- 
ing methods are in ferment, and agen- 



cies are confronted with challenges 
and competition as never before. 

• Media is facing responsibilities 
and demands which it has never be- 
fore been called on to meet; a need 
which has been heightened by the up- 
surge of television activity. 

• Media, as a strong link in the 
marketing-merchandising-creative ad 
campaign, demands strong people 
who are over-all advertising profes- 
sionals as well as media and buying 
specialists. 

• It's the modern, progressive 
agency's responsibility to enhance the 
status glow around its media people 
and to encourage them to be well-; 
rounded advertising specialists as 
well as media experts. 

"This is the year for agencies to 






MEDIA PROFICIENCY PLUS MARKETING FACTS 








MEDIA PLANNING: Compton's Frank Kemp, (I), media director, MARKET PLANNING: Media activity is geared to over-all client 
interprets media strategy as it relates to the broad marketing plan marketing plan developed by William M. Nevin, ( I), v. p., dir. of market 
with Maurice Sculfort, assoc. media director. They then brief buyers devel.; L. E. Horner, marketing executive. Buyers know market strategy 



36 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



. 



FOR SAVVY TIMEBUYERS 



soul-search/' says Hal Davis, vice 
president and assistant to the presi- 
dent of Grey Advertising agency. His 
major areas of responsibility: tv and 
radio. 

''Many an agency is still declining 
to practice what it preaches" in terms 
of establishing a theoretical account 
group system and then not really let- 
ting it work as blueprinted, he con- 
tends. And the modern agency, predi- 
cated on the account group plan, must 
see that each contributor to a prod- 
uct or account group — buyer, re- 
searcher, marketer, copywriter, ac- 
count man — is fully briefed on the 
needs and the marketing strategy of 
that client. 

He and other agency colleagues 
agree that the day of the "strong 



straw man" — the single account ex- 
ecutive who is the sole client contact 
and who is Mr. Agency for his ac- 
count — is waning. Today, as Hal 
Davis says, "the client likes to know 
the full professional force of an agen- 
cy is behind him, and he wants to 
know who those people are." 

The modern account man delights 
in parading his stable of talent and in 
showing his client that the best serv- 
ice and advertising decisions are 
made in his behalf by competent pro- 
fessionals. This is particularly true 
of the buyer in this era, for too often 
the buyer and his media colleagues 
have been categorized as eager bea- 
vers working in splendid isolation 
with slide rules. Friden calculators 
and reams of availability sheets. 



Frank Kemp, media director of 
Compton Advertising. sa\s the time- 
buyer must have as much background 
information on an account as possi- 
ble before the actual buying begins. 
The progression: marketing strategy 
is determined by the account man 
and the client, ramified b\ the depart- 
ment heads, approved by the client in 
final form and then interpreted to 
all of the people who work on that 
particular account. 

To see that there is consistencv and 
continuity, Compton issues an annual 
marketing plan which is drawn in 
broad strokes and filled in with the 
fine campaign lines as the need 
arises. Because the entire plan can't 
be pinpointed a year in advance, a 
{Please turn to page 73) 



LEAD TO WELL-ROUNDED, PROFESSIONAL BUYER 



ADMEN CHARGE it's the 

agency's responsibility to upgrade 
the media department and to educate 
buyers to modern marketing con- 
cepts. But neither the big nor small 
agency is fulfilling this pressing need. 
Larger agencies, with their complex 
group system of account planning, 
servicing, often have such a heavy 
workload that buyers have too little 
time for clients plans conferences. 
And smaller agencies frequently rely 
on a "front man" account exec who 
handles all client service with buyer 
haying on order and by rote. Pro- 
gressive admen think buyers should 
be more aware of all account activity. 




SERVICE IN DEPTH results from this blending of media and marketing in activity 
of buyers as they function cooperatively with all other units in Compton's group system, 
gaining more meaningful buys and better results, according to media director Kemp 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 



37 



SPOT TV 
GLAMORIZES 



G 



• it 



D OLD SALT 




AIM OF CAMPAIGN was to put smaller, higher profit package on table, while stressing utility 



^ Leslie Salt Co. aimed at higher returns on low-profit 
item, devised smaller package for use on dinner table 

^ Southern California test with 85% of budget in tv 
emphasized style, utility; led to new market expansion 



« ^» SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

^^alt. by its nature, is difficult to 
sell in comparative terms," says Ron 
Murphy, sales v.p. of Leslie Salt Co. 

To which he might add. "Salt, by- 
its nature, is difficult to make a profit 
on." 

To get around the brand similarity 
and low profit problem inherent in 
salt, this western salt producer has 
instituted a campaign to: 

• Create a style image for salt 

• Put the package on the table — 
thus selling the item in smaller units. 

The whole project is being launched 



via introduction of the "Finger-Tip 
Pak"' — a lightweight, foil-wrapped 
package holding less than half the 
salt of the customary 26-ounce size. 

Putting a new look into the salt 
business had to be augmented by 
some good utility. Leslie's solution : 
a three-way opening for shaking, 
measuring and pouring provided util- 
ity value for the kitchen, as well as 
a direct-to-the-table container. 

Murphy and Bob Haumesser, copy 
chief at Honig-Cooper. Harrington & 
Miner, laid out the basic copy points 
to be covered before settling on the 



media for introduction in the south- 
ern California-western Arizona area. 

( 1 ) High-style packaging. To pro- 
vide a cogent reason for a smaller 
size, higher profit package, use on the 
dinner table, at picnics and barbe- 
cues, must be emphasized, balanced 
against 

(2) Utility angle. Heavy emphasis 
on the "click-stop-top," as well as 

(3) Convenience. Lightweight, easy 
to store, no replenishing of salt 
shakers. Another consideration: 

(4) Smaller size. Though smaller. 
12-oz. pack still holds a full month's 
supply of salt. 

The agency's media recommenda- 
tion was made in light of these con- 
siderations. Agency media director 
Jack Davis outlined it this way: 

"Item: Tv spot announcements will 
permit purchase of schedules to fit 
distribution and budget allocations of 
each market. 






38 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



"Item: In terms of demonstration. 
we do not believe any other medium 
can compare with television for the 
particular needs of this special intro- 
duction. 

"Item: The combination of tv and 
newspapers, especially for retail price 
advertising on key food days has 
proven effective in creating retailer 
awareness. 

'"Thus," the recommendation con- 
cluded, "the agency recommends, in 
general, an 85% tv, 15% newspaper 
combination." 

Further, the agency felt that spots 
rather than programs could best con- 
vey its particular copy objectives. 
Nighttime I.D.'s and minutes, plus 
12-plan daytime minutes produced 
the optimum combination: a large 
daytime women audience plus high- 
rated evening exposure, both in suffi- 
cient frequency to highlight the new 
package and keep the Leslie brand 
image in the forefront. 

The schedule of minutes I both day- 




STYLE FACTOR in woman's hand extended 
from dump bin is studied by prod. mgr. 
Tom Nason (I), merch. assoc. Ron Berman 



time and evening) for the 13-week 
introduction: Los Angeles. 144: San 
Diego, 87; Phoenix, 135; Tucson. 
126. Three 1.000-line black and one- 
color ads were proposed to run every 
third week in 13 newspapers in the 
same markets. 

In addition to the tv-newspaper 
core, double-page two-color spreads 



were set in four Southern California 
and Arizona grocer) trade publica- 
tions: The Commercial Bulletin. 
Southern California Grocer's Journal, 
Food Mart Sews, Arizona Grocer. 

"Tn-store merchandising focused on 
the 'Finger-Tip' concept," says ac- 
count executive W. C. Anderson. "A 
plastic hand in gold sprouted from 
our store dump bins. It was intended 
to recall immediate!) the closeup of 
the graceful hand that opens the com- 
mercial and. hopefully, the accompa- 
ny ing audio: "Only Leslie remembers 
that you are a lad\.' " Shelf-talkers, 
wire hangers, channel strips and 
dealer mat service helped complete 
the collateral support. 

Forty-seven percent of the Leslie 
ad budget went into the introduction 
which kicked off in mid-Xovember. 
1958. 

"The introduction proved the 
soundness of the marketing and media 
strategy, ' says Leslies sales v. p. Ron 
I Please turn to page 71) 



MEDIA EMPHASIS was planned by (I to r) Clarice McCreary, timebuyer for H-C.H&M, a.e. W.C. Anderson and media director Jack Davis 




emphasis changed lokeep abreast i 
" would hat* to spend these amount eac, 



change 

smca 






-r— . 



r 4 






START OF pre-scoring process is conference between agency and music producer. Above, 
Y&R's Paul Blustain goes over copy and storyboards with Mitch Leigh of Music Makers 




ORIGINAL MUSIC is composed and performed, completing pre-recorded sound track. 
Leigh, above, conducts instrumental group. Final step is for pre-recorded music to be turned 
over to film producer for visuals to be made, and for voice track to be added in. Below, 
a scene from a Sanka commercial made through Y&R, pre-scored by Music Makers and 
filmed in squeeze-motion technique by Transfilm. For advantages of technique, see story 








Should you 

^ New 'music first' meth- 
od is a major commercials 
trend. Here agency people 
discuss many uses, pitfalls 






lewest of the current vogues for 
music in tv production is the use of 
pre-scoring in tv commercials. This 
season saw the rise of special scoring 
for tv programs and also an increased 
use of original music in commercials. 
Now. riding the crest of the music 
wave in tv, the technique of pre- 
scoring has become a main creative 
trend in tv commercials, both live 
and filmed. 

Pre-scoring is enabling agencies 
and producers to face baffling crea- 
tive and technical problems which 
now lend themselves to simple solu- 
tion. Duncan Hines, for example, in- 
troduced a new frozen food package 
and was able to make a commercial 
comprised almost entirely of product 
shots by means of pre-scoring. Prior 
to the introduction of the technique, 
P&G assumed that such a commercial 
was impossible to produce effectively. 

An advertiser using tv for the first 
time, Tek-Hughes, used pre-scoring to 
put across a mail offer for brushes. 

Johnson & Johnson elected to use 
pre-scoring to introduce Big Band 
Aid, a new product just being re- 
leased. 

Ford Motor Co. solved continuity 
problems with pre-scoring in its 
squeeze-motion commercials made 
earlier this season. 

General Foods relied on pre-scor- 
ing to get across emotional impact for 
live-motion commercials used to in- 
troduce its new breakfast product, 
Tang. 

There's hardly a product type that 
hasn't turned to pre-scoring in the 
past few months. Kaiser used it for 
its aluminum foil. Thorn McAn used 
pre-scoring for shoe commercials. In- 
stant Sanka coffee used it. Utica Club 



SPONSOR 



11 JULY 1959 



pre-score your tv commercials? 



beei employed the new technique for 
regional commercials. Scott Paper 
used it in a Scotties campaign, and 
Cutex, Lever Brothers for Praise, and 
Boj le-Midway for Aero-Shave are 
among pre-scoring's other users. 

When a new commercials technique 
is taken up by foods, cosmetics, auto- 
mobiles, soaps, clothing and house- 
hold products, it's news of universal 
import to agencymen. Pre-scoring 
is just such a technique. 

What is pre-scoring? The simplest 
definition in relation to commercials 
is this: Pre-scoring is the technique 
of making the music track first, and 
then producing the voice and visual 
elements afterwards. There's actu- 
allj nothing new in the idea of mak- 
ing the music first. But the new ap- 
plications are entirely new. 

The jumping-off point of pre-scor- 
ing in commercials production is ani- 
mation, where it's customary for the 
entire sound track to be completed be- 
fore any art work is done. However, 
pre-scoring is now being used with 
-queeze-motion commercials and with 
live-action film commercials. It was 
•also used with a two-minute live com- 
mercial during a recent Mary Martin 
spectacular. 

"Pre-scoring is a major creative 
trend in commercials for this coming 
season,"' stated Paul Blustain, Y&R's 
music director. "We're using twice 
as much original music in commer- 
cials as last year. Pre-scoring, in par- 
ticular, accounts for a lot of this 
added music use, and we've gotten 
successful results no other method 
can obtain." Among the Y&R clients 
who have employed pre-scoring are 
Johnson & Johnson for Big Band Aids 
; and baby powder, Tek, Kaiser Alu- 
minum and Sanka. 

Jay Kacin of Compton described 
pre-scoring as "A way of indicating 
i to the film producer exactly what's 
wanted at each point in the commer- 
cial, just as it later delivers to the 
viewer the emotional response that's 
• ailed for. Pre-scoring is especially 
i Please turn to page 44) 



HERE ARE 18 TV ADVERTISERS 
NOW AIRING PRE-SCORED SPOTS 

ADVERTISER PRODUCT AGENCY 


FOODS 


General Foods 


Tang 


Y&R 


General Foods 


Sanka 


Y&R 


P&G 


Duncan Hines 


COMPTON 


DRUGS, SOAPS AND COSMETICS 


Boyle-Midway 


Aero-Shave 


JWT 


Lever Brothers 


Praise 


K&E 


Northam Warren 


Cutex 


DDB 


Woolite 


Lastic-Lite ; Woolite 


HOYT 


Tek-Hughes 


Tek brushes 


V & R 


AUTOMOTIVE 


Ford Motor Co, 


Ford 


JWT 


Ford Motor Co, 


Mercury 


K&E 


CLOTHING 


Chemstrand 


nylon stockings 


DDB 


Thorn McAn 


shoes 


DDB 


HOUSEHOLD 


PRODUCTS 




Kaiser 


aluminum foil 


Y&R 


Scott Paper 


Scotties 


JWT 


Johnson & Johnson 


Big Band Aid 


Y&R 


Johnson & Johnson 


baby poivder 


Y&R 


BEER 


Utica Club 




DDB 





SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



41 



$100,000 re-run for a 1936 jingle 



^ Chateau Martin capitalizes on radio's remembrance 
values in all-new campaign keyed to current problems 

^ 23-year old jingle (older than Pepsi's 'nickel') goes 
to work in a $100,000 promotion to specific markets 



E3.i< k in 1936. an eastern wine 
maker beat Pepsi-Cola on the air with 
a singing jingle by about four months. 
Pepsi long ago ditched its pioneer 
"twice as much for a nickel, too,'" 
but the wine jingle is still around. 

It's had many uneasy moments — in 
fact total eclipses, while Chateau 
Martin Wines flirted with tv and news- 
papers. But now the jingle is back 
with the Chateau Martin budget of 
roughly $100,000 earmarked for radio 



year-round on the Atlantic seaboard. 
The reason the jingle has been 
brought back is to establish a hook 
with the past for a multi-purpose cam- 
paign geared to marketing problems 
that didn't exist 20 or even 10-years 
ago: 

• Price. Of growing importance 
with the advent of large-scale produc- 
ers since the war. price is an impor- 
tant emphasis. 

• Quality story. An airy jingle 



could put this across when aging 
processes were relatively uniform. But 
now, Martin Lefcort — 320-pound 
president of Eastern Wine Corp., 
Bronx, — feels his "aged in oak" pitch 
needs bearing down on with many 
hurry-up processes in use by competi- 
tors. 

• Market segmentation. Wine 
means different things to different 
people, and it must be marketed differ- 
ently ( i.e., to the Negro, Spanish, and 
general markets) . 

• Dealer attitudes. Increased com- 
petition and government regulations 
create problems of display and prod- 
uct positioning in liquor stores that 
have to be hurtled with advertising 
that makes sense to the dealer as well 
as the consumer. 

To meet these problems, Lawrence 
Curtis, Curtis Advertising; Co., New 



NEW RADIO APPROACH helped Chateau Martin's Martin Lefcort (r), adman Larry Curtis (c.) merchandise to dealers like Milton Cole 




ji'ork, brought Lefcort back into 
adio. But the way the Chateau Mar- 
in symbol I Gaston, the frivolous 
frenchman) is now being used is a 
ar cry from the days when his jingles 
md catch phrases did the whole job. 

To be sure, both jingles and Gas- 
on I who sings it) have their place 
n the metropolitan New York and 
Connecticut campaigns which kicked 
>ff Decoration Day. Here is how Cur- 
is broke down the markets in New 
fork and how the approach was 
ailored for each: 

i 1 i Negro and Spanish. Three sta- 
ions were bought on the basis of the 
lersonality involved rather than time 
Pattern: WWRL (25 60-second an- 
louncements per week covering Gos- 
>el Caravan, Doc Wheeler, Spanish 
"Ireakfast Club). WLIB (30 per 
Week). WOV (12 per week). The 
ast two buys concentrated on the 
Vegro market alone. Commercial for- 
nat: Gaston jingle lead-in followed 
>y ad-lib commercial by personality-. 

(2) Out-of-home audience. This 
\a> the target of the general ap- 
proach. The basic buy: 40 weekend 
i;pots in WOR's Flying Reporter, heli- 
opter traffic reports from Friday 
evening through Sunday. Here. Gas- 
on and the jingle were sacrificed al- 
ogether. Specific copy, timed to 30 
|econds. was used. Tone of the copy 
s factual and direct in keeping with 
he mood of the traffic reports. 

Behind these buys were some hard 
>asics of the wine business. Curtis 
joints out that in selecting and mer- 
handising media, the wine maker 
nust keep the dealer in mind for two 
pecific reasons: 

• Display. Under a state law. the 
lsual point-of-sale pieces are not per- 
nitted in liquor stores. It becomes 
ncreasingly important to suggest to 
lealers ways of displaying the product 
tself las Lefcort illustrates in the 
)icture on the opposite page). 

• Positioning of product. In a 
iquor store, shelf space and a dis- 
>lav. if you're lucky enough to get 
Jne. are only half the battle. If the 

UStomer puts the choice (based on 
'I ice i up to the clerk, he'll reach for 
i brand nearest the cash register. No 
natter how large you are along the 
•vail, this (and in the case of wines, in 
he refrigerator, as well) are the 
•rime locations. 
To maintain the right set of cir- 
I Please turn to page 72) 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 




CANDY CONFAB: Emil Mogul, MLW&S president, explains role of ad agencies and air 
media in America's $2.5 billion candy industry to II visiting candy manufacturer executives 
from Italy, Switzerland, Austria, England and West Germany on 2-week study tour of the U.S. 



CANDY UNITED NATIONS 
IS SWEET ON U. S. TV 



I 



n England, the top spender in tv 
is the candy and confection category. 
For the first time, this year, it passed 
soaps as prime user of tv. 

Italian candy manufacturers rank 
their advertising media in this order: 
111 weekly periodicals: (2 1 radio: 
(3) tv; (4 1 posters. 

In Austria, the candy industry uses 
newspapers and radio along with free 
samples to retail shops. 

Air media receive little from West 
German candy makers, most of the 
ad budgets going to newspapers and 
movie commercials. Tv commercials 
here are usually of three-minute dur- 
ation, but they almost all have to be 
crowded into a short period prior to 
8 p.m. when tv programing begins. 

These are just a few of the facts 
that were revealed the other after- 
noon in the N. Y. agency of Mogul 
Lewin Williams & Savior. 

It was a sort of United Nations of 
the candy industry — complete with 
interpreters. Taking part were 11 
leading candy manufacturers of Eng- 
land and the European continent on a 
two-week tour of the U. S. to stud) 
American methods of manufacture, 
distribution and advertising. 

MLW&S was the only ad agency 
the) visited. Reason: it has two cand) 
accounts representative of both ends 
of the U. S. cand\ business boxed 



and bar. The bar manufacturer is 
Gold Medal, which distributes nation- 
ally through supermarkets and chains. 
The boxed candy account is Barricini 
which distributes through 55 of its 
own stores in the East. 

Present at this sweet-tooth confab 
were Tico Bonomo. Gold Medal head 
and Milton Guttenplan, MLW&S 
v.p. and a.e. on Barricini. The 
overseas visitors appeared impressed 
to hear that in the U.S., candy is a 
$2.5 billion industry, that 35' , of the 
sales are through supermarkets (not 
yet a dominant outlet in Europe), 
that Gold Medal invests its entire ad 
budget in air media I spent nearly 
$200,000 in spot tv alone last year) 
and buys mostly kid tv shows. 

A half-dozen Gold Medal t\ com- 
mercials were screened, and the visi- 
tors I most of whom didn't understand 
a word of the audio I were then polled 
for their opinions. The group-Italians, 
Germans, Austrians. Swiss and Brit- 
ish were unanimous in their praise 
of a live-action spot that showed a 
small boy in airline garb as co-pilot 
of a plane, munching a Bonomo bar. 

"Simpatico," "identity, "would go 
great in my country" were their com- 
ments. European tv can prohabh 
look forward to a rash of candy tv 
commercials Featuring small boys in 
aii planes. ^ 



43 




in 

Sacramento 



rfv 



Looking for "Spending Power"? 

You'll find if on KCRA! The first 
Audience Composition Radiopulse 
ever taken in the Sacramento area 
shows a very high adult audience 
to KCRA in all time periods . . . 
number one in the 6 a.m. to 12 
midnight average. Ask your Petry 
Man for a look at this Audience 
Composition Survey. 

More Unduplicated Homes, Too! 

The last Pulse Cumulative Audi- 
ence Report also shows KCRA with 
the most unduplicated homes 
reached in the Sacramento area, 
both daily and weekly. Low CPM, 
too. Wise buy for your clients' 
dollars! 




PRE-SCORING 

{continued from page 41) 

good for dramatic impact, and for 
giving a tempo and unity to the whole 
commercial." 

Kacin commented on the broad per- 
spectives of pre-scoring within the 
film-making craft as well as some rel 
strictions of the techniques. He found 
pre-scoring to be a basic film tool 
and even found it discussed in classic 
works on film theory. On the other 
hand, he was quite specific on cases 
where pre-scoring should not be used, 
such as in live-action demonstration 
and "pitch" commercials. Nor did he 
feel that pre-scoring has anything to 
add to dramatized messages. 

Marie Gordon of J. Walter Thomp- 
son pointed out other practical appli- 
cations of pre-scoring: "With pre- 
scoring you can be certain that your 
timing is correct, and that the action 
of the commercial has the right ac- 
cents. Two types of live-action com- 
mercials that lend themselves espe- 
cially well to pre-scoring are those 
with highly stylized movement, and 
humorous commercials." Miss Gor- 
don also noted pitfalls to be avoided, 
including commercials that are based 
on optical tricks. For these, voice 
should come first, and then the opti- 
cals, with the music coming last. Also, 
certain types of visual stories should 
be done first to determine how long 
each motion takes. If these were to 
be pre-scored, the acting might be 
very distorted. 

Mitch Leigh, president of Music 
Makers, was very enthusiastic about 
pre-scoring and found the growth of 
the technique partly responsible for 
his company's increased activity in 
preparing and creating music for 
commercials. He said, "With pre- 
scoring, you get emotional impact 
from start to finish. There's no con- 
fusion in anyone's mind as to what's 
happening. The viewer knows imme- 
diately and intuitively what the feel- 
ing of the commercial is. Also, the 
parts of the commercial are blocked 
out according to musical form, so 
that the musical climax and conclu- 
sion in the coda corresponds to the 
conclusion of the commercial. It's 
the emotional payoff on both levels." 

Leigh described the process by 
which pre-scoring was used in a typi- 
cal case. He stressed one point above 
the others: "The music producer 
should come into the agency confer- 



DAVIS 




44 



. . . have never jailed 

in building sales for 

all kinds of products 

from A to Z . . . 

/Atlantic Gas 

Ij'eneficial Finance 

% arling Black Label Beer 

H_ 'odgc Trucks 

Electricity — Columbus & So. 

■ alstaff Beer 
Gillette Razors 
I I ills Brothers Coffee 
Ipana Toothpaste 
Johnson's Wax 

■ Xellogg's Sugar Frosted Flakes 
|_ucky Lager Beer 
▼%aola Dairy Products 
Nationwide Auto Insurance 
% 'hio Bell Telephone 
l-osr Grape-Nut Flakes 
I uakcr Company 
t< adio Corporation of America 
Schlitz 

I exaco 

United Red Feather 

▼ -8 Vegetable Juice 

TT ilson's Hams 
^L-tane 

7 ellow Pages 
£est 

The same creative thinkh 
and production know-how 
ready to go to work for yo 

PHIL DAVU 

MUSICAL ENTERPRISE 

Inc. 

MUrray Hill 8-3950 
59 East 54 Street New York 2. 

SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



ence on the commercial as early as 
possible." Starting with copy and a 

| storyboard, the music producer cre- 
ates a special musical scheme with 
parts corresponding to the segments 
of the commercial. Each of these 
segments then gets a specific emo- 
tional mood and is realized through 
coloristic use of musical instruments. 
If there is repetition or contrast or 
development, the pre-scored music 
goes to the heart of the structure in a 
manner designed to touch off imme- 
diate viewer responses. Sometimes 
the melody is paramount, and some- 
limes musical gimmicks are needed, 
depending on the commercial. Then, 
after the music is completed, and the 
agency agrees that its emotions are 
right, it goes off to be filmed and to 
have the voice track added. 

The completed pre-scored track 
( ould also be used to test out a com- 
mercial idea, since music costs are 
inherently lower than film costs. Film 
producers working with pre-scored 
tracks find that their job is greatly 
simplified, since from the moment 
the) start an assignment, they have 
a definite idea of how to handle it, 
as well as a specific schedule of the 
timings within the commercial. In 
addition to being able to come closer 
to the agency conception of what is 
to be filmed, it also regarded as 
possible, with experience, to achieve 
some savings in filming costs which 
ran be turned over to the client. 

Leigh was optimistic on the future 
of music in commercials. "Up to 
now. he said, "some commercials 
have glossed over music in a way 
they would never handle copy or film- 
in". Who ever heard of stock copy 
in a commercial, or a spot made en- 
tirely of stock footage? Yet many ex- 
pensive commercials up to now have 
used canned music. Usually the at- 
tempt has been half-hearted. Some- 
one asks whether there shouldn't be 
some music, and someone else says, 
'Yeah. Put some in.' The result is 
that music has been used as an orna- 
ment, or to fill up dead spaces. But 
it has never been part of the organic 
whole. Now, however, the picture is 
changing. 

Much confusion on music in tv 
commercials has resulted because of 

I false comparisons of live perform- 
ances with tv, Leigh stated. "You 
just can't come across with a 100- 
piece orchestra in a tv commercial; 

| it s often a foolish expense. Music for 



tv commercials must be designed to 
mix with other elements. Also, let's 
face it, some tv speakers are too small 
to do an adequate job. Music for tv 
must be electronic, and the composer 
must use electronic devices such as 
microphones and control panels al- 
most as though they were instruments 
themselves. Where an unusual effect 
is what's needed, music and electron- 
ics should be used to get it. But 
in any case, the music must be direct 
and simple. The tv commercials com- 
poser finds out what the client needs. 



With pre-scoring, you meet that need 
in the universal language of music. 
You go right to it and deliver it. It's 
direct and it's emotional. That's all 
there is to it." 

Pre-scoring appears to be gaining 
ground most rapidly in areas where 
it has never been used before. Ani- 
mated commercials are usually pre- 
scored, and squeeze-motion commer- 
cials, which use a process like anima- 
tion except that actual photographs 
are substituted for some drawings, al- 
most always use pre-scoring. ^ 



Ask f he r^an who cjefs 9ro ^ 

WDBJ is one of the 
best buys in 
television • . . 

anywhere! 




WDBJ -TV covers 53 coun- 
ties . . . where there are over 
400,000 television homes, 
$2 billion in retail sales. You 
can buy into this rich market 
economically and effectively, 
for WDBJ-TV furnishes highly 
rated shows at comparatively 
low cost to you. 

For example, THE EARLY 
SHOW, best features from 
MGM, WB, UA, etc., has an 



average daily rating of 14.7. 
It delivers viewers for only 95 
cents per M on a 5 Plan; 75 
cents per M on a 10 Plan.* 
Powerful sales-producing 
merchandising support 
provided, too! 

It will pay you to take a 
closer look at THE EARLY 
SHOW and other "best buys" 
offered by WDBJ-TV. 

•all cpm> bated on March, 1959 NSI 



ASK YOUR PGW COLONEL FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITIES 




Maximum Power 



CHANNEL 

Maximum Height 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



7 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



45 



things 



are 



blooming 




in the garden of EASTMAN 

A "grey fox" with a green thumb has set a new record in the broadcast industry. 

The "grey fox" is Bob Eastman who just one year ago this month opened his first office and 
announced that Robert E. Eastman & Co., Inc. was in. business. 

The record of growth since that time speaks for itself. It is unparalleled in the annals of the entire 
exciting industry of which he is and has been so vital a part. No other station representative has 
ever traveled so far so fast before. 

From an initial group of four radio stations, Eastman today represents 27, of which 21 are in the 
top 50 markets of America. From a modest four-man sales staff the company has grown to 18, with ! 
men presently in New York. The initial office has been expanded to six — New York, Chicago, 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Dallas and St. Louis. The original New York office has been enlarged tc 
house the twenty some people now needed to perform the functions of the day. 

The increase of national spot business Eastman has brought to his stations is equally impressive. 
Jack Sullivan of WNEW says, '"59 national spot figures are 20% ahead of last year". John Box, 
Executive V.P. of the Balaban Stations says, "Balaban Station's national spot volume up 187%". 
Duncan Mounsey of WPTR says, "Growth has been a phenomenal 77%". We could go on. 
Thei'e just isn't space. 

For whatever help advertising played in this growth we are naturally gratified. As a matter of 
truth nobody is ever more pleased with the success of a client than the agency involved. 

Happy Birthday to you Bob and to all your able, dedicated staff. We're pretty certain you'll beat 
your own record before you reach the age of two. 



jay victor & associates inc. 

advertising and public relations 



NEW YORK: 515 Madison Avenue, New York 22, N. Y.- Barclay 7-6474 
NEWARK: 1225 Raymond Boulevard, Newark 2, N. J.- Market 3-8487 




ALWAYS... 
a jump ahead 



The vibrant enthusiasm of 
staying a jump ahead of our 
contemporaries is a vital part 
of all personnel at KONO 
in San Antonio. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
listeners' ears keenly tuned 
to the times ... for first 
in news . . . finest in music. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
San Antonio's largest radio 
audience buying at fever pitch . . 
day after day. 

For remarkable facts about the 
"jump-ahead" KONO . . . see your 

KATZ AGENCY 

REPRESENTATIVE 

5000 Watts • 860 KC 




JACK ROTH, Mgr. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



48 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Norwich Pharmacal Co., Norwich, N. Y.: A new campaign i 
kicking off in top markets for Pepto-Bismol the third week in July 
for six weeks. Night minutes are being used, frequencies varying. 
Buyer: Allan Hornell. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 

General Foods Corp., Maxwell House Div., Hoboken, N. J.: Sched- 
ules in scattered markets start as soon as possible for Instant Max- 
well House, with night chainbreaks and I.D.'s. Buyers: Grace 
Porterfield, Brock Peterson. Agency: Benton & Bowles, New York. 

Duffy- Mott Co., Inc., New York: Going into top markets with 
Clapps Baby Food schedules of night minutes, to start the third week 
in July and run through the contract year. Buyer: Steve Suren. 
Agency: SSCB, New York. 

Ceneral Mills, Inc., Refrigerated Foods Div., Los Angeles: An in- 
troductory campaign is getting off for Refrigerated Bread Sticks in 
the top 25 markets. Day and late night 10-Plans are being used. 
Buyer: Hale Byers. Agency: Knox Reeves, Minneapolis. 

Quaker Oafs Co., Chicago: New schedules are being used again for 
Life cereal in its two test markets, Albany and Omaha, via J. Walter 
Thompson, Chicago. Markets have been used off and on for past six 
months. 

Corn Products Co., New York: A two-week schedule begins about 
mid-July in about 20 top markets to push NuSoft Fabric Softener; 
daytime and fringe night minutes are being scheluled. Buyer: Judy 
Bender. Agency : McCann-Erickson, New York. 

RADIO BUYS 

Armour & Co., Chicago: A new campaign begins the third week in 
July for Dash dog food, with Foote, Cone & Belding, Chicago, al- ( 
locating $75,000 for spot radio in 33 top markets. Five week sched- 
ules, daytime minutes, are being set. Buyer: Gwen Dargel. 

Mermen Co., Morristown, N. J.: Schedules are being initiated in 
about 30 markets for Skin Bracer, Spray and Stick deodorant. Foam 
Shave and Quinsana. Promotion starts third week of July for 14 
weeks; day minutes and I.D.'s. Buyer: Herb Gandel. Agency: 
Warwick & Legler, New York. 

C. P. H. Cigar Co., New York: Kicking off a campaign in major 
markets for El Producto. Traffic hour minutes are being scheduled, 
for a seven week run beginning third week in July. Frequencies 
vary. Buyer: Chiz Craster. Agency: Compton Adv., New York. 

Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., New York: Intensive sched- 
ules in the top 50 markets and many minor ones to begin soon as 
possible, warning public against dangerous secondary uses of plastic 
bags. Schedules of daytime minutes are for four weeks. Buyer: 
Red Ennis. Agency: BBDO, New York. 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



FOR INCOME 



Louisiana's second market in 
size is first in buying power. 
The $6,455 LBI per household 
in Baton Rouge is several 
lengths ahead of New Orleans 
and Shreveport. To sell 
Louisiana, buy advertising 
in at least two markets — 
the right two. Buy 2 
in Baton Rouge. 



NBiC ABC 



\m 
nil 

►::< 
►::< 

►::< 
M 



i 



7 



laref 





RICH 
BATON 
ROUGE 



• ■: SM S^ 
1959 



BATON ROUGE. LOUISIANA 



R tOOl FT POWER lOO OOO V 

REPRESENTED BY HOLLINGBERY 



BUYING INCOME 

(Metropolitan Area) 




$5796* 
Shreveport 


$5676* 

New 
Orleans 











With the new push for color tv, SPONSOR ASKS: 






Is your market ready for 




RCA is initiating a new promo- 
tion for color sets; network color 
programing will be increased. 
Here station men discuss color 
tv's potential in their markets 

Tom Chisman, president, WVEC-TV, 
Norfolk, Va. 

Color tv in the Norfolk market is 
in much the same position that a 
thing called "prosperity" was in back 
in the '30s — just around the corner. 

And like prosperity it's not going 



Wont be 
ready till all 
manufacturers 
get behind it 



to make that corner until the people 
directly involved in set manufacture 
and distribution get together and 
provide a workable program involv- 
ing all phases of color, programing, 
distribution, promotion, price, trans- 
mission, and so on. 

No one outfit can break the bar- 
rier of selling color tv to the public 
although RCA must be given a great 
deal of credit for trying. However, 
there are so many reasons for the 
lack of genuine acceptance on the 
part of the consumer that no single 
factor is to blame. 

A number of people have felt that 
price was the factor and it struck me 
as rather unusual that only last week 
at a big color conclave price was 
again and again brought into the 
picture as the major problem and 
that once the price was brought with- 
in "reasonable" limits the color tv 
project would be solved. 

I am inclined to disagree with this 
wholeheartedly. Today our entire 
economy is based on credit and it 
isn't any harder to purchase a color 
tv set on credit than it is to buy an 
automobile, refrigerator, air condi- 



tioner or any other appliance normal- 
ly found in the household. 

From where I sit here in the Nor- 
folk market, the only way color tv set 
sales can receive anything close to the 
impetus needed to make any impact 
on the consumer market is for a 
group of the set manufacturers, not 
just one. to get together and launch a 
cooperative color tv drive. If this 
were done in our market, where no 
one has pushed color tv at all for the 
past two years, something might be 
accomplished. If this manufacturers 
push were coordinated with a con- 
tinuing promotion campaign by deal- 
ers and distributors in Norfolk, dem- 
onstrating the quality and attractive 
characteristics of color tv I feel there 
would be no lack of customers. How- 
ever, none of the better dealers in 
Norfolk have made any attempt to 
push color tv and without that local 
enthusiasm no project for color will 
get off the ground. 

Another reason for the lack of 
color tv enthusiasm in Norfolk is the 
unfortunate transmission problems 
we have had. Until recently the cable 
from Washington, D. C. to Richmond 
was so bad that dealers, if they want- 
ed to, wouldn't take the chance of 
showing color sets with the type of re- 
ception received. 

Like the set manufacturers prob- 
lem, which finds only one company 
trying to put across color tv, the net- 
works are in a similar position. Only 
one network does any consistent color 
programing and unfortunately that is 
not enough to influence the customer 
to run out and buy a color set. 

I don't think that the trend to color 
tv will assume any proportions of im- 
portance until the manufacturers, the 
dealers and distributors and the net- 
works sit down together to work out 
a comprehensive all-out program cov- 
ering all phases of the problem and 
institute a sustained drive to put color 
tv in every home. 

Once they prove, through sufficient 
demonstration and continuing pro- 
motion, that color tv is here — now; 



that the programing is sufficient to 
warrant a new set in the home, and 
that the equipment is guaranteed to 
provide quality color without necessi- 
tating expensive adjustment contracts, 
the proponents of color tv will find 
that prosperity can turn that corner. 



Bill Putnam, president, WWLP, Chan- 
nel 22, Springfield, Mass. 

Our market here in Springfield, 
Mass., has been ready for color 'tv 
since it was first announced as being 
available. Our question is, is color 
ready for us? 

Ry this I mean, are the manufac- 
turing powers-that-be, going to get 
together and come up with a color tv 
set that will be in a reasonable price 
range for the average family. To date 
the major manufacturers have sat 
back like fat cats and waited for one 
manufacturer, RCA, to do the entire 
job of pioneering the color market. 
RCA has done a magnificent job, 
there's no question of that, but it's 
still too big a job for one company. 

Refore color can make that final 
breakthrough the other manufactur- 
ers are going to have to pitch in and 
help both in finding a properly priced 
set and in launching the national pro- 
motion and exploitation pitch that 
will be needed to move any impor- 
tant number of color tv sets. 




Springfield is 
ready, but set 
prices too high 



As far as preparation of our mar- 
ket for color tv, although the dealers 
and distributors (with of course the 
exception of the RCA people) have 
not given color any kind of a sendoff, 
the impact has been tremendous. 
Those who have color tv in the mar- 
ket are crazy about it and the word- 



50 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



Advertisement 



color tv? 



of-mouth publicity they give color is 
better than the little advertising color 
now gets. 

The reception of color in our area 
is, and I'll quote our chief engineer, 
George Townsend. "Fantastic." There 
is very little adjustment necessary 
and from research we have done, the 
uhf band which we are on provides 
a picture of better quality for color 
than any of the vhfs in this area. 

In my estimation the time is ripe 
for the push that will get color off the 
ground and again I refer to the price 
factor. Once the manufacturers come 
out with a reasonably priced set, the 
people who have been holding off on 
buying color will have no further rea- 
son to hold off and within a short 
time all the figures that General Sarn- 
off has been forecasting for some time 
will become actualities. 

There have been a lot of extremely 
amateurish diagnoses about color tv 
from people who don't know any- 
thing about color tv but who unfor- 
tunately give their "expert" opinions 
about it. based on problems "a friend 
of mine with a color set" had en- 
countered. Inasmuch as no one, par- 
ticularly the dealers, attempts to dis- 
pute these varied but inaccurate "ex- 
port" opinions, the general climate of 
color tv set sales is unhealthy and 
needs a solid uplift via heavy promo- 
tion and demonstration to prove that 
most of the problems in color, par- 
ticularly along reception and adjust- 
ment line, have been overcome. 

If effective methods of mass dem- 
onstration of color could be initiated 
and many of the potential customers' 
fears regarding color could be laid to 
rest, a real swing to color could be 
created. The color programing to- 
lay, although still not sufficient to be 
a major factor in breaking the price 
line, is good. And eventually any- 
thing good sells. It has already been 
demonstrated that color programing 
has a much higher viewership than 
black and white and this should be 
indicative of color's potential. 
(Please turn to page 73) 



ADAM YOUNG ASKS: 

Must public 
all follow one 
rigid pattern? 




Adam Young 



Lengthy public service discussions had their day 
when radio consisted entirely of fifteen, thirty, sixty 
minute programs. In that context, long periods of 
conversation and discussion had a place. 



Nowadays people listen differently. They're constantly on the move — now 
in one room, now in another, in the vard. on the road, on the beach. 

Many alert, modern broadcasters were quick to perceive that new ways of 
living would result in new ways of listening to radio. As a consequence, they 
developed a different kind of radio programming. Brevity is now the order 
of the day. The public needs, wants — and therefore is getting all its radio 
in programs of five minutes or less. 

Every musical selection, every newscast, every weather announcement, every 
family game, every vox pop feature is a program unto itself. So — in effect — 
is every commercial. 

How do these changes affect the techniques of public service programming? 
While inflexible operators continue to fill the air with deadening chatter that 
chases audience away, modern, unrigid broadcasters have creatively cast 
public service into short "programs," in tune with audience habits. Now. 
instead of infrequent, drawn-out, audience-dispelling discussions, a cause 
benefits from saturation-frequency announcements. The same creative and 
scheduling techniques which sell advertiser wares, also promote valid religi- 
ous, agricultural and educational ends. And more people are getting the 
message more often. 

Mention of "more people" brings us to another significant consideration. 
The size of a station's public service performance is inextricablv bound up 
with the size of its audience. The fact that more people choose to listen to 
a station indicates not only that the station serves well, but also that govern- 
ment, church, charity, schools, police and other agencies are assured of a 
"market ' for their vital messages. Which is better? 15 minutes of conver- 
sation on the eighth best station? Or 15 spots on the most popular station? 
It is not at all difficult to answer. 

Next time somebodv sheds doubt on a stations public sen ice effort, ask two 
questions: I 1 ) Is he a competitor, substituting a side issue for a main one? 
(2) What makes him think there is just one way to serve the public interest? 



ADAM YOUNG INC. 

Representing all that's most modern and efficient in today's radio 

NEW YORK (3 E. 54th St.) • ATLANTA • CHICAGO • DETROIT 
LOS ANGELES • ST. LOUIS • SAN FRANCISCO 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



51 



E TAI 



REI 



API 



rz\ 



\ZJ U L 



■1 



D 



Snip. Just like that We've cut through 
the maze of rate structures and policies 
in VTR-land. Crown Stations, first in 
the nation with videotape, have 
adopted this videotape policy: 

• No charge foi VTR playback 

• No VTP facilities charge for re- 
cording provided tape is used on 
a Crown Station. ( Live studio and 
rehearsal charges apply ) 

• Tape furnished free and held for 
14 days if used exclusively on 
Crown Stations. Otherwise standard 
tape charges apply. 

Period. Want more specifics? 
Ask the man from Blair-TV. 




The Crown Statiois 



OF THE PACIFIC NORTHS 
KING-TV • KGW-TV • KRE 



IS1 

"I". 



1 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



II JULY 1959 

Copyright l»M 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



The daytime broadcasters have lost again in their bid for longer operating 
hours, and this time the defeat appears to be very, very final. 

They still have one arrow in their bow: the Senate Foreign Relations Committee this 
week once again took up the NARBA and U.S. -Mexican treaties on use of frequencies, pacts 
which the daytimers have been able to block in the past. 

There is little evidence that the FCC looks with any kindness on the deadlock over these 
treaties, however. The Commission is very anxious to secure ratification, because as matters 
stand no nation could be condemned too strongly if it jumped another nation's frequency in 
this hemisphere. 

Commissioner Rosel Hyde negotiated the agreements, did everything he could to push 
claims of all U.S. interests, including the daytimers. He labored long and mightilv and had 
the approbation of all, again including the daytimers. Then the daytimers turned around and 
blocked his treaties in the Senate on the grounds they would foreclose longer daytimer hours 
on Mexican and Canadian channels. 

It showed an unusual display of power, and part of the reason the daytimers were able 
to swing it was most undoubtedly the long FCC delay in finally disposing of clear channel, 
daytime skywave and daytimer proceedings. 

The Commission has now finally decided to turn down the daytimers' compromise pro- 
posal for operation from 6 a.m. or sunrise, whichever is earlier, to 6 p.m. or sunset, which- 
ever is later. The first proposal would have been 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

All other radio stations, meanwhile, back the FCC most vigorously in pleading for 
Senate ratification of the treaties. 



The Senate Commerce Communications subcommittee once again stages a 
battle royal between competing methods of extending the range of tv stations. 

Involved are community antenna systems, boosters and small-town tv stations which want 
protection from any method of bringing in metropolitan tv programs. 

At issue are bills backed by the FCC to legalize the on-channel boosters plus one requir- 
ing CATV systems both to have the consent of the originating stations and to carry the local 
tv station if asked to do so. 

Another bill introduced by Sens. Frank E. Moss (D., Utah) and James Murray, (D., 
Mont.) would forbid CATV systems if they adversely affect local tv stations or the establish- 
ment of a local tv service. 

Sen. Gale McGee (D., Wyo.) summed up one side of the battle with the comment that 
one or two "super stations" could serve the entire nation by use of such devices to 
spread their signals. He asked if anybody could wish such a situation to come about. 

Sen. John Pastore (D., R.I.) summed up for the other side. He accused the small local 
stations of wishing protection from competition, cited the conflict between the desire of 
everybody to encourage local stations as against the fact that people are able to get a choice 
of programs by the devices in question. He added that once you give people tv. you will have 
a pretty hard time taking it away from them. 



PONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



53 



, 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercial 



FILM-SCOPE 



54 



NIELSEN 


ARB 


21.5 


15.7 


14.4 


10.4 


— 


27.2 


29.4 


11.6 


17.5 


16.0 


17.5 


15.0 


— 


34.3 


28.3 


— 


16.2 


— 


21.0 


— 


20.7 


17.6 


SPONSOR • 


11 JULY 1951 



II JULY 1959 Srhaefcr Beer (BBDO) will unify its syndication programing this fall with the 

cmriikt if» purchase of ITC's Four Just Men in five to nine Eastern markets. 

sponsor Lggj. season Schaefer used as many as three different syndicate shows. It plans, however 

publications inc. to cont } nue usmg i ate snow "special" features in the New York market. 

Four Just Men is ITC's first brand new syndication property since the company organ 
ized last fall. International names are starred in this British-produced series. 

Syndicated programs have an inherent advantage of up to 15% over networlt 
programs in viewing opportunities because of time-period differences and overlap 
coverage. 

In a CBS Films study of the East Coast area served by New York, Philadelphia, Nev 
Haven, Boston, Providence, Washington and Baltimore, almost 2 million out of 12.1 mil 
lion tv families can tune in on just two markets. 

This choice does not boost the audience potential of network shows where both market: 
are carrying shows at the same hour as much as syndicated shows can, because differen 
days of the week or different hours serve to double viewing opportunities. 

Two new large feature film packages have reportedly been quietly put into dis 
I ii I ml ion by film syndicators. 

Screen Gems is handling the Goldwyn features package and is understood to have ahead) 
approached CBS o&o's as likely buyers. 

UAA is also moving the RKO package of 700 features, although it has refrained frorr 
advertising the move. 

Syndication strategy in the past on "sleeper" sales used this doubly-effectivi 
weapon : The early buyer feels he is getting first crack at the properties, and then after t 
deal is made, the distributor can talk about pre-sold grosses when the property is announcec 

to the trade. 

^^ 

When Amoco switched from network to syndication this past season with U. S 
Border Patrol, it apparently also proved that a regional show with an "off season' 
spring start has no ratings disadvantage. 

Despite the mid-season premiere, CBS Films' U. S. Border Patrol via Joseph Katz earner 
an 18.1 Nielsen in 20 markets and a 17.0 ARB in 30. cities. 

These early ratings are further evidence that syndication is not tied to Septembei 
premieres and shows can do equally well with other starting dates. 

Here's how Nielsen and ARB rated the other-than-fall starters in 10 cities: 

MARKET STATION & TIME 

Albany-Schenectady WAST-TV, Fri., 7:30 p.m. 

Baltimore WJZ-TV, Sun., 9:30 p.m. 

Baton Rouge WBRZ-TV, Tues., 6:30 p.m. 

Boston WBZ-TV, Wed., 7:00 p.m. 

Charleston-Huntington WCHS-TV, Fri., 10:30 p.m. 

Cincinnati WCPO-TV, Fri., 10:30 p.m. 

Duluth-Superior KDAL-TV, Thurs., 7:30 p.m. 
Greensboro-Winston-Salem WFMY-TV, Thurs., 7:30 p.m. 

Providence WPRO-TV, Thurs., 7:00 p.m. 

Rochester WROC-TV, Mon., 7:00 pm. 
Ten-city average 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



CBS Films' Fred Mahlstedt takes exception to reports on practices of Japa- 
nese tv stations with U. S. film (FILM-SCOPE, 27 June). 

Says Mahlstedt: "Our experience in selling to Japanese stations and networks is that they 
are completely honest and husinesslike in their dealings with us and that prints are returned 
as quickly as from any other foreign country." 

Adds Mahlstedt: "We have a representative, Sekiya & Co., Inc., in Japan who monitors 
station programing constantly and to the best of our knowledge, no indication of unauthor- 
ized programing use has ever come to their attention." 

Incidentally, the reason for low prices on U. S. films, explains Mahlstedt, is the limited 
import quota set by the Japanese government. 

There's little chance in the immediate future of syndicators banding into a 
trade association for the specific purposes of promoting the use of syndication and 
developing research that would help sell syndication. 

Even though several film firms have showed interest in such a suggestion made a month 
ago by Leslie Dunier. of Mogul. Lewis, Williams & Savior, no overt moves to bring the trade 
together for a discussion has been in evidence. 

Syndicators admit they're disturbed by the spot tv melon that is increasingly being divid- 
ed up in favor of spot announcement at the expense of film programs, but their lack of interest 
in a trade association stems from these two dilemmas: 

1) That non-participating companies would gain from the joint research activities. 

2) With two of the syndication companies controlled by networks, these two subsidi- 
aries would have the embarrassment of pitching against their own o&o spot salesmen. 

COMMERCIALS 

Pre-scoring in commercials has become an important creative vogue over the 
past few months. 

While pre-scoring has long been standard practice in animations, the technique 
of making the music first and the visuals later has found new applications to solve 
commercials problems formerly considered impossible to handle. 

Pre-scoring has proved especially valuable in live-action stylized commercials. 
in squeeze-motion, and in handling a long series of product shots. 

However, pre-scoring has had less outstanding results for demonstration commer- 
cials or spots than depend on a complex visual approach, but new uses for the techniques are 
foreseen for the 1959-60 season. 

For details, see page 40. this issue. 

Automotive advertisers this season continue to explore the unusual opportu- 
nities of location production overseas. 

Chevrolet made a 2 1 /o-minute spot in Paris which featured a driverless convertible mak- 
ing a tour of that citv. 

Arco Film, the producer, used remote radio controls, and was able to divert traffic up to 
half an hour from key sites. 

The commercial won first prize in its category at the Cannes festival. 

Horace Schwerin, speaking in London last month, pointed to three common 
errors which miss the vital promise in a commercial. 

They are: (1) Neglecting the brand and just selling the product. (2) Criticizing the 
competition instead of selling your brand, and (3) Praising the brand while forgetting the 
consumer. 

Responses by 1 1. S., Canadian and British viewers were described as basically alike in 
motivation, fluctuating least with logical commercials and most with mood commercials. 

PONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 55 



A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



JULY 1959 Madison Avenue gossip this week is concentrating on this item: That General Foods 

omriibt its. is mulling a gw j tc h f or Sanka from Y&R. 

The brand has been with that agency since its innovation. 



SPONSOR 
PUBLICATIONS IMC. 






Agencies are finding that the cost of a name entertainer to handle commer- 
cials only on an exclusive basis can be almost as high as though he were engaged 
for a program series. 

Take Edgar Bergen, for instance. His price for linking himself to a single product 
in the form of commercials is $7,000 per week for a minimum of 52 weeks. 

Local radio continues to strain to provide listeners with all sorts of gimmick 
contests. 

Variations of the hideaway charade and tune guessing contests continue to flower. 
Meantime this type of prize participation is getting a big play: mystery characters circu- 
late in public places, palpitating to be identified. 

Have you ever wondered how an agency goes about selecting summer re-runs 
from the film series carried on the network during the regular season? 

sponsor made a spot check and found that the choice is left pretty much to the tv 
supervisor assigned to the account. His list, as a rule, is automatically approved by the 
head of the tv department. 

You've been around the business at least 20 years if you can remember when: 

• P&G's total air time budget was around $6 million — and this included spot. 

• General Mills sponsored local ball games in 78 markets to plug Wheaties. 

• Leo Burnett's No. 1 air account was Pure Oil ($300,000). 

• All of radio's time billings added up to $120 million gross. 

• NBC advertised itself as the "World's Greatest Broadcasting System." 

• Jack Benny pushed the Chase & Sanborn Hour out of first place. 

• Ma Perkins wrested the soapers' leadership away from Guiding Light. 

• The number of radio stations came to 774 (today it's around 3,900) . 

• Calendar note: All the above happened in 1939. 

Do you know why Chicago agency people are kept ever so much more conscio 
of radio than their brethren in New York? 

Chalk this down as one pretty good reason: In Chicago, matching golf scores and thi 
like is passed up by reps for the more fascinating and educational pastime of quot 
ing parables about misadventures in radio thinking. 

To cite a couple: 

"Today both buyers and sellers of radio are trying to climb over mole hills 
instead of mountains." 

"It's too bad that people dealing with radio don't realize that they can soar like eagles, 
rather than flap around like barnyard hens." 

56 SPONSOR • 11 JULY 195$ 




\in the public interest..." 



Community service is a most important facet of a radio station. That's why, in addition to strong public 
service programming and vigorous support of civic activities. KNX stages a continuing series oJ events in 
its Columbia Square home. The most striking of these displays is the KNX Armed Forces Week each May. 
This year 75,000 Southern Californians saw the latest in space age weapons and probes. No less significant, 
was our Youth Science Fair featuring the exhibits of outstanding high school students selected from over 
200 Los Angeles County high schools. Last year during the Christmas season, choral groups from all over 
the Southland came to sing for highly appreciative KNX listeners. A man is known by the company he keep-. 
So is an advertiser. That's why it pays to keep company with KNX Radio ... Southern California's ~1 radio 
-tation for community service. 



Represented by CBS Radio Spot Sales 






WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 





TRAFFIC REPORTS earn awards for WPEN, 
Phi la., co-sponsors DeSo+o, Sun Oil. Shown 
(t-r): Gene Freed, DeSoto; T. S. Dulce, Safety 
Council; Joe Morrison, s+a., traffic reptr.; Sun 
Oil's T. S. Horriclcs; M. Arnold, sta. mgr. 



SITTING ON TOP of the world is WAKE, 
Atlanta's hit parader, Bob McKee, who took 
to the air in Foremost Dairies' giant balloon 
— largest in the world — to deliver broadcast 
30 above the Broadview shopping center 



WATT A PARADE! Celebrating it's increase to 1,000 watts of power, WZIP, Cinn., sends a 
huge float through the downtown area. Sharing limelight with models is Don McCarty, anncr. 





WATCH OUT! To plug Sane and Sa; 
Fourth campaign, WBZ-TV, Boston, hoi 
ed sedan 50', let it drop to cement blol 
to simulate head-on crash via live pick { 



BARED BACKS are tan in Texas ft 

lowing recent suntan contest staged 
KIXZ, Amarillo. Winner is shown he 
with Dennis James, station's program 




SPONSOR • M JULY ] { ->5 ( 



DOD OLD SUMMERTIME was musical back- 
ound for Gay Nineties party staged in Los 
lgeles by Stromberger, LaVene, McKenzie for over 
media reps. Usual "free lunch" went with brew 




OWAAAH! Led by 1908 Pierce Arrow, 
1909 Ford, 96 cars get underway in Fifth 
Annual Antique Auto Tour. Two-day, 150- 
mile excursion was given special coverage 
by WOOD, WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids 



APPY ANNIVERSARY TO YOU! was the serenade of hundreds of "emulsified dirts" to Lestoil's Jacob Barowsky, president of Adel 
hemical Co. Special film was produced by Robert Lawrence Animation, New York to mark occasion of Adell's 25th anniversary celebration 



ponm.k 



11 july 1959 



59 




7-COUNTY PULSE REPORT 

KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK AREA — MARCH 1958 
SHARE OF AUDIENCE — MONDAY-FRIDAY 


6 A.M.- 12 NOON 
12 NOON -6 P.M. 
6 P.M.- 12 MIDNIGHT 


WKZO 


Station "B" 


Station "C" 


32 
29 
30 


22 
22 
20 


10 
10 
11 



BUT... WKZO Radio Makes You Feel Like A Ruler 

In Kalamazoo - Battle Creek And Greater Western Michigar 



WKZO Radio rules more listeners than any other radio ; 
station in the big Kalamazoo-Battle Creek and Great 
Western Michigan market. On WKZO Radio you get 
an audience 43% larger than that of the next station! 

Pulse proves that WKZO Radio holds an astounding 
margin over other stations with leadership (6 a.m. -12 
midnight, Monday through Friday) in all 360 
quarter hours. 

Add WKZO Radio to your sales staff in Kalamazoo- 
Grand Rapids and Greater Western Michigan. See you 
Averv-Knodel man for more information! 



, 



jfiLouis XIV became King of France in 1643 at age 5 and reigned for n 
years until 1715. 



t*' 



TV-. 



:?f 



WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIOS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WWTV — CADILLAC, MICHIGAN 
KOLN TV — UN ^ LN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 
WMBD-TV — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



WKZO 

CBS RADIO FOR KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
AND GREATER WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



60 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 19- 



ADVERTISERS 



NBC TV last week previewed its 
latest study in customer accelera- 
tions before a gathering of ahout 
200 auto admen in Detroit. 

The latest factors dealt with slo- 
gan identification and new-car opin- 
ion, the self-image of a car prospect 
in terms of what he looks for and 
what buyers' opinions are on small 
and foreign cars vs. the standard 
line. 

Here's the latest (1959) compari- 
son of buyers-shoppers-dealers' 
shares of preferences in media, 
plus actual shares of expenditures, 
as noted in the survey: 

MEDIUM PREFERENCES EXPENDITURES 

T\ 60$ 35% 

Magazines 1<">', 25% 



Newspapers 22 ( 



40% 



The Wander Co. has different tv 
plans for Ovaltine come the fall. 

For children appeal the money will 
go entirely to network moppet-time 
programs. 

It will continue with spot for adult 
targeting via dav and night minutes. 



Tatham-Laird is firming up the 
buys. 

Campaigns: 

• The Squirt Company, Sher- 
man Oaks, Calif., has prepared a se- 
ries of tv spot announcements which 
are currenth being made available 
to participating franchise holders. 
The announcements are of 10-second. 
20-second and 60-second duration and 
feature a combination of live-action 
on film and animated jingles. The 
agency: Honig-Cooper, Harrington 
& Miner. 

• Knickerbocker beer will spend 
about $100,000 on a summer spot ra- 
dio campaign in the New York met- 
ropolitan area. Funds for the cam- 
paign have come from the brand's tv 
budget. The announcements, to be 
carried by WABC, WINS, WMCA. 
WNFW and WOR. will run at the 
rate of 85 per week ( mosth minutes I . 
seven days a week, from 6 a.m. -6 p.m. 
Most of the spots are scheduled with- 
in news and personality d.j. shows. 
Via radio Knickerbocker aims to 
reach vacationers and listeners trav- 
eling in autos. The agency: Comp- 
ton Advertising, Inc. 



• Fizzies, Warner-Lambert's in- 
stant effervescent drink tablet, has 
boosted t\ expenditures backed In a 
new merchandising display as pari of 
an intensive, eight-week, "hot weath- 
er" campaign. Spot l\ expenditures 
in 175 marketing areas will be dou- 
bled, with the spots appearing large- 
l\ on children's programs. The agen- 
cy : Farlej Manning Associates, New 
York. 

Promotions: 

• Serta mattress, inaugurated a 
"Christmas in July' campaign via 
helicopter in Providence, R. I., last 
week. Accompanied b\ a local Serta 
representative, WICE personality. 
Jim Hines, decked out a~ Santa Claus, 
flew a route chartered b\ local deal- 
er store location. He hovered above 
each store and broadcast a salute to 
the particular dealer below. The 
agency: Arnold & Co.. Boston. 

• National Carbon Co., divi- 
sion of Union Carbide, makers of 
Eveready radio batteries, as the high- 
light of its 6th annual Portable Radio 
Month promotion, selected Fern 
Troutvine. WPFB, Middletown, Ohio. 
ps the outstanding woman broadcast- 



YOU CAN SELL 

ANYTHING 

SUCCESSFULLY 

0NWBC 

RADIO 



MPORTANT TO ADVERTISERS . . . NATIONAL AND LOCAL: 



i i. 



t isn't every medium that can point to proof of its sales effectiveness. On the 
? ollowing pages you will find positive proof of the selling power of WBC Radio 
stations for a wide variety of products. Many of these success stories come from 
ocal advertisers— men who are closest to moving goods on the local level . . . and who 
phoose WBC radio because they know it reaches more people at less cost than i 
other medium. I Broadcasting is basic. Basic regardless of whether you're sell: 
1 'ocal or nationally distributed products. WBC is proving it with results like these 
'very day. That's why no selling campaign is complete without the WBC stations. 



er of the year. More than 2,000 sta- 
tions across the country were polled 
for their nominations for the award. 
The agency: William Esty. 

Merging: Orr Industries, Opelika, 
Ala., with the Ampex Corp., Red- 
wood City, Calif. In essence, Orr be- 
comes a division of Ampex, and will 
continue to operate under its own 
name, in Opelika. with its present fa- 
cilities and personnel. 



AGENCIES 



George Gribbin, Y&R president, 
needled the advertising industry 
for not keeping pace with the 
progress of products it promotes. 

Speaking before the annual con- 
vention of the Advertising Associa- 
tion of the West. Gibbin posed these 
rhetorical questions to advertising 
agencies: 

• Is the agency working closely 
with its clients' research and devel- 
opment groups? 

• Is the agency planning and do- 
ing the kind of research that will 



help advertising keep pace with 
the upcoming changes of the scientific 
revolution? 

• Is the agency becoming "adven- 
turesome and revolutionary in its cre- 
ative activities?" 

He also called for agencies to get 
involved with products that may 
never get off the drawing board, and 
called on advertisers to bring the 
agency in on product development. 

"Above all," Gribbin concluded, 
"we should share our research. 
Medicine has made great strides be- 
cause discoveries have been shared. 
Advertising research has been held 
back because discoveries have been 
hoarded." 

Agency appointments: Stephan 
Distributing Corp., maker of Ste- 
phan's hair lotion, billing $1,000,000, 
from Cunningham & Walsh, to Peter 
Finney Co., Miami . . . Chiquita's 
lOO'/r Pure Canned Mashed Bananas 
to Young & Rubicam . . . Fabri- 
con. to Rossi & Co., Detroit. 



Publication note: TV Advertising 

(Harper), by Arthur Bellaire (BB- 



DO) , an authoritative guide and prac- 
tical handbook on the subject, hits 
the bookstores 22 July. 

Personnel moves: William D. 
Fisher, radio and television program 
director, Gardner Advertising Co., 
St. Louis . . . Raymond F. Marcus, 
account supervisor on Helena Rubin- 
stein, Ogilvy, B. & M. . . . Paul L. 
Field, tv producer, Benton & Bowles 
. . . Charles K. Ramond, technical 
director, ARF . . . David H. Pol- 
inger, account executive, Lewis & 
Polinger, Birmingham, Ala. . . . Bar- 
bara Lappin Pearl, media director, 
Nides, Cini, Adv., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Thev became v.p.'s: Edwin L. Leet, 
EWR&R, W. S. Walker Div., Pitts- 
burgh. Pa. . . . Roscoe W. Sturges, 
Jr., Y&R . . . William P. Overend, 

Grey ... At JWT, Chicago: G. Mat- 



negro radio for 
metro new york 




FUDGE BY THE TON 

'WBZ helped us expand our 

operation . . . noiv helps us 

sell more than a ton 

of fudge a week!" 

GALO PUTNAM EMERSON 

Putnam Pantry Candies 

Danvers, Mass. 



CAME THE DELUGE 

"Your solicitation for distributors 

brought a profitable deluge of 

'phone and written response. It also set 

our people afire with new enthusiasm!" 

BILL CAVANAUGH, President, Bonus Living Opportunity 
— Nutrilite Food Supplement (Distributor-recruiting campaign) 



200 HAPPY BRIDES 

"Overwhelmed by response from i 
In one day received close to ' 
two hundred letters from brid 
all over New England!" 

BETTY GOODMAN 

Tribune Publishing Company 

(for "Bride Prefers Promotion") I 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE fes <c STATIC 



thews Baxter; Paul Lehner; Thomas 
J. O'Connell, and John L. Van Sant. 



ASSOCIATIONS 



Here are some of the latest NAB 
developments : 

• The tv board approved a great- 
l\ expanded tv information pro- 
gram to be policied by a special 
committee, composed of network and 
sponsor representatives. 

• The radio board adopted a reso- 
lution praising the work done by the 
Ml Industry Radio Music License 
Committee, which has just obtained a 
favorable eontraet from ASCAP. 

• The board of directors urged 
, support for legislation which would 

elear up the "equal time" snarl. 

Convention notes: the 4A Western 
Region convention will be held 18-21 
October, at the Santa Barbara Bilt- 
more and Miramar hotels in Santa 
Barbara, Calif . . . Robert SarnofT will 
keynote the fourth annual BPA con- 
vention in Philadelphia, 2-4 Novem- 
ber. 



This 4 n' data: The 4A*s has issued 
its 1959 "Roster and Organization," 
listing 339 member agencies . . . 
Social note: The RTES will hold its 
first annual "Fun Day Outing," 
Thursday, 30 July, at Pelham Coun- 
try Club, N. Y. 

Kudo : The veterans of Foreign 
Wars' Americanism award to the Con- 
necticut Broadcasters Association, for 
its sponsorship of the Voice of De- 
mocracy contest. 

Personnelities: Robert Light, 

formerly managing director, elected 
president, Southern California Broad- 
casters Association . . . Harwood 
Hill, executive v.p. of Publicidal 
Badillo. Inc., San Juan, elected presi- 
dent, Advertising Agency Association 
of Puerto Rico. 

They were elected officers: Rhode 
Island Broadcasters Association: 
president, Milton Mitler, WADK, 
Newport; v.p.. Edward Boghosian, 
WJAR-TV, Providence and secretary- 
treasurer. Zel Levin, WWON, Woon- 
socket . . . Adcraft Club of Detroit : 
president, Wendell Moore, director 
of advertising. Dodge division. Chrys- 



ler Corp.; first v.p., John Pingel, 
v.p., Brooke, Smith, French & Dor- 
rance; second v.p., Toby David, 
CKLW, Detroit, radio and tv per- 
sonality ; secretary to the board, 
John Bowers, manager, Ford car 
advertising division, and treasurer, 
Robert McKown, presidential assis- 
tant, D. P. Brother & Co. 



FILM 



Expansion was the keynote of 
three tv film company moves re- 
vealed last week. 

They were: 

• 20th Century Fox, in setting 
up an international tv wing under 
managing director Alan Silverbach 
to distribute 20th and other product 
abroad and also to handle foreign tv 
productions here. 

• Filmways, which is construct- 
ing one of the largest tape and film 
studios in the east, and which added 
an additional space for its headquar- 
ters. 

• Columbia Pictures, following 
its buy-out of Briskin Productions, 



NIW HAMPSHIRE 




IT'S THE BERRIES 

/<> independent and chain-store 
snrmarkets, sales doubled and even 
tripled in the period of our 
<.te spot commercials on WBZ." 

N 'IONAL CRANBERRY ASSOCIATION 
)cean Spray Cranberry Juice Cocktail) 



HOMES! HOMES! ALL SOLD OUT! 

"We had signed for two sets 

of week-end commercials— 

but were sold out after 

the first week-end." 

ROBERTS HOMES. INC. 
Chelmsford. Mass. 



TRAFFIC STOPPER DeSUZE 

"Congratulations to WDZ's DcSnze! 

About 20,000 cars stopped orcr 

the three-day holiday to get the autumn 

tourist kit you alone announced." 

JOHN BRENNAN, New Hampshire State 
Planning and Development Commission 



WBZ Boston 



REPRESENTED BY AM RADIO SALES. INC. 



appointed Irving Briskin West Coast 
administrative v. p. of Screen Gems. 

Sales : ABC Films reports The Peo- 
ple s Choice sold for stripping to 
\\ CBS-TV, New York and Kl TV, 
Los Angeles . . . Arrow Productions, 
the re-run division of 1TC, reports a 
0-month volume rise of 21% over 
last year; properties include Susie, 
Sgt. Preston and 9 others . . . Sta- 
tions huying CNP's Boots and Sad- 
dles — the Story of the Fifth Cavalry 
include WVEC-TV, Norfolk; WBRC- 
TV, Birmingham; KPTV, Portland, 
Ore.; KTVO, Ottumwa; WSOC-TV, 
Charlotte; WSJS-TV, Winston-Salem; 
WDBJ-TV, Roanoke; WTVY, Doth- 
an; WTVJ, Miami; and KTNT-TV, 
Seattle . . . Governor Television has 
sold Bucky & Pepito color cartoons 
to WNTA-TV, New York; WGN-TV, 
Chicago and KCOP, Los Angeles. 

International: Mickey Mouse Club 
will be the second Walt Disney pro- 
duction to be offered to Japanese 
viewers, according to Hakuhodo 
Advertising of Tokyo. It will be 
carried on the NTV under the spon- 



sorship of Ajinomoto. a flavoring. 
The Disneyland series is already car- 
ried on the Nippon Television Net- 
work under the sponsorship of Mit- 
subishi Electric Co., a major manu- 
facturer of appliances and electric 
apparatus. Disneyland, incidentally, 
is one of four American programs 
rated recently among the top-ten in 
Japan; the others are Superman, 
Lone Ranger and Lassie. 

Programs: Show Corporation of 
America has added four additional 
feature film titles to its Mid- '50 Mov- 
ies package; 14 of the 18 films in the 
package were released to theaters 
after 1955. 

Promotion: Eddy Arnold, co-star 
along with Jimmy Dean and Tennes- 
see Ernie Ford of Bernard L. Schu- 
bert's Your Musical Jamboree series, 
will make a series of personal appear- 
ances starting in about a month to 
more than 25 cities. 

Commercials: W. B. Doner Ad- 
vertising of Chicago reports excel- 
lent results using "soft sell" for an 
automotive client. Z. Frank, a Chi- 



cago Chevrolet dealer. The one-min- I 
ute commercial in color animation ! 
dropped all conversation but used ! 
music; it was produced by La 
Comete-Andre Sarrut and won sec- 
ond prize in its category at Cannes 
. . . UPA will make 11 commercials 
for Gillette to be used during the 
World Series this year . . . Play- 
house Pictures reports winning 
four awards for animation at the 
meetings of the Advertising Associa- 
tion of the West; the AAW award? 
were as follows: for 20-second ani- 
mation, First Place to Ford Dealers' 
spot via J. Walter Thompson, Los An- 
geles; Second Place to M. J. B. Cof- 
fee, through BBDO, San Francisco: 
and Third Place to Langendorf 
Bread, Young & Rubicam, San Fran- 
cisco; BBDO of San Francisco was 
also the agency on an ID award to t 
Burgermeister Beer. 



INTERNATIONAL 



Ted Bates is the latest agency to 
extend its operation to London 
via an operating agreement. 



•" 



. 





19500 



ROTTEN WEATHER— BRIGHT SALES 

"Thank you, KDKA, for one of our most 

successful promotions ever on our 

homes! Even with bad weather, you brought 

'em out . . . and they bought." 

J. F. ARMBRUSTER 
Smith & Armbruster 




48 Afe^ 



>\ 



GREAT SHAKES 

"We averaged 150 qualified leads 

a week from KDKA— and 

con verted three out of every five 

into actual sales." 

NIAGARA CYCLO MASSAGE 



VACATIONERS HALF-PRICE 

"The Ontario vacation booklet 
was offered on 37 stations. 
Average cost per inquiry: 
$1.32 . . . cost on KDKA: 63 cents: 

F. H. HAYHURST CO. LIMITED, For Or no 
Government, Department of Travel and PuHti 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE ®|g)@ STATlfl 



The joint operation will be under 
^e name of Hobson, Bates and Part- 
us, with John \Y. Hobson. who also 
[comes a member ol the Ted Bates 
hard, as the No. I man. 



\t> million viewers throughout 
Jirope recently witnessed special 
rograms commemorating the 

th anniversary of the Euro- 

sion network. 

The programs featured celebrities 
;d outdoor action scenes in each of 
participating countries. 

I he Kurovision network, which in- 
(ldes all the major countries of Eu- 
i'pe except Spain, is supervised by a 
phnical coordination centre in Brus- 
•ls. The language harriers, which 

isl between seven of the twelve 
iuntries, are surmounted by means 
i multiple commentators. 

lesearch note: A. C. Nielsen, 
1 (1., and the Attwood Group of 
l>mpanies, Ltd., have combined 
teir broadcast audience research in- 
t, a new company rendering a single 
rvice covering Great Britain and 
■land. Germany. France, Italy, Hol- 



land. Belgium, Luxembourg. Switzer- 
land and Austria. 



Agency appointment: Pan Ideal 
bakery, to Kenyon & Eckhardt 
de Mexico. 

New offices in Puerto Rico: Rob- 
ert Otto, its fifth branch office 
abroad, with Oscar Reinosa as execu- 
tive v.p. and mgr. ... El Mundo, 

new telecasting and broadcasting fa- 
cilities for WKAQ-TV-AM. 

Personnel appointments: Alastair 
Murray MacKenzie, director of 
Latin American Operations, and 
Thomas S. O'Brien, director of 
Far Eastern Operations, NBC Inter- 
national, Ltd. . . . Trevor G. Good- 
man, managing director, Y&R, Can- 
ada . . . Michael Hicks, managing 
director. BBDO, Canada . . . Don 
Cunningham, managing director, 
FC&B, Frankfurt. Germany . . . Dean 
Buchanan, news director, and 
Frank Warren, general manager 
and member of the board of direc- 
tors. Hawaiian Broadcasting System. 
Ltd., Honolulu. 



NETWORKS 



As might have been expected. 
ARB's first published report for 

Alaska shows that seven out of 
the top 10 favorite tv shows are 
westerns. 

In the States for the same period 
AHBs count had it four westerns out 
of the top 10. 

The shows they liked most in \n- 
chorage were in this order: Wagon 
Train; Gunsmoke; Have Gun, Will 
Travel: Rifleman; Wanted Dead or 
Alive; Red Shell on; Zone Grey; 
Huckleberry Hound: Markham. and 
Ran hide. 

The boil and bubble has subsid- 
ed at Mutual — at least for the 
moment — after a tempestuous 
week of filing a petition of bank- 



negro radio for 
metro new york 




UP TO 300% GREATER RETURNS! 

"We tried oar 50c offer 
i Pittsburgh stations. KDKA gave 
us the best cost 

per return . . . up to 300'/, better!" 

JACK W. BRADFUTE 
r,i'd, Rediield & Johnstone, Inc. for Ehlers Coffee 



MOVING LIKE CRAZY 

"Thanks, KDKA, for excellent 

sales results. We moved 

cvoi more Imperials and Chryslers 

than we had anticipated." 

DON C. CRANE 

Stoffnn Motors, Inc. 



KDKA Pittsburgh 

I REPRESENTED BY AM RADIO SALES, I NV ^^^^V 



ruptcy, changing ownership and 
taking on a new president (Rob- 
ert H. Hurleigh). 

Meanwhile efforts are being made 
to work out a settlement of the $3 
million owed by Mutual to 750 credi- 
tors. The biggest debt is that due 
the AT&T for long lines ($508,000). 

Network fall tv sales: North 
American Van Lines (Biddle Co., 
Bloomington, 111.) for 13 alternate 
weeks of Championship Bridge with 
Charles Goren, beginning Sun. 18 
Oct. on ABC TV, 3:30-4 p.m. 

Network radio sales and renew- 
als: Cadillac (MacManus. John & 
Adams) , for John Daly — Neivs, Mon.- 
Fri., 6:30-6:40 p.m., and Radio 
Bible Class, Inc. (J. M. Camp & 
Co.), 62 weeks, effective 28 June, for 
Rc.dio Bible Class, Sun., 8-8:30 a.m. 
. . . ABC sales: Grosset & Dun- 
lap ( Friend-Reiss Advertising). 
Landers, Frary & Clark (Goold & 
Tierney), and Rock of Ages (Har- 
old Cabot & Co.). for segments of 
The Breakfast Club, Mon.-Fri., 9-10 
a.m.; AFL-CIO (Furnam, Feiner & 
Co.). and Benrus Watch for week- 



end news broadcasts; A. E. Staley 
( EW.R&R), for weekday news broad- 
casts, and AT&T, Long Lines de- 
partment (N. W. Aver & Son), vari- 
out news broadcasts . . . Business at 
Mutual: Pinspotter division of 
AMF (Cunningham & Walsh), for 13 
weeks of Bill Stern Morning Sports- 
casts; AT&T (N. W. Ayer & Son, 
Philadelphia) for a series of adja- 
cencies after nighttime and Sunday 
newscasts; Wings of Healing (Cen- 
tury Advertising, Portland, Ore.), re- 
newed for its Sun. a.m. ^-hour se- 
ries . . . More clients for Mutual : 
American Red Ball Transit I Ru- 
ben Advertising), and Christmas 
Club (Brooke. French, Smith & Dor- 
rance, New York). 

On the Fall Specials front: Rex- 
all iBBDO). for six Sun. evenings, 
starting 18 Oct. 

New affiliates: WTTM, Trenton, 
from NBC Radio, goes Mutual 10 
August . . . KFIR, North Bend, Ore., 
rejoined, and WGPA, Bethlehem, 
Pa., joined with CBS, 5 July. 

Personnel appointments: Robert 



F. Hurleigh elected president ancj 
Albert Gregory McCarthy, HI 

secretary-treasurer at Mutual . . 
Stephan Meyer, director of pro 
gram services, NBC participating pro 
grams. 



RADIO STATIONS 



ASCAP estimates that its revenu« 
from radio stations under th< 
new five-year contract will droj 
between $800,000-$l million i 
year, but it will still take in $1( 
million annually from that me 
dium. 

The new licensing arrangement 
whose details are yet to be irone( 
out, includes these provisions: 

1) A decrease in the commercia 
percentage on net billings from 1 ] j ' , 
to 1%%. 

2 I Monthly sustaining fees are ti 
be $1 for stations billing less thai 
$50,000; twice the one-minute rat 
for stations between $50,000 an< 
$150,000 and 2M> times the minut 
rate for stations over $150,000. 

The Society has made the sam 
term available for the stations tha 



i 



DURKEE'S 



InAtwC 

MINCED 
ONION 



Greatest Success Story Ever To 



l: 



: 




tU TNI COO© 

Rwd* to IHe 


- No Petting • He Tors 





429.95 



1 



HUMBLE ONION NOW THE RAGE! 

"Our Instant 
Minced Onion is on 
KYW and having 
fabulous success." 

F. J. DANIELS 
Durkee Famous Foods 



"WE SOLD MORE RANGES IN ONE DAY THAN IN THE ENTIRE PREVIOUS YEAR 

biggest single day in our H years in business! 

All 5,212 adults who came credited KYW radio advertising as the reason. 

We don't believe any other media could have produced such 

a large crowd. I recommend KYW to all advertisers who leant results." 

W. L. RIEDLING 
Caloric Appliance Corporation 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE 



STATU 



extended their contracts while the 
negotiations were on. 

KBIG, Catalina, Calif., launched a 
new program format last week, fea- 
turing individualized hour and half- 
hour popular music segments. As part 
of the revamping: 

• KBIG special news features have 
Ibeen shifted to the hour and half- 
hour. 

• Each show has been given a 
descriptive title and a distinctive 
theme. 

Alfred J. McCosker, pioneering 
programer, got a special air trib- 
ute from WOR, N.Y., which he 
served as president and board 
chairman for many years. 

McCosker died 1 July at the age of 
72. 

Known in the medium during the 
fledging stage as "Hollywood" Mc- 
Cosker for his prolific use of film 
stars before the mike. McClosker also 
.became famed for the early develop- 
ment of symphonic broadcasts, news 
programing and variety^ shows. 

Radio and tv properties in three 



states have been formally merged 
into the Taft Broadcasting Co. 

The merger, effected by directors 
of Radio Cincinnati, one of the prop- 
erties absorbed, was to simplify the 
corporate structure and facilitate a 
public issuance of the new company's 
stock. 

Properties involved: Radio Cincin- 
nati; Radio Columbus; WTVN, Co- 
lumbus; WBRC, Birmingham, and 
WKYT, Lexington, Ky. 

Officers of the new company : presi- 
dent, Hulbert Taft, Jr.; executive 
v.p., David Taft; v.p.s, Ken Church 
and William Hansher; treasurer. 
Dorothy Murphy, and secretary. 
Robert Taft, Jr. 

A new study from RAB shows 
that marketers of sun tan lotions 
rely heavily on radio, using both 
spot and network, with heavy fre- 
quency from Friday evening through 
Sunday afternoon. 

The reason for favoring radio, ac- 
cording to RAB: to reach people on 
the way to weekend resorts, and peo- 
ple out-of-doors in the sun. 

• Ken Ellis, news editor of 



WMINI, Columbus, 0., developed 

quite a thing out of selling lu\ur\ 
trailers via remotes by teaming ii|> 
with his wife — just a housewife — to 
give the women's angle about mo- 
bile homes. 

Ideas at work : 

• Don't scare the customers: 
William H. Coy of Detroit, sug- 
gests that radio and tv weathercasters 
refrain from painting a bleak picture 
of the weather, and thereby avoid dis- 
couraging potential shoppers and 
others from going out to large shop- 
ping centers and downtown areas of 
trade. 

• "Salute to Merchants"" 1 pro- 
motion: KJXZ is calling up merch- 
ants in the Amarillo area to find out 
if they are listening to the station. 
Those tuned in are given the title of 
"KIXZ Listening Post" and they are 
saluted as such on the air. 



negro radio for 
metro new york 




WOW! 

We attracted 300 new 
customers in one 
k, increased sales 30' , 
... thanks to KYW." 

OEGE SCHILD, President 
Sehlld's I.G.A. Foodliner 



SALES UP IN '58? YES— 12%! 

"While the industry was taking a 

20' ', dive in new car sales, 

we racked up a 12' , increase. 

Reason— KYW radio spots!" 

HAROLD STAN 
Spitzer Motors (FORD) 



TETLEY 



ES 



W 



\ 



TEA I 

BAGS^ pi 

FOR TEA BAGS 



167 



SAY TEA ON RADIO— AND SEE! 

"Our sales arc considerably 

over last year's 

...and much of the credit must go 

to our radio spots on KYW." 

JOHN A. DINGETHAL 
Tetley Tea Co., Inc. 



ItYW Cleveland 



• Vacation spot: Pat Landon of 
WRCV, Philadelphia, hand-ad- 
dressed over 500 post cards to Phila- 
delphia agencies. The cards read: 
"Having a wonderful time. Wish 
your spots were here." The cards 
were mailed from Atlantic City, site 
of the d.j.'s summer broadcasts. 

• Doing his bit for auto safety: 
Ben Geller, Chicago auto dealer, over 
the Independence day weekend, spon- 
sored a saturation campaign of spot 
announcements on WAAF, consist- 
ing of all the sounds of a major auto 
smash up, followed by a verbal 
warning to drive with care. 

• WCCC, Hartford, is conduct- 
ing a campaign awarding engraved 
wrist watches to the city's outstand- 
ing newsboys. The first winners had 
their awards presented to them by 
Governor Abraham Ribicoff on the 
steps of the State Capitol. 



Station purchases: Mrs. Geneva 
Gee, WCMW, Canton, Ohio and 
WARU, Peru, Indiana, from Mr. S. 
L. Huffman . . . Brokered by Black- 
burn & Co., Washington St.: Sher- 
wood Gordon, KSDO, San Diego, 



from San Diego Broadcasting for 
$700,000; Louis Strick and Joseph 
Calderon, WAMV, East St. Louis, 
111., from Robert W. Day. for $300.- 
000, and Thomas Potts, WDNF, An- 
niston, Ala., from Ralph Allgood and 
Grover Wyse, for $85,000 . . . Victor 
Bellamy, WSTL, Eminence, Ky., for 
$70,000, from J. W. Dunavent, bro- 
kered by Paul H. Chapman, Inc., At- 
lanta. 

Call letters change: WAGA, At- 
lanta, to WPLU. 



Plough Broadcasting named this 
management team for its entire group : 
Roger May, former sales mgr., 
WMPS, Memphis, to v. p. in charge 
of sales; E. M. Plumstead, former 
program coordinator, to v.p. in 
charge of programing; Joseph 
Deaderick, engineering coordinator. 
to v.p. in charge of engineering; Vol- 
ney Edwards to assistant secretary- 
treasurer; W. E. Crump, program 
director WMPS, to director of pro- 
duction and special features; C. G. 
Simmons to director of recording. 

Plough Staff appointments: Allan 
Avery, sales mgr. and Don Stevens 



to program director, WMPS; Claude 
Frazier to gen. mgr. and v.p., WPLO, 
Atlanta. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Forjoe-Tv, Inc., has announced 
the opening of a Detroit sales of- 
fice and division, with Larry Gen- 
tile as general manager. 

That gives For joe offices in seven 
major cities throughout the country. 

Rep appointments: WBAY-TV- 

AM, Green Bay, to KATZ . . . 
WERE, Cleveland, WERC, Erie. 
Pa., WOLF, Syracuse and WTKO, 
Ithaca to Venard, Rintoul & Mc- 
Connell, New York. 

Personnel appointments: Andrew 
Powell, spot tv sales mgr., PGW, 
San Francisco . . . David Smith, 

director of research, AM Radio Sales 
. . . Cornelius Pugh, Jr., tv sales 
staff, George P. Hollingbery Co. . . . 
Shifts at Adam Young: John Stella 
to manage Chicago office and Clinton 
O'Dell Simpson to office mgr., St. 
Louis. 





ii Mim i ii ' i ■ ■ " — —■I 

189f 



2/35 




BIGGEST SALES IN 51 YEARS 

"Had second largest week 

and largest single day of selling 

in 51 year history 

. . . thanks to WOWO." 

SOUDERS HOME FURNITURE STORE 
Grail], Indiana 



100% SALES INCREASE! 

"Ottr sales and 
distribution increased 

from £2% to 88% 
through WOWO spots." 

EVANS INDUSTRIES 
(Better Bite Dog Food) 



MERCHANTS DOUBLED BUSINESS 

"WOWO's enormous coverage brought 

in enough new out-of-town 

prospects for our merchants 

to double their business." 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 
Decatur, Indiana 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE @£j® STATI' 



TV STATIONS 



In the fall of 1958, according to 
Nielsen, when there were 481 sta- 
tions in operation, the percent- 
ages of homes able to reach one 
-l ;il ion or more were these: 
No. STATIONS % HOMES 

4 or more 81% 

2-3 17 

1 station 2 

KMBC-TV-AM, Kansas City, took 
i survey among local merchants 
m how the newspaper strike af- 
ected them and the findings in- 
dicated: 

1) The two leading food chains 
ound business had held up well. 

2) Downtown department stores 
,ales were even with the year before, 

\m though the pinch was felt on 
^ch promotional items as air condi- 
.ioners, swim suits, etc. 

3) Sales on new cars were up, but 
ised car lots estimated they were 
0-25% off their expected levels. 

, Incidentally, KMBC distributed 30,- 
'00 copies of its twice-daily news 
heet during the strike. 



Ideas at work: 

• Flying the Colors: WJZ-TV, 

Baltimore, flew films of the raising of 
the new 49 star flag at Fort McHenn 
to five Alaskan tv stations. 

• WILX-TV is sending out, to 
agencies and advertisers, a package of 
10 breakfast cereals, "compliments of 
channel 10," with promotional ma- 
terial tying in with the stations open- 
ing of a new studio in Michigan's 
"Cereal City." Battle Creek. 

• WNBQ, Chicago, is sending out 
invoices representing nearly one-half 
million dollars, to 50 public service 
organizations, marked "Paid in Full." 
The figure represents the estimated 
dollar value of the time devoted to 
these various organizations. 

• Tour de force: 96 antique 
autos turned out for the fifth annual 
antique auto tour presented jointly 
by WOOD-TV, Grand Rapids, and 
the Grand Rapids chapter of the 
Horseless Carriage of America. 
WOOD-TV featured live coverage of 
the tour's arrival and departure. 

• Hot Idea: WCAE, Pittsburgh, 
ran a "Guess the Hottest Day and 
Temperature During the Month of 
June" contest. Several thousand en- 



tries were received, with the winner 
receiving a portable transistor radio. 

Thisa k n' data: On WRVA-TV, 

Richmond, Va., Cy Newman, "The 
House Detective," entered his eighth 
year of broadcasting this real estate 
program . . . WJAR-TV, Providence, 
celebrated its tenth anniversary with 
a three-day "Summer Fair." . . . Over 
one hundred agency people, food 
brokers and grocery representatives 
were hosted by WMTW-TV, Poland. 
Maine, at the second annual Mt. 
Washington party. 

Kudos: To KSBW-TV, Salinas. 
Calif., the California Press Tv Radio 
Assoc. "Certificate of Excellence," for 
outstanding work in the field of spe- 
cial events ... To KABC-TV, Holly- 
wood, a special commendation from 
Los Angeles Councilwoman Rosalind 



negro radio for 
metro new york 




RADIO SPREADS FAME 

"We're doing construction 

in cities as far 

as 50 yniles away due to 

WOWO advertising." 

CLARENCE BULTEMEIER 
f> Builder Supply Co.. Decatur, Indiana 



$66,000 WORTH OF TRAILERS 

"We sold $66,000 worth 

of trailers, and 90% of the crowd 

that came to buy 

said WOWO brought them in." 

ADAMS COUNTY TRAILER STORE 
Decatur. Indiana 



MORE? 40% MORE! 

"Our distribution was about 

60' ( for years. 

Just four months on WOWO 

sent it up to 100'', ." 

BUTTERFIELD CANNING CO. 



IVOWO Fort Wayne 

REPRESENTED BY AM RADIO SALES. INC. t^W 



Wyman. for KABC-TV's Traffic 
Court series ... To WTVR, Rich- 
mond, from the Army, a plaque com- 
mending the station's outstanding 
support of the Army information pro- 
gram ... To KCRA-TV, Sacramen- 
to, assistant promotion mgr. Don 
Sarle, Jr.. and art director Robert 
Miller, a $1,000 prize in the Thin 
Man national station promotion con- 
test. 



Personnel appointments: James 
Moore, named president, WSLS-TV- 
FM. Roanoke. Va. . . . James Arthur 
Yergin, assistant director of research. 
Westinghouse Broadcasting . . . Diek 
Barrett, account executive, KMTV, 
Omaha, Neb. . . . William Hune- 
feld, sales mgr. KPIX, San Francisco 
. . . Jack Kavanagh, promotion mgr., 
WPRO-TV, Providence, R. I. + 



negro radio for 
metro new york 




RADIO RESEARCH 

(continued from page 32) 

program, there are already a lot of 
facts available on the exposure of 
purchasers to radio (as compared 
with other media ) on the day of buy- 
ing. 

Between the home and the shopping 
center, new facts about radio listening 
are being uncovered almost daily. 

"The Facts About Auto Radio" a 
recent publication of RAB shows 86% 
of all new cars (100% in the case of 
the three highest-priced cars) are sold 
radio-equipped. 

It is hard to understand how a 
critic of radio research would want 
any documentation beyond this fact 
alone to justify a radio buy; how 
many cars are equipped with news- 
papers, magazines, tv? But there are 
plenty more statistics on out-of-home 
listening if he cares to look for them. 

Out-of-door radio has been checked 
by various researchers on the high- 
ways, at stop-light intersections, at 
parking lots in shopping centers, and 
through in-home interviews via re- 
call. It has been studied on the 






beaches, in parks and playgroun 
and in business establishments. 

For example, want to know he 
much on-the-job listening to radi 
there is? Based on a sample draw 
by the research department of Dun 
Bradstreet in a market frequentl 
used as a test by leading advertise] 
because of its "representative" cha: 
acteristics, RAB discovered that nea 
ly eight out of 10 business establisl 
ments have one or more radio se! 
on the premises; that additional sell 
are found in some 63% of firms wh 
report that employees bring portab 
radios to work with them. Put th 
study together with the fact that tr 
U.S. working force numbers some 7 i 
million and a new dimension emerge! . 

Or perhaps one wants to go a ste 
beyond auto radio? Well, here ai 
some highpoints of a study by RA 
on truck radio: 

Nearly 30% of surveyed trucl 
were equipped with a working-ordf 
radio. 

Among drivers of these truck 
more than six out of 10 report the 
listen to their truck radios more tha. ' 
two hours daily. 

What does this mean to the buyt 



Mrs. Grass 

Veqetable 

Noodle Soup 




29 21 






MOVIES DEAD? 

"wind helped give us the 

highest gross in the 20-year 

history of the theatre." 

ESQUIRE THEATRE 



SELLING FOR THE WORLD'S LARGEST! 

"The outstanding pulling 

power of wind has helped make 

us the world's largest 

individual Chevrolet dealer." 

MARVIN H. FRANK, President, W B. Doner and Co. 



10 DAYS— 100% DISTRIBUTE 

"We've pulled 36,000 repliM 
to offer made on wind I 
exclusively — and achieved !($• 
distribution in 10 days!" 

DONALD GRASS, I. J. Grass Noodleo. 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE ®fi)@ STAT 



i. 



If advertising'.'' Perhaps not much. 

|)r perhaps a great deal — if he is in 

>ie gas and oil business, tires, auto- 

liotives and batteries or if he has 

ae additional knowledge that truck 

rivers earn about 15$ more than 

ie average industrial or manufactur- 

lg employee. 

It is easv to be handed one statistic 

nd then cry out that it isn't enough. 

he smart media buyer is the one 

ho, when handed one statistic, puts 

to work with other statistics from 

ther sources and comes up with a 

omplete justification of his judg- 

iciit in a buy. No statistic is better 

lan the use to which it is put. 

To criticize radio research on the 

rounds that samples aren't big 

nough is not realistic either. Usually, 

;ie suggestion is that if samples were 

oubled, the resultant figures would 

e twice as accurate. "This is not 

ie case," says Pulse's Roslow. "Any- 

ne w ho knows research knows that 

i halve the margin of error, a sample 

mst be quadrupled." The question 

len becomes: Who is going to pay 

>r quadrupling the work of a sur- 

■\ ? As it is now, some agency men 

laim that the radio industry should 



spend more of its own industry for 
research. 

"What's wrong with advertisers 
spending their money, too?" asks 
Roslow. Actually, some agencies or 
individuals within agencies do radio 
research on their own. 

For instance, there have been agen- 
cy buyers who have refused to be led 
into a follow -the-leader-game on radio 
"prime time" and have investigated 
within the markets they were con- 
sidering the actual starting and 
stopping time of factory shifts to de- 
termine exactly when workers were 
out of bed and in their cars listening 
to radio. The results of such investi- 
gations have often been startling. A 
7 to 9 a.m. buy (and its correspond- 
ing 4 to 6 p.m. buy for a traffic audi- 
ence) have sometimes proved a miss. 
In some markets, depending on the 
major industries of the area (rubber 
manufacture, oil refining, etc.), road 
traffic of workers has fallen off to 
nothing by 7 a.m. because 80' ^ of 
the workers are already punched in 
and on the job by then. Rep firms 
and stations within various markets 
have proved such points with their 
own research. (See picture, page 31) 



LESLIE SALT 

{continued from page 39 I 
Murphy. Sales soared in the test mar- 
kets, and retailer reaction was unani- 
mously enthusiastic. 

Flipping through a file of year-end 
sales reports, he showed sponsor such 
retailer comments as: 

"Last (wo week- i December 1-1") > 
amazing. Displays sold down in a 
couple of dav s. 

"Have re-ordered twice since last 
saw you. 

"We felt the soundness of our new 
packaging concept had been proven," 
savs Murphy, "and that we could 
safelv push ahead with 'Operation 
Breakthrough' — that is, carrying the 
Finger-Tip Pak to Northern Cali- 
fornia, Oregon, Washington, Nevada 
and Hawaii." 

Approximately 53% of the budget 
was earmarked for introducing the 
package in these states. Media strate- 
gy was duplicated: Saturation sched- 
ules of minutes I both daytime and 
nighttime) were bought in each of 
the 19 markets, plus 1,000-line two- 
color ads in 27 newspapers and a 
strong schedule of trade journal ads. 
In the introductory and follow-up 






• .39 




87 



nrn 



M-ES BUILD $5 MILLION PLANT 

"wind played a big part in 

creating the demand for 
product that has made possible 
<mr new $5-million plant!" 

'•■'- E SALERNO. Salerno-Mejjowen Biscuit Co. 



NOW NO. 2 IN SALES 

"We've just jumped to second 

biggest seller in this market — and 

it wouldn't have been possible 

without our No. 1 salesman — wind." 

HARRY KLECKNER, V.R. Thomns J. Webb Co. 



RADIO TAKES A BOW 

"wind can take a deep bow for 

playing a major part in helping us 

become the world's largest 

formalwear rental operation." 

BENJAMIN J. GINGISS. President, Ginciss Bros.. Inc. 



VI ND 




markets, the Leslie brand was well 
known. In fact, Leslie now claims 
sales leadership in these markets. 

However, in the third area sched- 
uled for the new package introduc- 
tion — Utah, Idaho. Montana, Colora- 
do — was virgin territory for Leslie. 
Because this area posed entirely new 
problems of staffing, shipping, dis- 
tribution and advertising, a special 
budget was allocated for the introduc- 
tion. The same tv-print pattern was 
used: saturation tv spot announce- 
ments backed up by newspaper and 
trade journal ads. "Sales to date 
indicate equally productive results," 
says Murphy. 

Concurrently, in the Southern Cali- 
fornia market, the follow-up phase 
was in effect: emphasis was shifted 
from hard-sell explanatory copy in 
minutes to reminder I.D.'s, with a 
sharp increase in frequency. 

"Though Leslie feels it can main- 
tain its sales advantage easily," says 
Murphy, "we realize fully that the 
new package does not create new 
business per se. Rather, the Finger- 
Tip Pak switches customers from one 
size to another — and more tangibly, 
from other brands to Leslie. ^ 



CHATEAU MARTIN 

( continued from page 43) 

cumstances for your product under 
these conditions requires interesting 
the dealer in your advertising. One 
way Chateau Martin does this is with 
free helicopter rides for dealers with 
the "Flying Reporter" while the copy 
is being read over the air. 

Here, an indirect technique applies. 
The personality doing the commercial 
must understand it from the dealer's 
point of view. That's why Curtis' in- 
doctrination of d.j.'s involves a run- 
down of the trade problems cited 
above, so that the copy will "ring 
true" in the trade. This is particularly 
important in view of the "aged in 
oak" crusade which has been built 
into the campaign. 

This is the technique that applies in 
the three Connecticut markets where 
the campaign is now running. Jingle 
lead-in plus ad lib copy is the pattern 
on the three Connecticut stations used : 
WBIS, Bristol; WMHC, New Haven; 
WWCO. Waterbury. Average fre- 
quency: 30 spots per week, prime 
time minutes mainly, some weekend. 

The techniques outlined above will 
apply to Chateau Martin's advertising 



plans for the rest of Connecticut 
Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and; 
Washington, D. C. Current cam-; 
paigns will remain in effect in the fall 
when the new ones begin. The "aged 
in oak" pitch will be common to all. 

Key phrase of the jingles now — as 
in 1936 — is "I'm nuts about zee Cha- 
teau Martin Wine." Gone is his well- 
remembered phrase "I go quick get 
my citizenship papers," his reaction 
after stepping from the boat and sip- 
ping Chateau Martin. 

Many folk who couldn't tell you 
the age of a wine can tell you about 
any subtle changes that occur in 
Gaston. Even though Lefcort has 
spent large sums to record new Gaston 
commercials, they were always meti 
with disapproval. Gaston afficionados 
wanted the unvarnished original. 

Gaston's voice belongs to Irving 
Kaufman, an old vaudevillian who 
made the Keith circuit as one of the 
Avon Comedy Four. He is now re- 
tired in Florida. In efforts to find 
that "unique combination of gayety 
and schmalz," Lefcort has turned 
to other ex-vaudevillians, but always 
with the same result: back to the 
original Gaston. ^ 







CPM:GC 



BIG COVERAGE. ..BIG BUSINESS 

"As one of Portland's largest 

retail clothiers, tve 

needed big coverage . . . and got more than 

excellent results with KEX." 

E. R. NUDLEMAN 
Nmlleman Bros. 



NEVER HAD IT SO GOOD 

"KEX gave us more 
advertising coverage for less 

money than any other 
advertising medium ever!" 

JACK DORRIES, Owner 
Dorries & Dorries-Rugs 



EXPERT'S CHOICE 

"We have long recognized the impo) to 

of KEX's ability to effectively 
cover the Portland and Willamette To 
markets for our several clients." 

ROBERT L. WEBER 
McCann-Erickscm, Inc. 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE 



STATI 



SPONSOR ASKS 

[continued from page 51) 

Now if some one could light a fuse 
under major manufacturers to join 
l!C \ in really promoting color tv that 
explosion you hear will be the boom 
resulting from the customers rushing 
to get on the color bandwagon. 



Owen Sadler, executive rice //resilient, 
.May Broadcasting Company, Omaha. 

Relatively speaking. Omaha is a 
mature tv market. 

We were equipped for network col- 
or in December. 1953. We did first 
live color studio shows, in September 
1955, and color film slides in Janu- 
ary, 1956. Omaha, in one sense, is 
parallel nationally in promotion of 
color; only one network (NBC) has 

i produced color nationally, only one 
Station (KMTV) in Omaha. Fortu- 

■ nately KMTV and NBC had been af- 

; filiated in promotion of color. Though 

Dr. T. C. Coffin, included Omaha 

among 5 American cities in latest 

NBC color survey by Trendex: 

1. 50% of color sets were in use 

I compared with 43% black and white. 




2. Twice as many watch color 
shows on color sets. 

.'!. Color program enjoyed 50' < 
advantage in share of audience among 
color owners. 



Omaha is 
among the 
leaders in color 
set sales 



4. On the average the number of 
viewers was 12' \ greater. 

I hat such startling results were not 
accidentally come by in Omaha due 
to the fact that in 1956 we were first 
individual station in the country to 
have live opera, live boxing and live 
wrestling in color. Almost cartoons, 
top feature films, top specials events 
in color. Ar-Sa-Ben directly from 
Coliseum, artists studio, extremely 
difficult leg operation, enabling a lit- 
tle girl to walk were in color. 

Omaha's not only ready for, but 
has been enjoying it handsomely for 
the past seven years. 



MARKETING 

[continued from page .'17 i 

buyer is often called on to make a 
last decision, an independent one or 
a compromise. "That's the clinch situ- 
ation when you draw on all the in- 
formation \ou have about the ac- 
count, and come up with the right de- 
cision," says Mr. Kemp. 

He contends it is the agenc\"s job 
to encourage this amassing of client 
information by buyers, and that if 
buyers are content with the status quo 
and "being in a rut"' the) should be 
eliminated. Today's need, he affirms, 
is for a buyer who understands the 
complexity of advertising as well as 
the techniques of buying. 

He thinks it's the smaller agencies, 
not yet shifted to the account group 
system, which still tend to pla\ up 
the account man and diminish the 
role of the people who cooperate with 
him, relegating the timebuyer to "a 
serf-like position of taking orders 
and buying by rote." 

What makes a good timebuyer in 
today's marketing world? 

Hal Davis answers: "A person who 
has mastered the techniques of the 




"' 



■ # 



'K 




|s£J f\ I V D 



10. 1 CAR... NO. 1 STATION 

"As Oregon's Number One 
tl Dealer we arc looking forward 

to continued success with 
■ ton's number one radio station." 

H. ROGERS HOPKINS. JR. 
Manager, Francis Motor Car Co. 



INQUIRIES UP 500% 

". . . 500',', increase in inquiries 

about our medical 

and hospital coverage as a 

result of spots on KEX." 

A. O. GARDEN. Director of 
Advertising & Promotion. National Hospital Association 




^^ « 



WAITING IN LINE 

"Five people were waiting 

to bug as we opened up. Each 

heard our KEX spots— came 

from beyond newspaper perimeter. 

JOHN WAR EH AM 
Wareham Motor Co. 



KEX Portland 



REPRESENTED BY AM RADIO SALES. INC. 



buying trade and who has the infor- 
mation at his or her fingertips; some- 
one with creative curiosity about their 
specific end of the ad business as well 
as all phases of it; someone who goes 
beyond the function of media buying 
and who operates within the total 
agency group as an advertising pro- 
fessional and a technical specialist.'" 
This kind of upgrading, of course, 
means a higher calibre of timebuver, 
and this, in turn, means more money 
for buyers' salaries. "Some agencies 
still pick up people off the street," says 



Frank Kemp, "and maybe that's all 
you need if you want to make their 
decisions." 

But the buyer should play a far 
more important role, and is fully ca- 
pable of sparking creative copy and 
marketing ideas which lead to entire 
campaigns. As Mr. Davis says, "The 
only really great creative work comes 
out of the very best kind of market- 
ing plan. Media people of the kind 
we want help our creative staff to be 
creative!" 

He theorizes that the failure by 



PEPSLCOLA's Dollar 
Buys More on 
WKOW-TV 




"The merchandising effort 
made on our behalf by 
WKOW-TV's Merchandis- 
dising Department has added 
greatly to the effective im- 
pact of our spot schedule. 
Personal calls on dealers, 
a detailing of our program 
in merchandising letters, 
and the window display at 
the downtown studio have 
aroused retailer interest 
and support. This 'plus' 
service is greatly appre- 
ciated. 

H. H. Levenick 
Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. 
Madison, Wisconsin 



"Thank you, Mr. Levenick, for this opportunity to prove 
that WKOW-TV sells best where they buy more." 

Ben Hovel 
General Manager 
WKOW - WKOW-TV 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 




many agencies to implement their 
media department with more status 
and authority to match responsibility 
comes from a "basic insecurity of 
the agency or the account group or 
both." 

Clients are demanding more per- 
sonalized service, and "an agency 
should be very concerned about giv- 
ing — and giving the impression of — 
representation in depth on every ac- 
count. Obviously, client contact at 
every level should be handled judic- 
iously. Some like frequent agency 
meetings, others few such sessions. But 
most accounts like to know the kind of 
people who are working for them." 

Frank Kemp, elaborating on the 
association of timebuyers with cli- 
ents in conference sessions, claims 
there's a saving of both time and pos- 
sible embarrassment if a buyer is on 
hand to answer specifics about a me- 
dia buy competently. 

Their consensus: Media is a vital 
link in the ad agency chain, and the 
buyer is a vital link in the media 
chain with functions which transcend 
the wielding of a slide rule. ^ 



TELEVISION 

KAN 5*f%5* 
St 18 / 

1% I Whs 




DJiMb 



serving w uawua/ PLUS 

14 OTHER IMPORTANT 
KANSAS COMMUNITIES 



BLAIR TELEVISION ASSOCIATE* 




STUOIOS IN HUTCHINSON AND WICHITA 
1 HOWARD 0. PETERSON, GEN.MGR. ' 



74 



SPONSOR • 11 JULY 1959 



THE DIFFERENCE 
IS TREMENDOUS!! 

One "Key Executive" can 
make a tremendous 
difference on your 
management team . . . 

This man can be your 
answer to future growth 
in the industry. 

BUSINESS EXPERIENCE: 

• 18 years in broadcasting 

• Sales and management experi- 
ence 

• 2 years national TV sales 

PERSONAL: 

• 35 years old, family of 4 

• College graduate 

• Outstanding Young Man of the 
Year 

• Church official 

These men will tell 
you more about him . . . 

• Bank President 

• V.P. TV Station 

• Agency President 

• City Mayor 

• V.P. Major Food & Drug 
Marketer 

• V.P. Major Food Chain 

His Interest: 

Station Management 
Sales Management 
Radio or Television 

Your Contact: 

Write Box 77 
SPONSOR 






KATZ STUDY 

(continued from jxige 34) 

sales territory" — the tv signal covers 
a buying area in suburbs, satellite 
towns and rural regions where sales 
often match or exceed city sales. 

Spot tv's cume audiences are trans- 
lated into sales manager terms. Using 
Nielsen figures for New York, Chicago 
and St. Louis, Katz lists % of tv 
homes "called on" 1>\ schedules of 
6, 12, and 24 daytime spots weekly, 
and 2, 4, and 6 nighttime spots. 

Summer vacations, a bugbear for 
many sales executives, are dealt with 
b) pointing out that spot tv does need 
them, and can work effectively during 
the summer months when "25.3% of 
annual retail sales occur." 

According to the study, "your cus- 
tomers are exposed to 1,518 adver- 
tising impressions a day. Therefore, 
it may he wise to make your tv sales 
calls 52 weeks a year to hold your 
own in the battle for consumer 
dollars." 

Of special interest to sales mana- 
gers, says Katz, is the fact that "your 
Spot Tv Commercial Salesman does 
some of his best work nights, Satur- 
days, Sundays, holidays, and even 
works late evenings for less money." 

Furthermore, he has "no expense 
accounts, no payroll time between 
calls, no reception room waiting, no 
grumbling, no backtalk, no blue Mon- 
days, no sick days off, no 8$ a mile." 

All of which adds up, according to 
the Katz presentation, to two impor- 
tant points for sales managers. 

1. Recognize spot tv for what it is 
— the strong right arm of your sales 
department. 

2) Place part of your sales budget 
(at least 10%) in market-by-market 
tv. 

This latter proposal. Katz makes 
clear, is in addition to recommenda- 
tions for greater advertising dollars 
in spot tv. As the "Sales Managers 
Medium," spot tv can replace person- 
al salesmen and should therefore be 
given consideration as an extra sales 
department investment. ^ 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



A SIGHT TO SEE! 



KTLE 

CHANNEL 6 




.jMcfc'wai^t 



TELEVISION STATION 



BASIC NBC 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

FORJOE & COMPANY 



New York - Chicago - los Angeles - Atlanta 
San Francisco - Philadelphia 



r 



• SPRINGFIELD 

• DECATUR 

• CHAMPAIGN-URBANA 



\\ 



Tl 



WUeae Mid Am&uca 
Jliuel ana. Buyl . . . 



#59 



t. 



METROPOLITAN MARKET 

"A" 



N£j 



GRADE 




SPRINGFIELD 

WICS 

DECATUR 




OVER 230,000 TV FAMILIES 
AVAILABILITIES: YOUNG TV 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 



75 



\ ■'■ 



•^"C 
V »- 



ii 



» 



Ii 



I" 1 ; 



•^ • • • •• * 



111! 




■ tit* J|7 



«a«r*j*. 



A 



bridge is a faster way to cross a river. When you take 
it — you buy time. 



^m 



Actually, to get our work week done, all of us purchase 
this commodity from one another. When you hail a cab, 
board a plane, or just pick up your phone you 
buy time. We could go on. 

When you buy SPONSOR you buy time, too, 

and you ought to know just how much you're buying for 

how little. 

You buy informative time: — a staff of the best reporters 
in the field deliver up to the minute news every week, 52 
weeks in the year. You buy analytical time: — 
the keenest minds in the broadcast industry give you 
studies in penetration of the important trends of the 
day. You buy digested time: — assembled and assimilated by 
experienced hands to bring you the most comprehensive 
picture of the broadcast field. 

You're buying thousands of hours of this sort of time for 
just 15('- per issue — 52 issues for $8 a year. Can you afford 
to be without it? 



SPONSOR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 




John C. Moler has been appointed man- 
aging director of WIBG, Philadelphia. For- 
merly he was with WKY for seven years, 
where he worked up from local sales man- 
ager to assistant manager in charge of ra- 
dio. Prior to that, he was an account exec- 
utive with H. I. Josey & Company. An ex- 
Navy man, Moler has a B.S. in business 
finance from the U. of Oklahoma. He is 
married and has one daughter, born in 1953. Moler succeeds Lionel 
Baxter, promoted to v.p. of Storer Radio Operations last month. 

Seymour Banks was named a v.p. of 
Leo Burnett Company, Inc. Currently, he 
is manager of media and program research 
A Ph.d. in Business, Banks has been in 
Burnett's media and research departments 
since 1951. Earlier, he taught advertising 
and marketing at De Paul U. and the U. 
of Chicago. Extra-curricularly. he is chair- 
man of the audience concept committee of 
the Advertising Research Foundation. Also appointed v.p.'s at Bur- 
nett: Herman A. Bizzell, Peter Frantz and Philip M. Schacherer 

R. Peter Straus succeeds his father, Na- 
than, as president of WMCA Radio, N. Y. 
Young Straus began his career with the 
station in 1948 as director of news and spe- 
cial features. Three years later, he joined 
the International Labor Office, first as ex- 
ecutive assistant to the director-general in 
Geneva, Switzerland, and later as director 
in Washington, D. C. He returned to WMCA 
a year ago. Also named: Straus sr., chairman of the board after a 16- 
year tenure as owner and president; Stephen B. Labunski, v.p. 





B. Calvin Jones is the new director of 
programing and operations for KHOU-TV. 
Houston. A former program manager of 
KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh Westinghouse sta 
tion. Jones has won Freedom Foundation 
awards for two of his documentary pro- 
grams. His experience in tv goes back to 
1946 when, following his service in the 
Army, he joined WPTZ, Philadelphia, as a 
cameraman, and shortly thereafter rose to the 
Jones has produced and directed sequences of 



S*}^1 




rank of tv director. 
Wide, Wide World. 



How about 

ALASKA? 



Mow will your message cord 
through in those faraway sp<lj 
beyond the suburbs? An ivcA 
tower is a sure road to nowheiB 
Pre-testing becomes more afll 
more vital as costs grow. 

And film makes pre-testijB 
easy . . . lets you use impartM 
audiences where and when yfl 
want . . . lets you test to yqm 
heart's content . . . economical* 

Actually, film does three thirm 
for you ... 3 big important thin* 

1. Gives you the high-poll 
commercials you've cornel 
expect . . . fluff-free . . . su . 

2. Gives you coverage wH 
full pre-test opportunities! 1 

3. Retains residual values. I 

For more information write: 
Motion Picture Film DepartmeH 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPAIf 
Rochester 4, N.Y. 

East Coast Division 

342 Madison Ave. 
New York 17, N.Y. 

Midwest Division 

1 30 East Randolph Drive 
Chicago 1 , III. 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Blvd. 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 



W. J. German, Inc. 

Agents for the sale and 
distribution of Eastman 
Professional Motion Picture 
Films. Fort Lee, N.J.; 
Chicago, III.; 
Hollywood, Calif. 




Uways shooi it on EASTMAN FILM . . . You'll fad glad you did! 




SPONSOR 



Why advertisers add radio 

This week, the Jacob Ruppert Brewery in New York an- 
nounced a dramatic change in media strategy for its Knicker- 
bocker Beer summer campaign. 

Between now and the end of September, Ruppert will be 
spending $100,000 in spot radio. Maurice Atkinson, adver- 
tising manager, gives a major share of credit to RAB for pre- 
senting background material which brought about the deci- 
sion to divert funds to the radio medium. 

Says Atkinson, "We're continuing extensive tv activity of 
course, but we feel that radio gives us an added dimension. 
And from a creative standpoint we can do more with a one- 
minute radio announcement than we can do with a 10-second 
radio spot which we were using exclusively. 

"Also, we feel that we're reaching people with radio that 
we couldn't hit with tv — people in autos and the portable 
radio listeners, for example. And this radio penetration 
reaches its peak during the summer months, our most im- 
portant selling period." 

The Ruppert change in strategy, and the reasons behind it, 
are important lessons for all those media and advertising 
men who wonder "Why, when, how should we use radio?" 

Hassle over research 

Our lead story in this issue (page 29) highlights an un- 
usual situation in air media research. During the past year 
sponsor has talked with scores of agency men who feel that 
radio research has been lagging by comparison with that 
done for other media. 

Yet the facts are that radio is perhaps the best-researched 
medium in America today. Clearly there's something wrong 
when agency and advertiser opinion is so mistaken. 

We suggest that some media men may be using the "radio 
is under-researched" line to save themselves some hard dig- 
ging and thinking. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: An expanding role 
in agency organizations for media directors 
ivho fully understand not merely the costs, but 
the marketing, copy research and program 
problems of all types of air media planning. 



80 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

British cousin: Quote in TV Guide 
by British comedian Dave King: 
"There's little difference between Tv 
over there and over here — except for 
meetings. They kill me. Never seen 
so many sharpened pencils in my 
life." Wait' 11 you see the knives — 
they're pretty sharp too. 

No discrimination: The following 
exchange of correspondence was 
prompted by a contest run by Fam- 
ily Circle Magazine (print medium) 
which confused Jane Terrell, radio 
sales promotion for WBBM, CBS 
radio in Chicago (air medium). Jane 
wrote — to Family Circle — 
"Re: your marvelous contest. You 
say, 'all men and women who work 
in advertising and sales . . .' Then 
you become much more selective: 
'All employees in advertising and/or 
sales departments of manufacturers 
. . . All advertising agency personnel.' 
Now, which shall I believe? What 
about us little ones toiling in the net- 
work advertising and sales vineyard? 
Like, can we enter? Oh, never mind 
that. Of course we can enter. What 
I 



mean is — can we win : 



Signed 
ANXIOUS." 

Family Circle replied — 

"Dear ANXIOUS: 

I can understand your confusion 
over the vagaries of entering our con- 
test. I assure you they are purely in- 
tentional. Nevertheless, to answer 
your question, you can enter our con- 
test and you certainly can win! The 
other three judges would never let 
me get away with anything so un- 
chivalrous (even if I wanted to, 
which I don't) as preventing a girl 
from winning a nice prize just be- 
cause she works for CBS! 
Cordially, 
Arthur M. Hettich 
Promotion Director." 
That Family Circle is all-embracing. 

Cross-plug: A wealthy baker, famed 
for his altruism donated $10,000 to 
a church in dire need of money for 
improvements. "If there were only 
some way I could repay your gener- 
osity," said the grateful pastor. 
"Well," said the baker, "perhaps you 
could. Where you read that line in 
the prayer — 'And give us this day 
our daily bread' — maybe you could 
cut in the name of my brand." — 
Frank Hughes. 



SPONSOR 



11 july 1959 





HOW tO buy half a State ... and more 



In Oklahoma it's a cinch! Virtually half of the state is the Tulsa television market. It includes: 47% of the popula- 
tion: 45% of the retail sales; 45% of the food sales; 44% of the drug sales; 46% of the effective buying income ... of the 
entire state of Oklahoma. In addition, the Tulsa television market also includes 13 counties in Arkansas. Kansas 
and Missouri ... a whopping 330,780 television homes! 

The only way to reach the rich, dynamic eastern half of Oklahoma (and more) is via Tulsa television. In Tulsa, 
KOTV has been the first station in every rating report for the past 10 years. Represented by Petry. 



SOURCES NCS *3 ARB NIELSEN SALES MANAGEMENT 



• KOTV 



TULSA 



A CORINTHIAN STATION Responsibility in Broadcasting 

KOTV Tulsa • KHOU-TV Houston • KXTV Sacramento 'WANE & WANE -TV Fore Wayne 'WISH & WISH-TV Indianapolis 




CHANNEL \YA Jacksonville, Fla. 

The Best Of NBC and ABC Call Peters, Griffin. Woodward, Inc. 












■ 



18 JULY 1959 
40c a copy* $8 • y«ar 



NSS* 



SP 



-V 



J 



* 




«»OR 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS 



■ 





TV IS 
ROCKING 
WITH SPECIALS 

Fall gold rush is on a- 
nat'i advertisers line 
up $87 million worth 
of star-studded shows 

Page 29 

Around the 
world with 
the Oasis camera 

Page 32 



Bristol-Myers 
challenges 
radio's d.j.'s 

Page 35 



now 
represented 




Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

The Original Station Representative. 



How to sell 
time with 
tv tape 



Page 38 



: 




There's a world of difference 
between just taking a picture and that 
"quality touch" possessed by 
the photographer who paints with the 
magic of the lens. 

This same quality reflection is 
also apparent in the operations of 
today's better radio and 
television stations. 




radio & television 

dal las 



BROADCAST SERVICES OF THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS 



EDWARD RETRY & CO., NATIONAL REPRESENATI| 



But Will They Get It In 







. . . (With apologies to Stanley Flink, author 
of the popular new book of the same name) 

They will get it in Des Moines if your selling 
message is on KRNT-TV, the one television 
station with nearly all of the dominant 
local personalties. This is the station which 
gives your advertising the warm, personal 
endorsement that is so believable, so memor- 
able, so effective! KRNT-TV has TEN daily 
live-emceed local programs, five of which serve 
advertisers on a participating basis. 

To make certain you're not missing important 
profits which can be yours quickly and easily 
through frequent use of KRNT-TV pre-selling, 
call your Katz man for availabilities on 
this station — now! 

GET THIS ABOUT DES MOINES: 

* 49% of Des Moines families consist of 4 or more 
persons (a lot of people to sell to!) 

* 48% of Des Moines' population is between the ages 
of 21 and 39 (this is the age of acquisition!) 

* 50% of Des Moines heads-of-households earn $5,- 
000 or more annually (a lot of money to spend!) 



KRNT 



OVA! 




TV 



TELEVISION IN DES MOINES 




ii 



Variety Theater" 



Emceed by one of the middlewest's most popular people, Bill Riley, 

Variety Theatre is just one of the three daily KRNT-TV programs 

that are going to the Iowa State Fair, attended by half a million people 

each year. Now playing is a sensational showbill opening with Tne 

Little Rascals . . . followed by Our Miss Brooks, and headlining Amos 'n 

Andy! Hundreds of people will attend every performance of KRNT-TV 

programs at the fair . . . providing unusual opportunities for actual 

demonstrations and sampling. 

Variety Theatre is one of the most important entertainment events 

in Des Moines from 4:00 to 5:15 P.M. Daily 

4:00 to 5:00 p.m. Daily 



I'ONSOK 



18 july L959 



Represented by The Katz Agency 



the 

most; 




To say the least, WBIR-TV 
has THE MOST top-rated 
shows in Knoxville. And 
Man . . . that signal is WAY 
OUT ... it really COMES 
ON . ..in those 227, 166 TV 
homes in its coverage area. 
Call your Katz Man . . . 
MAN! 



WBIR-TV 

CHANNEL T f\ 

KNOXVfLLE-TENN. 




© Vol. 1.3, No. 29 • 18 JULY 1959 

Stttt&wnbk <«tiMn^. an m .tfMflM^ .^MBtow i immune 
PON SOR 

THE WEEKLV MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

Tv is rocking with specials 

29 The gold rush is on for fall of '59 as the three nets schedule some 
250 specials to cost advertisers staggering $87 million (time-talent) 

The world's a stage for Oasis 

32 From the French Riviera to Waikiki Beach goes Mc-E's Jim Manilla to 
turn out exotic Oasis cigarette commercials for tv. A story in picture! 

Bristol-Myers hurls challenge at the d.j.'s 

35 Company switched its Trig deodorant hudget from tv to spot radio in 
campaign keyed to imaginative use of fact sheet via contest among d.j.'s 

Selling time with tv tape 

38 Television Advertising Representatives, new WBC rep firm, installed tv 
tape in its offices to show admen local shows, custom-tailored spots 

Spot tv wins new $300,000 sponsor 

40 Multi-million dollar trails blazed by Eastman and Polaroid prove u 
ideal for reaching family, short-cutting costly store demonstrations 

Yes, Virginia, timebuyers listen to radio 

41 When Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove wanted to reach New York media execs 
via radio, it conducted its own survey. Here's the tongue-in-cheek report 

$$$ and sense for local radio/tv 

42 Carl Vogt, merchandising mgr. of WISN AM-TV, Milwaukee, says local 
merchandising is marketing, not promotion, outlines costing, planning 



FEATURES 

8 Commercial Commentary 

56 Film-Scope 

26 49th and Madison 

60 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

6 Newsmaker of the Week 

60 Picture Wrap-Up 

48 Radio Basics 

46 Sponsor Asks 

58 Sponsor Hears 



1 1 Sponsor-Scope 

74 Sponsor-Speaks 

50 Spot Buys 

74 Ten-Second Spots 

22 Timebuyers at Work 

72 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

44 Tv Results 

55 Washington Week 






Member of Business Publications fii £/'^l 

Audit of Circulations Inc. 5 — a ~* ~ 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive. Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: Murray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: SUperior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1959 Sponsor Publication Incs. 



SPONSOR 



18 july 1959 



Great Mo: 



f I 






KMOX Radio outweighs 
all other St. Louis media 
in community impact! 



The language was unfamiliar, but the sound was universal — the piping voice of a 

three-year-old singing his first song. In that moment, half a world of differences melted 

away. Because of young Tran-Van-Anh's song, Laos would never again be just a place 

on a map, nor its people nameless millions. Life among Tran-Van-Anh's people, in 

Communist-pressed Indochina, is brought home to KMOX Radio listeners through 

"Operation Medico" — a weekly report by Dr. Thomas Dooley, a St. Louis physician, 

on his mission to Laos. This is another example of the programming scope of the 

"Voice of St. Louis" — a voice that never talks down to its audience.* 

*The largest audience ever reported by Pulse for a St. Louis radio station. (Annual Cumulative Pulse studj of 
Metropolitan St. Louis, December 1954 thru January 1959) 



KMOX RADIO 

50,000 WATTS, REPRESENTED BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 



CBS 

IN 
ST. LOUIS 








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THE wtIKu MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 

Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 
Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Miksch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Gwen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
Jack Lindrup 
Gloria Florowitz 

Contributing Editor 

loo Csida 
Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 
Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 
Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 
Sales Manager 

James H. Fuller 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mqr. 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Administrative Mgr. 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Eastern Manager 

Robert Brokaw 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Seymour Weber 
Harry B. Fleischman 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

Laura Oken, Office Mgr. 
George Becker; Charles Eckert; 
Gilda Gomez; Priscilla Hoffman 



SPONSOR 



18 jlily 1959 






"Me 



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is just like this!" WJAR-TV not only has a corner on quality feature films in the Providence 
market, but also exposes them with rare showmanship. Morning and afternoon films, for example, 
are emceed daily by personable Jay Kroll who asks viewers to write and tell him what they would 
like to see, then waits for the mailman to clue him 
on local tastes. Between "acts", Jay interviews 
visiting celebrities, and leaders of local and national 
civic groups. "The Jay Kroll Show" — another 
good reason why WJAR-TV has won the TV heart 
of the Providence Market. 



10th Anniversary of CHANNEL 10 

-^WJAR-TV 



NBC 



Cock-of-the-walk in the PROVIDENCE MARKET 
ABC • Represented by Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 




PONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 






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OF VIEWERS IN 

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ARE TUNED TO 

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Represented Nationally by 
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One Rate Card 




NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



This week, a Haiti industrialist in concert with two 11. S. 
station group heads put some pepper in the Latin American 
tv sauce. A $250,000 station, Haiti's first, is the initial step in 
Caribbean network and further expansion in island area. 



The newsmaker: Mike Rosenberg, Haiti industrialist, en- 
visions a Caribbean network as immediate goal of a $250,000 plungi 
in Haiti. With partners Jerry Bartell, head of the Bartell stations, and 
Elroy McCaw, head of the Gotham Broadcasting group, Rosenberg 
has formed Hemisphere Television Corp. 

Initial venture is a vhf station in Haiti, slated to begin operating 
1 November. Though cautious about revealing countries they will 
invade next, Rosenberg told sponsor that "good possibilities an 
Chile, Honduras and Panama." 

Rosenberg strongly hinted that 
the pattern for expansion in the 
Caribbean will follow this pattern: 
Gonave I a nearby island I . Mar- 
tinique and Trinidad. 

Reasons behind choice of Haiti, 
with its four million population: 
I 1 1 areas closest to the U. S. are 
least expensive to handle. ( 2 1 
mountains (highest 6,000 feet) 
make it a good microwave point 
for eventual transatlantic broad- 
casting. 

"Another very important reason," Rosenberg said, "is Haiti's fierc 
independence. One of the problems in setting up stations in Latii 
America is government 'direction,' especially when the govern men 
is part owner of the station." 

Nonetheless, tv in Latin America is growing. Based on latest U. S 
Information Agency figures, E.I. A. and other sources, here is a run 
down of progress to date: 

Argentina — 1 station — sets in use: 250,000 

Bahamas — 1 station — sets: 6,000 

Brazil — 7 stations (all independents) — sets: 850,000 

Colombia — 9 stations (1 ind.. 8 boosters) — sets: 150.000 

Cuba— 23 stations (2 ind., 3 nets)— sets: 350,000 

Dom. Rep. — 3 stations (1 ind., 2 satellites) — sets: 7,500 

Guatemala — 2 stations (1 ind., 1 gov't I — sets: 20.000 

Mexico — 13 stations (3 nets) — sets: 450,000 

Nicaragua — 1 station — sets: 2,000 

Panama — 2 armed forces stations — sets: 8,000 

Peru — 2 stations — sets: 5,000 

El Salvador — 2 stations — sets: 7.000 

Uruguay — 1 station — sets: 15.000 

Venezuela— 11 (1 gov't. 2 ind. and sats.)— sets: 200.000 




Mi Ice Rosenbers 



SPONSOR 



1 

18 JULY 195 






NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 

KLAC appoints EASTMAN 



STANDS FOR LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 
The Nation's 2nd Market... 7 'A Million 

YES, AND IT ALSO STANDS FOR: 

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4. Unsurpassed News Staff 

5. Sam the Traffic Man 

6. Exciting Sports with Sam Baiter 

7. Powerful Merchandising Support 



■ 



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See your East/man for sales 
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NEW YORK: 

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PLaza 9-7760 





robert e. eastman & co., 



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national representatives of radio stations 



CHICAGO: 

333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Financial 6-7640 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

RussBldg. 

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YUkon 2-9760 



DALLAS: 

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ST. LOUIS: 

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LOS ANGELES: 

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PONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 




by John E. McMillin 



of Mississippi 
Retail Sales . . . 

$918,000,000 

IN THE SOUTH'S 

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TV MARKET 

Jackson, Miss 



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Commercial 

commentary 



Philosophers yet 

Jackie Robinson, erstwhile fiery second base- 
man of the even more erstwhile Brooklyn Dodg- 
ers, now conducts a thrice-weekly column of 
great moral earnestness in the august pages of 
the New York Evening Post. 

Jackie also, when he is not exploding in a 
flaming crusade for human rights, serves as vice 
president in charge of personnel for a great 
humanitarian corporation whose stock has recently achieved the 
pinnacle of American economic respectability, a listing on the Big 
Board of the New York Stock Exchange. 

I think Jackie Robinson is an authentic hero, a fine, fearless 
figure of a man whose history and exploits deserve admiration and 
real respect. 

Nevertheless, it is my painful duty to report that Jackie's company, 
the egregious Chock full o' Nuts Corp., is currently perpetrating on 
the American public the most alarmingly immoral commercials ever 
seen on home tv screens. 

And furthermore, nobody seems to care. 

Mice or moral leaders? 

Sometimes I just don't understand the people who criticize tv ad- 
vertising. 

If some downtrodden copywriter, struggling to support a termagant 
wife and four sniffling children in a Greenwich Village walkup, 
timidly suggests that owning a Thunderbird or a Roto-broil 400 
is an adjunct of "gracious living," they holler horribly about the 
"hidden persuasiveness" of the ad business. 

If some half-starved actress, hoping to get noticed for a part 
on Playhouse 90, displays an inch too much cleavage or a patch too 
much thigh, they snarl like the hypocrites in Hawthorne's Scarlet 
Letter. 

But when a great public-spirited corporation like Chock full o' 
Nuts, supported by an integrationist St. George like Jackie Robinson, 
advocates a social philosophy that patently and flagrantly insults the 
teachings of Moses, Jesus, Mohammed. Buddha and Confucius, 
nothing happens. What I want to know is, why not? 

Where is the Legion of Decency? Where is the National Council 
of Churches? Where are Bishops Oxnam. Pike and Sheen? Where 
is Rev. Martin Luther King? Where is Cardinal Spellman? 

What's the matter with you guys? Are you mice or are you men? 

Nuttin's plenty for nobody 

If you think I'm kidding about all this, you're only partially right. 
It is fun, of course, to tease the clergy and to take them publicly 
to task for neglecting their moral responsibilities. 
( Please turn to page 19) 



SPONSOR 



18 JULY 1959 



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share in the interests and enthusiasms of others... a "metropolitan" personality. 



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Representative: The MEEKER Company, Inc. 
New York • Chicago • Los Angeles • San Franclscc 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 195 f 









Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



18 JULY 1959 If y OU have any doubts about the demand that spot tv faces — especially in the 

copyright 1959 major markets — this fall, note this: It'll be the travelingest August and early Septem- 

sponsor ber for agency media people in some years. 

publications inc. Intent of the road-hitting: To make sure they're getting the best breaks possible 

for their spot tv schedules in the tight markets. 

A number of the Madison Avenue agencies with heavy spot stakes have told SPONSOR- 
SCOPE that they're already primed to spring members of their buying staffs for extensive 
station visits in the event the initial response to their requests isn't up to -mill . 

National spot tv buying was far more active in Chicago the past week than in New 
\ork, where they're apparently waiting until the last minute to see if better spots may open 
up by luck. 

In New York Avon cosmetics through Dreher was picking up six and eight 
plans while the National Assn. of Insurance Agents (Dorrance) moved to reactivate 
those markets (out of a total of 160) that were suspended for the summer. 

Even with the hiatus, the NAIA's collective pot for spot tv — sweetened by the casual- 
ty insurance companies themselves — will come around $1 million this year. 

The competitive targets of this campaign, which is definitely set to go into I960, are 
the direct writers like All-State, Nationwide, and State Farm Mutual. 

The main spot tv action out of Chicago was among the cereals, both for hu- 
mans and animals, with one campaign starting in August and the others in the fall. 

The specifics: Kellogg (Burnett), 13 weeks of children and adult minutes and chain- 
breaks in 10 Eastern markets, starting 3 August; Quaker Oats (Tatham-Laird), 40 weeks 
of half-hours in all West Coast markets, except L.A., to feature Aunt Jemima and Ken-L ra- 
tions; Hartz birdseed (George Hartman), 26 alternate-week half-hours in family time in 
12 markets. 

Another August starter: Parker Pen (Tatham-Laird), minutes. 20's and I.D.s for 
the back-to-school and Christmas shopping pushes (17 weeks). 



The actual figures won't be available for a couple months, hut the SRA's Lawrence 
Webb gave this as his offhand estimate of how national spot radio did tin- first 
six months of 1959: about 5% better than during the first half of 1958. 

That V v edge, according to Webb's expectations, was scored in the second quarter 
of the year. The first quarter, noted Webb, about matched the billings for the initial three 
months of 1958. (Under the new SRA system, the figures are released in half-year 
batches.) 

Toy manufacturers who rely on spot tv aren't taking any chances of being 
left out in the cold during the Christinas buying rush. 

They're making their purchases right now — with August starting dates. (One 
market where tv stations already have become loaded with this class of business is Boston.) 

Incidentally, tv continues to revolutionize the toy business. The manufacturers of 
low-priced toys and games, in particular, have embraced tv as the medium for year-round 
sales building. 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 11 




SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Elgin and JWT have about mapped out what they'll be doing in tv for the coming 
pre-Christmas season. 

The plan: minute participations and partnership in a special. 

Spot tv this week was faced with still another nighttime network tv announce- 
ment carrier: NBC TV made Laramie available (the other is Five Fingers). 
Altogether ABC TV has 11 shows of that category and CBS TV three. 

Add to the complexion-care bar-soap sweepstakes: Dial's lanolized version 

(FCB). 

It's Dial's answer to the cold cream additive brands, but Armour will keep this con- 
tender at the test market level a while. 



Y&R's current examination of radio's newest values has this angle: Its Chicago 
office, along with American Bakeries, is quizzing midwestern radio stations about accept- 
ing 2}/> -minute commercials. 

The format: music and dialogue. 

Members of the Stations Representatives Assn. in a few days will get a look at 
the revised version of the radio presentation that the SRA has been working on since 
last April. 

It will put the emphasis on such factors as the buying dimensions of the average 
family and how the housewife can be reached through radio. 

Look for the three soap giants to take a crack at the pharmaceutical field. 

In fact, Colgate is in the process of setting up one such product, and Lever is seriously 
interested in testing a couple. 

Marketers see this extension into the drug business as a logical step. From the dis- 
tribution point of view toiletries and pharmaceuticals are closely allied. Besides, there's a 
high margin in branded drugs. 

It's also a very risky business. The survival rate of new products is only 5-10' < . 



12 



The regional and local coffee brands in Chicago are taking a walloping as Hills 
Bros, and Folger are locked in battle for dominance of the market. 

While Hills and Folger are spending between $60-70,000 a week in Chicago h 
alone, even the big competitive nationals aren't attempting to match them in ad budgets. 

The real battleground is among the grocery chains, which — as the result of ape- 
cial deals — have been selling the two contending brands at sharp markdowns. 

The little brands fear that they'll be squeezed out unless they meet the giants 
through some cooperative effort or mergers. 

You can expect some serious wrestling between the tv networks and their mort 
rambunctious affiliates this fall over the right to DB daytime shows in order to mak< 
room for their own spot carriers such as feature films. 

This determination stems from the fact that the demand for daytime minutes i; 
greater than ever. Stations see only one way out of the shortage: Taping the network 
program and scheduling it where it's more convenient for the station. 

Despite warnings from the network, one of the most important station groups hai 
DB'd several serials to make room for spot carriers. A similar situation prevails at one o 
the old-line southern stations. 



SPONSOR 



18 JULY 19S f 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Affiliates of ABC TV and ISBC TV may find themselves with a shortage of 20- 
second spots when fall schedules get rolling. 

Both networks will have more hour shows than ever, and the practice is not to allow 
for a station break unless the show has multiple sponsors. 

NBC will have two exclusively sponsored one-hour periods Sunday night and one each on 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday nights. (Incidentally, both the Steve Allen and 
Perry Como shows will be single-sponsor affairs this year.) 

Rejoined a network executive when this station break situation was called to his at- 
tention: "The amount they'll get from us will amply make up the difference." 

There's been a decided drift away from local cut-ins, mainly because of (1) the 
prohibitive rate, and (2) agency dissatisfaction with the way they're handled by the 
smaller stations. 

Some media directors are under the impression that quite a few stations are inclined to 
discourage cut-ins because they realize they haven't the personnel that can do it 
efficiently. 

Notes the media director of a P&G agency: "Unless we do it on a sectional basis, 
we try to avoid cut-ins. However, a medium's success depends on its flexibility — see what the 
magazines are willing to do these days with split-runs — and the tendency to highhat cut- 
ins could some day turn out to tv's disadvantage." 

The mounting interest in specials among advertisers has forced the growth of 
a new breed within the tv/radio departments of the major agencies: specialists in specials. 

These agencies have found it imperative to have somebody on the staff free to concen- 
trate his attention in this area so that inquiries from clients can be handled intelli- 
gently. 

Agency managements recognize that more time will be spent by the specialist on specials 
he doesn't sell than on those he does. Nevertheless the specials field has become so allur- 
ing that it doesn't pay to take a chance. 

An analysis of the ratings of last season's specials by ARB for SPONSOR-SCOPE 
makes it abundantly clear that specials as a whole are good rating pullers. 

They're something an advertiser buys for superior quality, identification, excite- 
ment, or for public relations mileage. 

The analysis, to begin with, shows that the average multi-city ratings by program 
types for specials were these: variety, 24.3; drama, 19.9; music, 13.7; sports, 13.3; 
public affairs, 9.0; educational, 8.7. 

But note: Out of the 49 specials that fell within the variety category, only 13 turned 
up among the first 10 in their respective rating periods. The 13 were: 



DATE 


PROGRAM 


RATING 


AUDIENCE SH U(K 


14 Oct. 


Bob Hope 


26.3 


40.9 


18 Oct. 


Jerry Lewis 


31.9 


31.0 


27 Oct. 


Shirley Temple 


26.3 


41.6 


12 Nov. 


Shirley Temple 


30.3 


47.1 


22 Nov. 


Dean Martin 


2."..0 


14.6 


30 Nov. 


Wonderful Tow n 


31.0 


18.0 


1 Dec. 


Lucille Ball 


34.9 


61.3 


10 Dec. 


Jerry Lewis 


32.:: 


30.2 


3 March 


Some of Manies Friends 


32.3 


52.1 


6 March 


Oscar awards 


47.4 


78.6 


6 April 


Emmy awards 


33.7 


60.4 


26 April 


Meet Me in St. Louis 


27.7 


18.4 


1 June 


Summer on Ice 


28.9 


52.0 



18 july 1959 13 



SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 






As soon as the agency's roadmen have completed their phase of the project, JWT (New 
York) will start placing orders for some $3.5 million in spot radio in behalf of 
Ford dealers. 

The campaign will go into well over 100 markets and start toward the end of Sep- 
tember. Ruth Jones is heading up this operation. 

Not much has been heard from the other members of the Detroit big three as to their fall 
spot radio plans. But there are good indications that Chrysler at least will be in there 
with saturation splurges for its new economy-sized progeny. 

Pittsburgh Paint (Maxon) will be in spot radio in September for another four- 
week ride, stressing the need for a fall cleanup. 

There'll be about 450 stations in 125 markets in the splurge — all adding up to 
around 8,500 announcements and $100,000 in billings for the month's run. 

Unlike in spring, the Pacific Coast will be included this time. 

Here's how two leading contenders in the cold remedy field are going about the 
business of setting up their spot tv campaigns for the coming season: 

ANAHIST (Bates) : The buying is split up into two phases. It will pick up a few 
good spots immediately in the key markets and get them rolling the third week in Au- 
gust. But the bulk of the plans will be implemented in the meantime, with the second sched- 
ule taking off in 80-90 markets 21 September. Both flights will encompass 30 
weeks, and add up to around $4 million. 

VICKS (Morse International) : Media director Orrin Christy, Jr., chief timebuyer 
Roy McArdle, and assistant timebuyer Mary Ellen Clark are all on the road lining up 
schedules in the top 50 markets. This campaign will run around $2.5 million. 

Retail merchants within the next year will have available to them the finding! 
of an in-depth test on the effectiveness of tv in selling soft goods. 

It will be a four-step project, with the participants consisting of Patterson Fletcher, 
a leading specialty shop in Fort Wayne, WANE-TV, Fort Wayne, and the TvB. The major 
part of the test campaign starts in the fall. 

What gives this undertaking a strong sense of authenticity is the fact that the store will 
open its books for the benefit of other retailers — even competitors — so that they 
too can see how tv works in specialty marketing. 

Here's something that probably will nudge the national airlines toward embracing 
network tv: American Airlines has bought close to $1 million worth of participa- 
tions on ABC TV's Untouchables. 

As the network tells it: The contract was closed between an ABC salesman and a AA 
ad executive during a plane trip from St. Louis to Chicago. 

Media note: American has been spending about $1 million in radio. 

NBC TV is pointing with pride to how Today and the Jack Paar show have fared 
in billings. As of 1 July, Today was 81% and Paar 51% ahead of the same 1958 period 

Contributing to the hefty increase: The shows have been sold in dual fashion. In addi 
tion to going after small accounts, the network has convinced some of its bigger custom 
ers that they should use these fringe-time programs as supplementary tools. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 6: 
Spot Buys, page 50; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 60; Washington Week, page 55; sponsor 
Hears, page 58; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 72; and Film-Scope, page 56. 

14 sponsor • 18 JULY 195? 




for every 10 "food dollars" spent in 

Indianapolis Trading area . . . there 

are $14 spent in its Satellite Markets. 

More mouths to feed mean more money being spent 
for groceries . . . and there simply are more people in 
the Satellite Markets than in the 18-county Indianap- 
olis Trading Area. That's why this big Mid-Indiana 
television market is different . . . you can cover all of 
them with WFBM-TV. 

Where else will you find satellite markets that are 33% 
richer and 50% bigger than the Metropolitan Trading 

only basic NBC coverage of America's 
13th TV Market — 760,000 TV homes. 



INDIAN APOLIS Major retail area for 18 richer-than- 
average counties. 1,000,000 population-350,600 families with 90% 
television ownership! 



o 



11 SATELLITES-Each market within WFBM-TV's 
verified coverage ... Marion • Anderson • Muncie • Bloomington 

• Vincennes • Terre Haute • Danville, Illinois • Lafayette • Peru 

• Logansport • Kokomo. 



Zone itself? Where else do you find such a widespread 
area covered from one central point . . . and by just 
one station with no overlapping basic affiliates of the 
same network ? 

WFBM-TV dominates Mid-Indiana, because it is the 
only basic NBC outlet penetrating this market. Nielsen 
Coverage Study #3 confirms these facts . . . and we're 
proud of our ARB. Let us show you how to test 
regional marketing ideas with amazing results. 

Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 




BASIC NBC- 
TV AFFILIATE 



s NSOR 



18 july 1959 



15 



LIFT HERE FOR IMPORTANT NEWS FROM 




^ Commercial commentary 

continued from page 8) 

Bui I am deadly serious in believing that the current Chock full 
i \uls commercials, with their open, brazen insistence that "The 
>est tilings in life cost money," constitute the most dangerous, sub- 
ersive and immoral influence in tv today. 

Do you believe that "the best things in life cost money?" If 
ou do, \ou are setting your face against every great teacher and 
ooral philosopher who ever lived. 

There's no need to quote Scripture to prove this. You can start 
sith the Ten Commandments and the Sermon on the Mount and go 
traight through to the Bhagavad Gita without finding any support 
or the coffee makers viewpoint. This is a vicious modern heresy. 

\\ hen I was young, we were wholly confident that the "best things 
n life are free." and sang gaily about the "flowers in spring, the 
1.1,'m- that sing." and the fact that "love belongs to everyone" to 
nii\e our contention. 

Later, George Gershwin, in "I've Got Plenty of Nuttin'" immortal- 
zed the man who found "nuttin' plenty for me" as long as he had 
i- love and his song. And Gershwin's philosophy merely re-echoed 
.hat all the great poets and prophets — Isaiah, Plato, St. Francis of 
\—i-i — have been saying for 3,000 years. 

Chock full o" Nuts, however, has other, more revolutionary ideas. 

Their commercials, in fact, are redder and more godless than any- 
tiing that ever came out of Russia. Their battle cry — "The best 
in life cost money" is so crassly materialistic it makes Marx 
nd Lenin look like pale, wispy spiritualists. 

I think it is a lousy, sinful, wicked doctrine. And it is nothing I 

ant m\ children to hear — on tv or anywhere else. 

A Warning to Copywriters 

I he appearance, however, of these outrageous Chock full o* Nuts 
ommercials does illustrate certain points about tv advertising which 
lost of us are apt to forget. 

The first is that there are huge and important areas of public 
lorality for which no exact rules or laws can be drawn. I doubt if 
rrj I'v Code could ever be devised which would spell out in exact 
etail why copy such as Chock full o' Nuts should not be allowed. 

Second, the maintenance of decent ethical and moral standards 
n t\ depends, in the main, on aroused public opinion, rather than 
n a police force. If the churches, who certainly should know better, 
o Dot complain strenuously and specifically about the Chock full 

Nuts blasphemy, they have no right to castigate the advertising 
u-iness. 

Finally, and this is strictlv within the family. I'd like to issue a 
n'ld, avuncular warning to all tv copywriters. If you are ever 
impted to get philosophical — to mouth large eternal truths about 
fe in your commercials — don't do it. 

< liances are you'll end up sounding like a fool, or a blackguard. 
i worse. 

The guys who are grinding out those ponderously mental pieces 
boul "thinking men" for Viceroy are kidding themselves more than 
Byone else. The Compton copyman who turgidly insists that "read- 
lg is the most rewarding form of doing" lacks humor as well as 
hilosophy. 

\nd those ethical giants behind the Chock full o' Nuts commer 
ials will get their comeuppance. Do you want to bet? ^ 



"AT K-7, GENERAL 
ELECTRICS TRANSMITTERS 

ARE THEIR MOST 
IMPORTANT PRODUCT " . . 




" 'CAUSE . . 
WE JUST 
INSTALLED A 
BRAND NEW ONE! 




We wanted to 
make dang 
sure the pros- 
perous people 
of the Golden Spread got a 
good look at vibrant, new K-7 
... so, in June, we installed a 
new General Electric transmit- 
ter. This, combined with our 
recent increase to full power, 
assures everyone in this rich 
four-state area, a clear view of 
KVII-TV's exciting new program- 
ming. K-7 can put your brand 
where it will do the most good 
... in front of the people with 
money to spend. Let a Boiling 
man give you the details of 
KVII-TV's phenomenal growth. 

KVII-TV 

amarillo, texas 



C. R. 'Dick' 1 Wotn 
Vice-President and 
General Manager 



Represented 
nationally by the 
Boiling Company 



m\M.|; 



13 .illy 1959 



19 






BALANCE! The CBS Owned stations devote the same care and production values to pro 
grams in the public interest as they do to their entertainment schedules. 

As proof: since the beginning of the year, news, information and education programs or 
the five stations have won a total of 36 awards, plaques and honorable mentions. 

To cite but a few ... of three Sigma Delta Chi television journalism awards, two went t( 
CBS Owned stations. Five local "Emmys" (including a Special Station Achievement award) 
went to CBS Owned stations for public affairs programming. Four awards and honorable 



■^"*fc 




<4? i J § 

ab r m t 

CM: > •. ' ', 




aentions given by the Ohio State University Institute lor Education by Radio-Television 
. . a Sylvania award ... a National Headliner Silver Medallion . . . and so on. 
Unquestionably, it is the continuing commercial success of CBS Owned stations' entertain- 
nent schedules which makes possible the major-budget community service programs that 
.ttract large audiences. And thus insures the program balance— entertainment and informa- 
ion in generous measure— indigenous to wcbs-tv, new york; knxt, los angeles; wbbm- i v. 

HICAGO; WCAU-TV, PHILADELPHIA; KMOX-TV, ST. LOUIS. CBS TELEVISION STATIONS 




* * ITU !>, 







migjiiii 



invnnrtrr 



•• 



^WBWPI' 



1#&^ 



/ 




RUNAWAY SALES 

SUCCESS 

ALL ACROSS U.S.A.! 



N 
E 
W 

S 



ORTH 

Detroit, St. Louis, 
Cleveland, Ft. Wayne! 

AST 

Boston, New Haven, 
Albany, Portland! 



EST 

Los Angeles, Denver, 
Seattle, Salt Lake City! 



OUTH 

Atlanta, New Orleans, 
Miami, Richmond! 



Have your local ITC represen- 
tative give you the news of how 
BRAVE STALLION can in- 
crease audiences in your market. 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



488 Madison Ave. • N.Y. 22 * PLaza 5-2100 

22 



Timebuyers 
at work 



"**W 



Lucille Braumiller, media director. Sander Allen Advertisiq 
Chicago, which buys for Velsicol Chemical's agricultural insecticidi 
feels that farm stations radically switching to pop music formats mi 
lose their audience for farm products. "The living patterns of t 
farmer have changed in the last 10 years, and he has become mo 
urbanized as his standard of living 
has risen," Lucille points out. "But 
this urbanization is only on the sur- 
face. Basically, the farmer still re- 
mains a product of his own highly 
specialized way of life. Successful 
farm selling must, therefore, be 
geared to these interests." Because 
the farmer has been raised on 
country and western music, Lucille 
thinks that stations seeking both 
rural and urban audiences should 
balance their programing accord- 
ingly. "I feel that a common music ground can be found. But a stri 
Top 40 policy for these stations cannot hold the farmer. It is 
feasible if it is modified considerably, and slanted to his tast 
The farm audience still remains too large for stations to ignore 



Norm Allen, Mohr & Eicoff, Inc., New York, thinks that of partici 
lar interest to stations and advertisers is a study of listenership habij 
of women (by age groups I to music programing, by Patrick E. Weld 
at Ohio State University. "The survey was based on 2,168 person! 
interviews of girls and women over 14 years of age at a time whe 

many stations were changing j 
teenage-directed music formatsi 
Norm notes. "It showed that til 
tiniest share of the female audient 
throughout the entire day was mac 
up of teenagers, contrary to con 
mon opinion that they represents 
a very substantial share. Even la 
afternoon, when many stations h 
hard with teenage fare, showe 
small teenage listenership. N<w 
points out that during the four t 
six p.m. slots, there were 65 tee 
agers per 1,000 homes as against 245 women in the 31-45 grou. 
Young, single and married women were also negligible. The oldi' 
groups outnumbered those under 30 by large margins at all hours < 
the day. "If this sample is accurate," Norm says, "many stations ha> 
been programing under a misconception as to audience character 




SPONSOR 



• 18 july 195 



:■■'■''.-■ 



hKHSS 



BE* 








Four hundred forty-eight thousand and one! 



Change your records and let there be sounds of 
rejoicing along Madison, Michigan and other 
avenues of enlightenment. Another tv family just 
moved into our 58-county area. 

That makes it 448,001, some of whom are left 
handed, some right handed, and some ambidex- 
trous. 

Whether they use (a) the left or (b) the right hand 
to tune to channel 10, they tunc to channel 10. 



NCS No. 3 shows us No. 1 daily and weekly, day- 
time and nighttime, in Roanoke. WSLS-TV 
reaches more homes than any other station in 
the greater Roanoke market. Blair Television 
Associates will take it from there. 



WSLS-TV 



Channel 10 • NBC Television 

Mail Address: Roanoke, Va. 
A broadcast service (with WSLS Radio) 
of Shenandoah Life Insurance Company 



mm 

Hi 

JSffi 




. 



WDBJ-TV 

Evening schedule 

tf CH 9-15 1959 





,-. C6S «<XJ«AM*W*B 


FRIDAY 


SATWtOAT SUNDAY 


„.£f*C£ 


TARGET 


c t 0** 






THE PGW COLONEL SAYS: 

"Some of our most profitable 
presentations are made to 

the stations we represent. " 

We chart the progress of the stations we work for 
. . . their sales potential and sales, their audience, 
their CPM and their competition . . . because we 
want to know how we are doing, and how we 
can do better. 

They welcome this information and often ask for 
our counsel on their product, their prices and their 
promotion. 

Is this PGW service profitable? We think that 
these stations are in the best position to tell you 
of our work in that area. Don't you? 



P JETERS. 
G BIFFIN 




W OGBWAMX imc. 

Pioneer Station Representatives Since 1932 

NEW YORK CHICAGO DETROIT HOLLYWOOD 

ATLANTA DALLAS FT. WORTH SAN FRANCISCO 



WSBT-TV 



49th a 




"HOOSIER FAVORITE"... 

The Teenagers Show That Parents Watch 



With Joe Kelly and Bruce Saunders at the helm of "Hoosier 
Favorite," WSBT-TV's big production studio really "jumps" on Satur- 
day afternoons. From 5:00-6:30 p.m. South Bend teenagers crowd 
the studio and their home TV sets for dancing fun, top tunes and 
the casual commentaries of Saunders and Kelly. 

While "Hoosier Favorite" is essentially a teenagers show, ARB 
reports that half of this big audience is composed of adults! Now in 
its 5th year, this popular program consistently rates above 20.0%. 

WSBT-TV dominates the prosperous South Bend market with 
local programs and by carrying top rated national shows. The latest 
ARB rating gives WSBT-TV 45.2 share of sets in use over a four week 
period! 

To reach the 1 .6 billion dollar South Bend TV market, use the 
station that dominates it nearly 2 to 1 ... WSBT-TV. See your Ray- 
mer man or write this station for availabilities on "Hoosier Favorite." 
Also request free market data book. 




SOUTH BEND, INDIANA 

ASK PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY « 



26 



> CHANNEL 22 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVF 



Madisc 



Wrong word 

Your June 20th article on tv's t 
four in cleaners ("Can They Upi 
the Champ?") misstates the 
when it reports that Lestoil "uses 
only in live action minutes." And 
omits another pertinent fact when 
draws attention to the singular p< 
sonalities of Mr. Clean and Han 
Andy as major selling features. 

Lestoil does use animated spo 
produced by our company during t 
past year and a half, as a maj 
aspect of its advertising progra: 
Aside from their recent victory 
the Cannes International Advertisii 
Film Festival, these commercials ha 
attracted considerable praise with 
the industry and among the viewiii 
public. And, without arguing t 
relative merits of its rivals' conimi; 
cial personalities, certainly the figii 
of "Dirt," before and after, featur 
in the Lestoil spots, is one of the mo 
winning characterizations on the s\ 
today. 

Peter Cooper 

exec. v.p. 

Robert, Lawrence Animatu 

New York 

• Our mistake; we intended to say "pj 
marily." 

'Freeloader' fan 

Your fine publication has render/ 
many services to our industry as w<t 
as to those that use radio/tv — bjj 
another star was added as a result 
your 27 June issue in the story "De 
Miss Freeloader." 

I have known Ben Ludy for mat 
years — Ben taught me radio — 
always practiced what is outlined 
this article. It is natural that I su 
scribe to the practice and follow it 
the letter. You can not merchandi 
goods you are not stocking on yoi 
own shelves. The sooner the frej 
loaders learn it the better off th( 
will be. 

Considerable client funds — that 
presume come from the advertisii 






SPONSOR 



18 JULY 19? 



count- are wasted. Much paper, 
ik. postage and what-not would be 
i\fd if the stupid practice was 
opped. It would make our janitor 
lot happier, too, as every bit of it 
ts file 13. 

1 hope th is article in \our good 
Bgazine will make some of them 
up and think. 

Ed McKernan 

gen. mgr. 

KVOE 

Emporia, Kans. 



col tv special a smash! 
e took your advice about local spe- 
lls l."Wh\ not local tv specials?" 
iinsor, 30 May), and whipped up 

lie of our own. On Thursday eve- 
ag, 25 June. KING-TV replaced its 
gular programs with Lost Cargo, 
90-minute report to our viewers on 
e waterfront crisis faced by the port 

ties of Puget Sound. This was a 
list" for local tv in the Pacific 
>rthwest. and will lie followed by 
-lies of KING-TV periodic "spe- 

Uthough Lost Cargo was in the 
ils over four months prior to your 
ovocative editorial, the extremely 
gorous and favorable reactions to 
clearl) point up the soundness of 
ur editorial position. 

Otto Brandt 

v.p. 

KING-TV 

Seattle 

1st growing fm 

<■ would like to congratulate you on 
excellent coverage of fm radio 
m'ii in the article written in the 13 
. tie issue. 

Representing, as we do, seventeen 
i the Lnited States and one Cana- 
fen I m station, we naturally are 
jeatl) interested in anything that 
- this fast growing medium to 
I ' attention of the advertisers. 

I here is no doubt in our minds 

I I acceptance of fm radio is becom- 
\ more widespread. 

\l"iig Madison Ave., agencies who 
'• listened to our story with a 
kigue-in -cheek attitude a year ago 
e now seriously compiling informa- 
"i for client presentation. Every 
lication points to a continuous up- 
rge in business this fall. 

Joel B. Fairfax 

v.p., dir. of sales 

Fine Music Hi-Fi Bdcstrs, Inc. 

New York 




rasTeST qui? in me south 

Fastest . . . and speaks with most authority in these parts, 
podner. 

Small wonder we're sittin' tall in the saddle. WBT's varied, 
creative, responsible programming guns down the opposition 
by 92% mornings, 69% afternoons and 123% at night.* 

Nielsen says our spread is the nation's 24th largest.** Let us 
put our brand on your radio schedule. Call CBS Radio Spot 
Sales for the low-down. 

Pulse 25 county area 1959 (March) 
**A. C. Nielsen Co. 

WBT CHaPlPTTe 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 
JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



0\S()K 



18 july 1959 



27 







SJURES 

But they've been warned^y^tlieir Mothers, 
to stay off Madison Avenue! ^^•^ 

Seriously, this picture is merely to show that 
our farm families of today, here in the Land 
of Milk and Money, look and act just like 
their City Cousins . . . except the fam 
of course, has more ntoney. 
Eye our market: 42% rural and 58% urban 
. . . more than 1,350,000 folks spending, 
$1,750,000,000 in retail sales yearly . . % 
over 400,000 families enjoying Channef 
2-CBS Television. 

Makes a pretty picture, doesn't it ? 



I 










Bfi^j«s^' 




< 




MENOMINEE 
MARINETTE 



WAUSAU 

OCON1 

STEVENS PT. 
WIS. RAPIDS 




i -I'M 
W ISCONSlN / 

' APPLETON \ y 

SHKOSH ~ M * S *TOWOC 

{ ! 

"DDULAC — S^BOYGAN 
WEST BEND | 







THE LAND 
OF MILK 
ANDJ|)NEY 
WBAY ch. 2 
GREEN BAY 



HAYDN R. EVANS, GEN. MGR. 



28 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 11)9 



^ SPONSOR 

18 | U L Y 19 5 9 



TV IS 



OC K lN<* 
WITH 




ELVIS PRESLEY, pegged for ABC TV special. 
typifies name-star gate appeal all networks look for 



•OLD RUSH ON FOR FALL '59 AS NETS SLATE 270 SPECIALS 
VHICH WILL COST SPONSORS A STAGGERING $87 MILLION 

National advertisers will spend an estimated $87 nets have already scheduled 270 specials for the 

illion this next tv season on program phenomena fall "59 season with 192 in the works. 
wwn as "specials" — the blockbuster, star-studded This is about five times the number telecast la>t 

ows which carry price tags as high as $650,000. year. These 270 specials, now blueprinted at 

etworks, packagers and talent are all rustling to mid-summer, represent seven specials a week for 

t their share of this enormous rich pie. For the peak-season viewing during the upcoming 39-week 



0NSOR 



18 jilv iav) 



29 



season. This means the nation's view- 
ers will have much bigger lures pull- 
ing them from regularly scheduled 
programing, and that advertisers will 
"go for broke" to snag the 40 to 50 
million audience one tv special nets. 
Specials will also be more special 
than ever before. The name, a mis- 
nomer, has heretofore applied fre- 
quently ( and in some cases still does) 
to programs which could not legiti- 



larly scheduled and independent of 
any preceding or following show 
which may be aired in the same 
series. 

At presstime. sponsor tabbed these 
net estimates as to the number of 
specials now on the books to be tele- 
cast next season: ABC. 22; CBS, 97: 
NBC, 73. But NBC has by far the 
lead in blueprinting specials: it will 
telecast 155 specials in the 39-week 



Plllllllllllllllllll!llll!!lllllllllllllll!lllllllllllllllllillllllllllllll!llll ll!lllllllllllllllllllll!ll!!lllllllllllllllllllllllll]l]lillli:M Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



FALL FACT SHEET ON SPECIALS 



* 



ABC TV CBS TV NBC TV TOTAL 



NO. OF SPECIALS 1 


22 


97 


73 


192 


NO, OF CLIENTS 


8 


10 


15 


33 



TYPE OF SHOWS 



DRAMATIC 


2 


48 


16 


66 


MUSIC-VARIETY 


15 


14 


27 


56 


COMEDY 





29 


12 


41 


NEWS, SPEC. EVENTS 





6 


6 


12 


DOCUMENTARY 


1 





9 


10 


SCIENCE 


3 





3 


6 



SPORTS 



* All information as of 7 July, compiled by SPONSOR from information supplied by the three 
networks. 

1 Refers to total number of separate programs and only to those specifically scheduled as of 
7 July. NBC TV. for example, plans to air 155 specials next season but only 7:j have been 
formalized ami are slotted. 

2 Advertisers who have signed for shows as of 7 July. Thirty different advertisers have con- 
tracted for fall shmvs, with Tiuu-x. General Mills and Buick scheduled for two-network showings. 

;t Analysis refers to all firmly scheduled programs for next season. 



.-1li;/!i,:::'i .,: ■!!,.!: ,ll!i: Jll' ii!!,ii .ill :!l ili! jr !ii:,,j: ,!;:,h .11 - l!|i|!ll!llli!l!llllll!i|l!lllll!lJlllllll!!!lll!ll Illlllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



mately be called — specials. The nets 
continue to bicker with each other as 
to the exact definition of a "special." 
CBS TV has the most formalized de- 
scription, but one which other net- 
works claim CBS TV doesn't live up 
to in its own programing. The CBS 
special: "A particular program of 
unusual scope, continuity and interest 
which is not presented as a part of 
the network's every week program 
fare." Thus a special must be irregu- 

30 



season and is the only network to 
have set aside specific regular time 
periods. Normally time clearances for 
specials have been provided by a con- 
tract clause with regular program ad- 
vertisers stipulating that two of their 
slots can be pre-empted for specials 
during the course of the year. This 
system still holds true for ABC and 
CBS. 

But the NBC plan goes farther. It 
clears every Sunday night from 8 to 



9, Fridays from 8:30 to 9:30 ai 
Tuesdays from 9:30 to 10:30, e* 
for 39 weeks (in some cases, pr 
vision has been made for 90-minu 
segments rather than the hour 
addition. NBC has withheld time fro 
regular contract schedules for 
shows, adding up to its planned tol 
of 155 shows. 

ABC's specials philosophy st 
gives the heaviest weight to musice 
and music-variety formats. Its fii 
straight dramatic fare to date will 
runs of MGM motion pictures, whi 
are being offered by the packager 
all of the networks on an exclusi 
basis this coming season. 

CBS is working for a balance h 
tween its hrst-line regular progra 
fare and its second-line special show 
Each schedule — the regular and tl 
special — is designed to compleme 
the other, as a CBS TV spokesmi 
says. "In the first case, we'll prese 
the excitement every week of favor: 
faces and popular stories, and in ti 
second we'll introduce new faces ai 
properties. This year our special 
will be doubled in number." At th 
stage of fall and winter planni 
CBS has 97 specials on the books 
may well go as high as 130. It 
heavy-up on the news and speci 
event classification and feature i 
elaborate news-gathering teams in 
series of six as a season starter. 

Advertisers this fall will see t 
same amounts of money as on pri 
tags last year, even though costs a 
rising. Specials can cost as little ; 
$100,000 for talent and products 
and range as high as $500,000. T: 
norm is $200,000, to which an adc 
tional average of $120,000 should 1 
added for time. Of this $200,01 
between $50,000 and $75,000 co 
below-the-line costs — production. 1 
cilities. etc. The above-the-line cos 
— $125,000 — pay the creative peo] 
and performers on the show, covj 
rights and purchase of the proper! 

Contracts for each special van. i 
pending on the program source I n 
work, packager, independent prodi 
tion company, the star ) and the ne 
of the sponsor. Some buyers wa 
only a one-time shot, others may wa 
re-run rights for which they th 
contract to pay extra before their d 
tion on re-runs expires. 

The biggest cost factor on the ri 
in the opinion of Thomas Moore, v]' 
{Please turn to page 69) 






SPONSOR 



18 JULY 19!' 



IJIUIIIIIlllllllllil I Illilllll lll[!!l!!lilllll!lli!l!lllll!!IIUI!!!llllll!lil!ll[ll!llill!llllillllllllll!lll^ Illllllll! 



SPECIALS SCHEDULED BY NETS FOR NEXT FALL 



* 



PROGRAM 



NUMBER 
IN SERIES 



ABC TV 



SPONSORS 



TIME UF SETi 



MGM MOVIES 2 

DISNEY PRESENTATIONS 3 

SHIRLEY TEMPLE'S 

STORYBOOK 5 

RING CROSBY SHOW 2 

PAT ROONE SHOW 1 

FRANK SINATRA SHOW 4 

THE GOLDEN CIRCLE 1 

ART CARNEY MEETS PETER 

AND THE WOLF 1 

CROSRY GOLF TOURNEY 1 

THE SPLENDID AMERICAN 1 

ELVIS PRESLEY SHOW 1 



G en rral Mills 
Mars Candy . 
Breck - 



Oldsmobile 
Chevrolet 
U. S. Time 
Oster Mfg. 



Minnesota Mining 
Olilsmobile 



Feb., March 

Fri., 7:30-8:30, 9/11, 9/18, 9/25 

Mon., 7:30-8:30, 9 28, 10 19, 11/9, 

11/30, 12/21 
9/29, probably next spring 
10/8, 9-ljO 

10/19, prob. Nov., Dec, Feb. 
11/25, 10-11 

11/29, 5-6 

I, 24 

Prob. Sept. 

Prob. Feb. or March 



CBS TV- 



VARIED PROGRAMING 20 

HEMINGWAY STORIES 4 

SHOW OF THE MONTH 9 

PLAYHOUSE 90 20 



PHIL SILVERS 4 

JACK BENNY 3 

FACE OF OUR TIME 6 

MGM MOVIES 3 

DESILU PLAYHOUSE 10 

DESI AND LUCY 5 

JACKIE GLEASON 4 

SID CAESAR 5 



Reilon 


15 on Thurs., 9:30-11; 5, 60-min. 


Buick 


Thurs., 9:30-11, 11/19 start 


DuPont .. 


90 minutes, 9 28, 10 14, II 9, 12/4 




1/17, 2/11, 3/5, 4,7, 5 3 


Allstate Insurance 


Thurs., 9:30-1 1 


American Gas Assn. .... 




R. J. Reynolds 




Curling's Ale 


- 




60-min. 


Bell & Howell ... 


60-min. 


Benrus Watches 


Starts 12 13 


Whitman Candies 





60-min. 



NBC TV. 






ART CARNEY 8 

BELL TELEPHONE HOUR 12 

RELL SCIENCE SERIES 3 

BOB HOPE SHOW 6 

PONTIAC STAR PARADE 8 

SUNDAY SHOWCASE 39 

HALL OF FAME 6 

VARIED PROGRAMING 2 

OSCAR AWARDS 1 

EMMY AWARDS 1 

MUSIC-DAMA 6 

DRUG CONVENTION 1 

JIMMY DURANTE 2 

MILTON BERLE 2 

PROJECT 20 3 

As of 7 July as reported by the networks. 



AC Spark Plugs 

United Motors .. 

Bell Telephone 

Bell Telephone . 

Buick 

f'ontiac 



Hallmark 

Brewers Foundation 
Acad. Ti Arts. Sciences 

Rexall 

U. S. Time 

Zerex (DuPont) . 

Zerex (DuPont) 



60-, 90-min., 10 2, II, 12/4, 1/8. 

2/5, 3 4, 4 1,5 6 
Fri., alt. wks from 10 9, 60-min. 

60-min. starting Oct. 

60-min. 12/10, 3/18, 5 11, others 

Sun., 8-9 

90-min. starting mid-Oct. 

Fall, June 



Sun. 8-9, 10-11 
I I I I 






'ON^OR • 18 JULY 1959 



31 



THE 
WORLD'S 




CAPRI in January: While 

cast shivers in bikinis, camera 

fan Manilla keeps warm 



OASIS crew was first commercial 

film group permitted to 

shoot in famed Villa San Michele 



FOR 
OASIS 



32 




From the French Riviera to 

Waikiki Beach goes Mc-E's Jim 

Manilla to scout locations and 
film those exotic Oasis 

Cigarette commercials for tv 



■u. 


t 


■ J U 1 









CARABINIERI of Italy pose at Posi Mi po 

near Naples for Oasis commercial. But hats weren't right 




ON THE DOCK at Golfe Juan, the spot where Napoleon landed after exile, Paris talent Sophie Moranvillisrs, Claude Serre do scene 



I he pictures on this spread and the following 
page, for the benefit of those admen who are 
camera fans, were taken on regular film with an 
//2.8 Rolleiflex. The photographer — except for 
the one pic where he himself was snapped by a 
member of his cast — is James N. Manilla, film 
group head at McCann-Erickson in N.Y. Many 
01 (he scenes and the subjects will strike a fa- 
miliar chord, and with good reason: they are 
from a -cries of on-location commercials (aired 



since last November) for Oasis Cigarettes. 
Long before he came to Mc-E five years ago. 
Manilla worked at Eastman Kodak in Roches- 
ter, taught himself photography. I Eastman sup- 
plied cameras, film and processing free to all 
in their advertising department.) Vi hat began 
as a hobby now takes Manilla on world-wide tv 
filming junkets; since last fall, he has filmed 
the Oasis series in Montego Bay, Florida. \< :a- 
pulco, Waikiki. the Riviera, Naples, Capri 



SPONSOR 



L8 july 1959 



33 



MAKE-UP for Sophie 
Moranvilliers by 
macieuse before filming at 
Eden Roc. (Below) spectator 
in square on Capri poses for 
shot at request of Manilla 









OWNER of villa (above) at Eze, on Riviera, allowed Manilla and crew 

in to shoot pix. Back in U. S. (below) at Cypress Gardens, Fla., final take of Oasis 

commercial is shot. Man on camera is Mike Elliot, of Elliot, Unger & Elliot 




and Puerto Rico. This fall will prol 
ably see him shooting more Oasi 
commercials in far-flung places. H 
picked and flew his talent from sue! 
centers as New York, Hollywood 
Paris and Rome; used the productioi 
facilities and camera artists froj 
Arco Productions and Elliot, t nge 
& Elliot. For the commercials. Oasi 
might have used stock film as back 
grounds or gone on stage sets. Stoci 
shots, Manilla decided, wouldn't pei 
mit control, but he had not closed hi 
mind to shooting on sets when h 
filmed one commercial in Montegi 
Bay. Jamaica and another in Florida' 
Cypress Gardens. He took these t 
prints to Hollywood, showed them 
the top studios, asked if they cofl 
duplicate at same price and qualit 
on set, was told with remarkabl 
frankness by each to go on with loca 
tion shooting because they couldn 
compete. 

Commercials were shot as minutes 
whittled down into extra commercial 
of 45- and 20-second lengths. Anotfl 
bonus of the shooting is that the 
picked up stills which have since bee: 
used in print media campaign. Souni 
tracks were added after filming, tie. 
always to the scene. So the familia 
Oasis jingle has come out with man 
variations — a hula rhythm with Hf 
waiian guitars accompanies the Wa 
kiki commercial, claves click th 
rhythm of the Acapulco film, stee 
drums beat through the Jamaica se 
quence. 

Casting was the biggest problen 
and no crew stirred until that wa 
done. When a setting was decidec 
Jim Manilla flew off three days ahea 
of crew and talent to scout exact loca 
tion. Actual shooting spanned aboi: 
three days. In all of the film safarif 
only two were complicated by rain- 
in Capri and Montego Bay. Capil 
also was very cold in January, so thi 
bathing suit-clad stars kept swaddle 
in heavy wraps until the raomei: 
"Action" was called; after each take 
dived back into woolies. Only "iij 
ternational incident" occurred a 
Naples when Italian officials discox 
ered their carabinieri had wor 
wrong hats during filming of on 
commercial. 

A great champion of on-locatio 
filming, Manilla also does, for Mc-E 
the Chesterfield "Men of America! 
series of tv commercials. ^ 



. 




TAPING CHALLENGE to d.j.'s are (I to r) Bristol-Myers' product mgr. John Eastman, BBDO media buyer Ed Koehler, a.e. John Leonard 






BRISTOL-MYERS 

HURLS CHALLENGE 
AT RADIO'S D.J.'S 



"Here's a ehance to prove you can outsell tv," says 
company to d.j.'s in switch from net tv to spot radio 

^ D.j. contest, with B-M salesmen as judges, uses fact 
sheet to promote all-out effort, form stronger trade ties 



I his week Bristol-Myers, in behalf 
of its Trig deodorant, is throwing a 
challenge squarely at 180 radio sta- 
tions. This is what d.j.'s, station man- 
agers and program directors heard 
on a tape recorded by Bristol-Myers 
admen : 

"Here's your big chance to prove 



\ou can outsell t\ . We're switching 
Trig's budget from network 1\ into 
spot radio because we know you can 
do it. This isn't blind faith. We've 
tested it. and as a result, we're tin ow- 
ing the lion's share of our budget be- 
hind spot radio."' 

Behind this challenge lies a strate- 



SPONSOR 



18 JUL? 1959 



gy switch by Bristol-Myers and 
BBDO: who are diverting the ma- 
jority of Trig's over $1 million an- 
nual budget I by SPONSOR estimate I 
into morning radio. Ed Koehler. 
BBDO media buyer, sums up the 
reasons for the switch: "We wanted 
to reach men when the) are grooming 
and most apt to be in the mood for 
deodorant advice. The wa\ to do tlii- 
is to utilize spot radio to the fullest." 

Then, in the waj that am major 
compan) handles its sales personnel. 
Bristol-Myers decided to paj the 
d.j.'s a bonus. But it's a bonus based 
strict!) on performance. Specifically, 
the handling of a fact sheet. 

The judges: Bristol-Myers sales- 
men. First, each makes his own d.j. 
selection in his market i there are 15 
radio markets in all i . The results 
will be polled, and a panel chosen bj 
SKA will narrow the field down to 
the single national winner and 10 
runners-up. 

The prizes: $500 to the winner, 
$100 each to the next 10. 

As the tape made bj BBDO and 
Bristol-Myers admen emphasizes, the 



35 




CHECKED AGAINST FACT SHEETS, d.j. improvisations are analyzed for pertinence to 
campaign theme by (l-r) product mgr. John Eastman, adv. coordinator Roger Whitman, v. p. 
Don S. Frost. Tapes of d.j.'s choice will be used in national judging by SRA-selected panel 





LOCAL CONTEST CRITICS are B-M salesmen in 45 radio markets, like Bill Huron in Cleve- 
land (at left), who twists dial to catch d.j.'s while shaving. Involving buyer in choice is part of 
strategy. At right, Pittsburgh salesman Ray Burrows (I) checks his choice with Sun Drug v. p. 
Harold Perry. Method of buying (by BBDO's Ed Koehler, below) was also part of strategy 




spot radio approach for Trig was 
tested before the full-scale push be- 
gan this summer I a six-week flight 
to be repeated in September). 

First experiment was a four-week 
spot radio flight conducted in 40 mar- 
kets. "A minimum schedule was 
mounted," says account executive 
John Leonard, "to test the effective- 
ness of e.t.'s as a selling approach in 
the morning hours, also the effect of 
spot radio and spot tv in combina- 
tion. 

"We found very early," he says, 
"that it was very difficult to get our 
full message over in less than a min- 
ute. Since we couldn't secure any 
minute availabilities in prime time, 
we dropped spot tv entirely and 
studied the effect of radio alone. 

"Our plan here was the one we 
eventually settled on: 6:30-8:30 a.m. 
minutes, in and adjacent to news- 
weather-sports programs, simply be- 
cause BBDO research has shown a 
43% male preference for this type of 
programing against a 16% preference! 
for music. 

"Results indicated we were on the 
right track as far as frequency wasl 
concerned, but where we felt we were 
losing out was in the added impact 
we could get from the enthusiasm a| 
personal pitch by the d.j.'s would give 
us, plus the added interest and proJ 
motional advantages such enthusiasm 
could stir up." 

While the 40-market flight was 
still in progress, two markets (Bos J 
ton and Providence) were singled oul 
as a proving ground for an e.t. vs 
fact sheet approach, as well as uhai 
could be done with d.j.'s merchan| 
dising their own Trig schedules. 

At first, a 52-week test was planned 
Later, it was decided to duplicate the 
conditions of a 52-week test by coni 
densing it into 13. Early mornim 
schedules on five stations in Bostoi 
and four in Providence ran to ap 
proximately 45 minutes per week 
"Our aim," savs media buver Koeh 
ler. "was to obtain 60-70 r r marke 
r-enetration funduplicated homes) ii 
Boston and Providence. To approxi 
mate the effect of a national magazin 
umbrella for the test, we bough 
schedules in Sunday supplements-; 



SPONSOR 



13 july 195' 



illoting one-third of the budget to 
his, the balance to spot radio." 

The d.j.'s in each city were called 
>n and given fact sheets to work from 
,vith carte blanche to come up with 
m\ ideas of their own that would 
idd color to the copy points. Station 
ind program managers were asked 
ii get behind the schedules with ad- 
litional support at other times of 
lay. 

Says account executive Leonard. 
'W e found that it is not unreason- 
ible to ask for additional on-the-air 
fupport if there is a strong enough 
gimmick to hang it on — one that will 
increase listening interest for the sta- 
ton. We felt we had that in the 15- 
econd progressive jazz lead-in to 
he live commercial. One idea that 
\orked well was playing of the theme 
it other times of the day and offering 
irizes to the first persons identifying 
|t. Prizes were packages of Trig. 
The device did not involve mention- 
Dg I he product at all except in the 
egular schedule." 

Another test point was the per- 

"iial influence of the d.j. in selling 

chain buyers and rack jobbers. "This 

proved to be tremendous," says 

3ristol-Myers product manager John 

Eastman, "and it became obvious 

liat Mime device for forming a rela- 

ionship between the d.j. and the 

inver must be built into the full scale 

adio campaign which by now it was 

airly certain we'd be conducting." 

To clinch the matter, results of a 
ix-week brand awareness test by C. 
E. Hooper in Boston revealed: 

(1) Awareness of Trig as a man's 
leodorant increased approximately 
16' i during the period. 

i 2 I Knowledge of Trig advertis- 
ing as shown by the ability to recall 
t increased 109' , . 

In addition, usage of Trig almost 
loubled in the Boston market in the 
tame period. 

The stage was clearly set for an 
(ill-out radio campaign. Koehler and 
3BDO associate media director Herb 
Vlaneloveg had about two weeks to 
jine up 180 stations in 45 markets 
I 1 five were added to the original 40). 
'"^elections were made on the number 
ll'lea.se turn to page 71 "I 





HOW BBDO BUYS RADIO FOR TRIG 

1 PENETRATION VS. RATING POINTS. Rather than 
equalize rating points, BBDO prefers to equalize unduplicat- 
ed audience. For example, 100 rating points in New York 
would only reach 30% of the market, as compared to 40- 
50% in less competitive markets. 



2 VARIATIONS IN MARKETS. Because percent of mar- 
ket was the goal, buying took market variations into account. 
Examples from NCS #2 showed : unduplicated daytime week- 
ly metro area circulation of top 3 Atlanta stations, 77-56- 
55%; New York, 33-27-26%. Therefore, six stations were needed 
in N.Y. and L.A. — with other markets ranging between 3 and 5. 
Frequencies range from 30 minutes per week in large markets to 
20 per week in smaller markets. 



3 OUTER COVERAGE. Only one station in each of the top 
50 markets will reach as much as 30% of the outer area each 
week, BBDO finds. And while the degree of metro penetra- 
tion for the next 3 or 4 stations is close {average, 35%), 
their outer coverage drops off sharply {by over 75% I of their 
metro audiences. Therefore, certain stations are used for good 
coverage outside, while extra ones are added for saturation inside. 



MALE LISTENING PREFERENCES. Time in and ad- 
jacent to news-weather-sports were bought in 6:30-8:30 a.m. 
time periods. BBDO has found that males prefer news by 
43%, music by 16 c < . Female preference for news is 33%. 



5 MALE LISTENING HABITS. Here's BBDO's 6-9 a.m. 
listening breakdoivn: 27' < men. 47% women, 13% teens, 
13% children. No other daytime listening period exceeds 
21% male audience. Agency also finds 60 % out-of-home 
listening is in cars where men make up 75% of all adults reached. 



6COST-PER-1,000. Trig's switch to spot radio was de- 
signed to 1 1) substitute frequency jar the reach of tv. (2) 
isolate a male audience. While CPM was secondary, BBDO 
also took the following general ranges into account: spot 
radio minutes, $.75-1.50; spot tv (prime 2ffs), $1.75-2.50; net' 
ivork tv \evening minutes. v <- 1 












SPONSOR 



18 JULY 1959 



37 




TAPED TO SELL: Today af Home, WBZ-TV Boston show, is taped for showing to N.Y. admen. The tape joins library of 100 others at TvAR 



^ A $60,000 salesman who never leaves the office is 
star attraction at TvAR, Inc., new rep firm for WBC 

W This tv tape equipment allows admen to view a Boston 
personality in N.Y.C., pre-test Baltimore commercial 



\J\\ 1 July. Television Advertising 
Representatives opened its doors, 
nailed down its first chunk of busi- 
ness — about $250,000 worth. 

Clincher on the deal — a two-inch 
wide plastic ribbon called video tape. 

Here's the story behind that first 
sale and of the unique role that tv 
tape played in it. 

When TvAR was incorporated and 
Larry Israel, then manager of WJZ- 
TV in Baltimore, was brought in to 
head it up as vice president and gen- 
eral manager, just about the first 



suggestion he made was, "Let's get 
tape." 

About $62,000 was invested in the 
installation of an Ampex Videotape 
recorder at the firm's New York head- 
quarters, and TvAR has become the 
first station representative firm to 
put tv tape to work as a salesman. 

TvAR represents five Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. stations: KYW-TV, 
Cleveland; WBZ-TV. Boston; KDKA- 
TV. Pittsburgh, WJZ-TV, Baltimore, 
and KPIX, San Francisco. The latter 
outlet had been running a 15-minute 



evening strip of news and sports with 
Colgate as sponsor. When Colgate 
exited, KPIX decided to re-evaluate 
the show, found it would break neatly 
into two programs — Channel 5 News 
from 7 to 7:10 p.m. and Russ Hudv.es 
Sportcast from 7:10 to 7:15. They 
put them both on tape for the use of 
TvAR (All of the WBC tv stations 
are equipped with tape. WJZ-TV has 
two recorders; each of the others 
presently has one, is awaiting de- 
liveries of seconds. ) 

So when the rep firm began busi- 
ness, it had tapes of the two KPIX 
shows for New York advertising 
agencies. JWT bought the Russ 
Hodges Sportcast for client Pan 
American World Airways on a five- 
a-week, 52-week basis. At the same 
time B&B. for General Foods product 
Yuban Coffee, and D-F-S, for Falstaff 
Beer, bought the Channel 5 News 
package also on a five-a-week basis. 



SPONSOR o 18 JULY 1959 




SOMETHING NEW: A steady stream of admen have visited rep 
firm since I July. Left: Gordon Dewart, of Ted Bates media, gets 
tape demonstration from TvAR eastern sales mgr. Jack Mohler (I) and 
Larry Israel, v. p. and gen. mgr. TvAR. Above: Israel explains to Nancy 
Smith, JWT buyer on Pan Am account. Looking on are (I to r) John 
Stilli, TvAR; Norm Varney, local live tv head for JWT, and Arnold 
Chase, also of JWT local live tv dept. The airline made a 52-week buy 



"Our use of tv tape." says Larry 
Israel, "is one manifestation of 
TvAR's determination to bring an 
entirely new dimension of service and 
information through greater sales 
proximity and marketing orientation 
to station representation. New \ ork 
advertisers and agencies are offered 
a 'monitor in Manhattan, enabling 
them to see local programs and per- 
sonalities across the country. 

\t the present time. TvAR has a 
taped librai) of more than 100 pro- 
grams collected from the five WBC 
outlets, is adding to this librarj daily. 
In time it will include not only the 
lop local shows and personalities, but 
1 \'i \ salable piece of local talent such 
as chain break announcers and pic- 
tures ol those who do voice-overs at 
the individual stations. 

If an agency requests it. they will 
In- able to see at the TvAR head- 
quarters a tape of the competitive 



program in a market; to evaluate it 
against the WBC buy they may be 
considering. 

Since the opening of the rep firm 
in New York, the Ampex has been 
working about six to eight hours a 
day. Much of this running time has 
been devoted to showing programing 
product to ad managers of client com- 
panies and their agencymen. But 
some of the time has been spent in 
demonstrations for agenc\ copy peo- 
ple as well as for the staff of TvAR 
itself. (At TvAR. which employs 
about 70 people in all its branches 
with about 15 at headquarters alone, 
nobody is simply a secretan or file 
clerk. In the case of the female em- 
ployee, each girl is a "Gal Friday," 
schooled in sales or research. I The 
T\ \l! concept for using tv tape is 
that evervone screens the out-of-town 
product. So the tape recorder has 
many by-product uses. 



For one thing, it enables the rep 
firm to keep its own staff posted on 
the latest programing developments 
at each station without traveling its 
personnel. 

Another big bonus of the tape 
equipment, is the opportunih it gi\es 
agencx buyers and copywriters to pic- 
test their commercials and custom 
tailor them for the WBC markets. If 
an agency exec is especially taken bv 
the performance of a certain person- 
ality in Cleveland, for example, he 
may prepare special cop} and ask 
that a particular artist do a trial run 
on it. then send il on to New ^ ork 
for a \ iewing. 

Here is the wa\ il works: 

If an agenc) is interested in a par- 
ticular show in a certain W \'A mar- 
ket (or all of them I he will be able 
to phone TvAR for an appointment, 
see the tapes the same day. 

(Please turn to page THi 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1950 






Spot tv wins new $300,000 camera 



^ Eastman, Polaroid have blazed $5 million trails; 
Bell & Howell, Ansco, G.E. flash bulbs, are following 

^ Here are the mechanics of latest buy— a $300,000 
four-market sweep by Revere— why it'll be even bigger 



I he beckoning glance from the 
young lady in the tv commercial still 
below, shows why camera manufactur- 
ers are flocking to tv. The answer is 
simply — family appeal. 

Latest to join a top-star set of tv 
veterans is Revere Camera Co., Chi- 
cago, which this month winds up a 
10-week spot schedule in four mar- 
kets budgeted at $300,000 (by spon- 
sor estimate I and is now planning an 
all-out push for fall. Other members 
of the group: 

• Eastman Kodak. In network tv 



as alternate sponsor of Ozzie & Har- 
riet since October, 1956, Eastman 
spends $54,000 per show in time costs 
year round. Company now spends 
an additional $125,000 in time costs 
per program as alternate sponsor of 
the Ed Sullivan Show, and spent 
$257,520 in spot tv in 1958, by 
sponsor estimate. (Agency: J. Walter 
Thompson.) 

• Polaroid. While Eastman has 
sought a strictly family audience, Pol- 
aroid has been after identification 
with personalities ever since it was a 



FAMILY APPEAL is prime emphasis of photo supply advertisers, as illustrated in still from 
Revere commercial. Family participation is important, though Dad makes the decision to buy 




charter sponsor on Steve Aliens To- 
night on NBC. Now, its total net- 
work time expenditures of roughly 
$5,500,000 include 50-60 participa- 
tions per year in the Paar show 
(heaviest in spring and pre-Christ- 
masj, two participations per month 
in Como, one per month in Steve 
Allen, plus an NBC Kaleidoscope one- 
time-only last April. (Agency: Doyle 
Dane Bernbach.) 

• Bell & Howell. Unlike Eastman 
and Polaroid, whose profit margin 
comes largely from subsequent sales 
of film after purchase of the camera, 
Bell & Howell entered tv last fall to 
promote its 8 mm. cameras and pro- 
jectors with a four-program NBC TV 
package (a total of 24 participations 
in Ellery Queen, Cimarron City, NBC 
News, Dragnet) budgeted at $450,000 
(see sponsor, 19 April 1958). Com- 
pany came back in spring of '59 with 
twice the strength: $450,000 in a sec- 
ond NBC package (six shots in Cim- 
arron City, 15 in NBC News, and a 
one-time-only, Why Berlin in May) 
plus $450,000 in spot tv in 10 mar- 
kets. Fall plans call for co-sponsor- 
ship of six hour-long news specials 
I three in the fall, three in the spring) 
on CBS TV, budgeted at $45,000 each 
in time costs, by sponsor estimate. 
Spot tv is also planned. (Agency: Mc- 
Cann-Erickson, Chicago.) 

• Ansco. The photographic divi- 
sion of General Aniline got off to 
a slow start in tv last year with a total 
spot expenditure of $3,580, but came 
on strong in April with two partici- 
pations per month on Playhouse 90 
at $70,000 each. Campaign is due to 
continue year round. (Agency: Ben- 
ton & Bowles.) 

• General Electric Flash Bulbs. 
G.E., looking for a natural tie-in for 
its flash bulbs, found it in Man With 
a Camera, which it sponsored alter- 
nately for 13 weeks in the fall and 
spring of '58-'59 over the 26-week 
period the show was on ABC TV. 
Latest report is that it will resume 
sponsorship when the show returns 
in the fall. Estimated time cost last 
season: $570,000. (Grey Adv.) 

Now joining this roster, is the , 
Revere Camera Co. operating on an 
initial budget of roughly $300,000. 

sponsor • 18 july 1959 : 



sponsor 



In joining this compan) of larger 
budget veteran?, Revere analyzed 
what it needed in term? of coverage 
and impact against what it could get 
from tv. Here were the advantages, 
according to Jay P. Herbert, account 
supervisor at Keves. Madden & Jones: 

(1) Maximum impact over a 10- 
week period from a moderate budget. 

i 2 I Concentration in areas of chief 
-ales volume (New York. Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Boston.) 

(3) Frequency when the family 
can bring influence to bear on Dad — 
and vice versa (ideally 6-11 p.m.). 

(4) Demonstration of zoom lens 
in dramatic terms that people were 
already familiar with. i.e. tv tech- 
nique. Ease of operation was another 
important demonstration factor. 

"It is Father who ultimately makes 
t lie economic decision for the camera 
purchase," says Herbert. To get Dad 
while he's under the influence of an- 
other member of the family, prime 
time coverage was desirable. 

Revere got the following frequen- 
cies, mostly in prime time participa- 
tions, for its two one-minute commer- 
cials (one for the movie camera, the 
other for the still) : 
New York 30 per week 

Chicago 30 per week 

Los Angeles 26 per week 

Bo-ton 22 per week 



Total 108 per week 

Revere's station list: 
New York— WABC-TV. WCBS-TV. 

WNEW-TV. WOR-TV 
Chicago— WBBM-TV. WBKB. WGN- 

TV, WNBQ 
Los Angeles— KABC-TV. KNXT. 

KRCA 
Boston — WBZ-TY. Vv HDH-TV. 

WNAC-TV 

A light fringe-time schedule in Los 
Angeles and New York is carrying 
the compan) over the summer hiatus 
while it prepares for its fall push 
(28 September through 13 Decem- 
ber). This will follow the same pat- 
tern of prime time minutes with big- 
ger frequency, the addition of three 
markets (Detroit, Philadelphia. San 
Francisco) and a budget increase 
which will put Revere's tv expendi- 
tures at roughlv half a million. ^ 




EARLY TO RISE: Up and hearing radio at 6 a.m. is Warren Bahr, Y&R associate media 
director, who commutes from South Salem, N.Y. Bahr was one of admen polled by KM&G 

YES, VIRGINIA, 
TIMEBUYERS LISTEN TO RADIO 



I he people who buy radio — when 
do you reach them? 

In the New York environs — urbia 
and exurbia — the very best time is 
7:15 to 7:30 a.m. This was discov- 
ered in a survey by Ketchum, Mac- 
Leod & Grove for the new WBC rep 
firm. Television Advertising Repre- 
sentatives, to determine when the me- 
dia decision-makers in Madison Ave- 
nue agencies could best be reached. 

Masterminding the KM&G survey 
was Max Gibbons, account supervis- 
or. Once he came up with the an- 



swers I See timetable below), George 
\\ atkins. assistant a.e., and John Itta. 
copywriter, went to work on the prep- 
aration of radio spots. 

\~ a result of the survey of tiine- 
buyer listening patterns. KM&G made 
morning spot buys on the \\\K\\ 
Klavan & Finch Show and the WCBS 
Jack Sterling Show to tell mediamen 
about WBC radio. 

Meanwhile housewives (whose hus- 
bands aren't in advertising i wonder 
— what is a timebuyer? ^ 






SPONSOR 



18 jui.y 1959 



Time a.m. 
6:00-6:15 

6:15-6:30 
6:30-6:45 
6:45-7:00 
7:00-7:15 
7:15-7:30 

7:30-7:45 
7:45-8:00 
8:00-8:15 
8:15-8:30 
8:30-8:45 
8:45-9:00 



Timebuyer listening pattern Listening 

Clock radios go into action in Katonah, Greens Farms 5 
and other distant commuting points. 

Things begin to stir in Wilton and Huntington. 6 

Westport, Norwalk and Chappaqua tune in. 17 

It's car radio time in Georgetown and Greens harm*. 23 

Mount I ernon, Forest Hills. Hdboken are awake now. 38 

Manhattan apartment duellers are out of the shower 12 
and listening, at this peak in the adman's radio day. 

The dash for the 7:50 begins ... 35 

. . . but there's another -train at 8:12. so why rushy 31 

Some people even have time for a second cup of coffee. 29 

Vobody s leaving now bat subway commuters. 19 

People who walk to work. 10 
Now we're down to vice presidents, people who live 6 
across the street from the office, and admen who are 
going to be late for coffee break. 



II 




Carl H. Vogt, mdse. mgr., WISN AM-TV 

jrm.dverti.sers, their agencies and 
radio and tv stations, have long shared 
a mutual concern about merchandis- 
ing. How much to ask for? How 
much to give? Is it free or charge- 
able? How much is it really worth in 
terms of making air advertising 
worth more by local-level merchan- 
dising backing? A lot of stations 
have wasted vast sums of money in 
so-called merchandising efforts. Some 
threw it away because their ideas 
were bad; others because inept per- 
sonnel had no real comprehension of 
a client's need; still others because 
they construed promotion to be mer- 
chandising. 

Recently, however, a new practical 
concept of merchandising has devel- 
oped at many leading stations, a con- 
cept based on marketing and sales 
results, rather than on promotional 
values. 

This modern, dollars-and-sense ap- 
proach to radio and tv station mer- 
chandising is outlined here by a mer- 
chandiser who has product marketing 
and chain store experience. Both of 
these are vital factors in any success- 
ful station merchandising plan. The 
expert is Carl H. Vogt, merchandis- 
ing manager of WISN, AM-TV, Mil- 
waukee, who presents a plan which 
provides the services an advertiser 
wants at costs which a station can 
afford to pay. 

Mr. Vogt ivorked nine years with 
the wholesale drug giant, McKesson 
& Robbins, Inc., and two years for 
the F. W . W oolworth Co. in Chicago. 



42 



A DOLLAR- A ND-SENSE 
APPROACH TO RADIO, 
TV MERCHANDISING 1 

^ Station expert outlines a new style of merchandising 
which emphasizes marketing rather than promotion 

^ He advises careful planning and costing, gives 
formula for setting amount of free aid to sponsors 



By Carl H. Vogt 

^S efo re any profit-oriented enter- 
prise indulges in the expense of pro- 
viding an additional merchandising 
service, it must determine: (ll will 
that service be beneficial to its cus- 
tomers? and 12) will profit accrue 
to the organization providing the 
service? 

It's simple to determine the an- 



swer to the first requirement. Mer- 
chandising is a necessary activity of 
all who would sell goods in todav's 
high-speed marketplace and, with the 
advent of self-service, merchandising 
may be termed the foot-soldier of the 
marketing effort. The second condi- 
tion is not so easily answered. 

To establish a balanced merchan- 



IN-STORE DISPLAYS are continuing backbone of retail selling effort. But WISN breaks 
broadcast tradition by omitting call letters on displays because "It doesn't help sell!" 




pRESH 

*i.w*vsv 







using program, stations must realize 
merchandising is not a short cut to 
lake with expectations of a rash of 
new business. Agencies should, and 
most do, properly refuse to accept 
Merchandising as a substitute for per- 
formance. While it is true that a 
certain amount of business accrues to 
broadcasting stations directly as a re- 
sult of marketing activities, the true 
value of a merchandising program 
to a station is indirect and affects re- 
newals of satisfied advertisers and 
relations between advertisers, their 
agencies and media. 

The foundation of any merchandis- 
ing program should he establishment 
of contacts between the station and 
the advertisers" representatives, sales- 
men, retail men. brokers. It is essen- 
tial that station merchandising per- 
sonnel belong to and take an active 
part in all trade organizations normal- 
ly joined by members of advertisers* 
taffs. 

\t this point, two station manage- 
ment decisions of vital importance 
hould be studied, because either can 
Bake or break a merchandising de- 
urrtment. They are the selection of 
ersonnel and cost control. 

\ nood station manager will not 
mt a merchandising program in the 
lands of a promotion-publicity spe- 
cialist. The functions are similar but 
)bjectives are different. The direc- 
ion of a merchandising program 
»\ promotion personnel tends to re- 
ate each activitv primarily to its el- 
ect «m station promotion, and only 
ncidentally to its effect on client 
lies. In this case, merchandising is 
liluted with a mass of stunts and 
vhingdings which add nothing to a 
lation s basic reason for being — to 
urease advertisers* sales. 
It is this aura of promotion which 
H9 uiven radio/tv merchandising 
cbvities a somewhat unsavorv repu- 
ition. It has also related merchan- 
ising to costs of promotion. The lat- 
■r i- necessarv but expensive. Budg- 
tary control, as it applies to mer- 
bandising, differs greatly from the 
sual promotion expense in that each 
lerchandising activity is related to 
hI accomplished for a specific client 
nil promotion is more general and 
idespread. 
This separation makes it compara- 




CLOSE BUSINESS ASSOCIATION with such decision-makers as grocery manufacturers' reps 
is "must" for strong local merchandising effort. WISN hosted this group at studio luncheon 



tivelv easy to express merchandising 
cost as a simple percentage of a 
client's contract. 

Merchandising expenses fall into 
two classifications, depending on how 
the station is going to have to pav for 
the specific service desired. Where 
cash is involved, it"s generally good 
practice to hold the expense between 
1 and 3'y of the client contract, the 
exact figure to be determined by the 
station's choice of base pricing unit 
(gross billing, net time revenue, etc. I . 
If the station can pay for the desired 
service by trading time, the allowable 
expense can be as high as 5 to 7' i . 

To illustrate: Client A buys $10,000 
in base contract time. The allowable 
merchandising expense against this 
will be a cash outlay of $100 to $300 
depending on the cost factor included 
in the station budgets. If. however, 
the station can "pay" in time rath- 
er than cash, this budget can be 
stretched to from $500 to $700. 

We've found that most agencies 
accept an explanation of excessive 
expense for a refusal to extend a 
specific item of merchandising. And 
there are times when we've been re- 
quested to price an item of merchan- 
dising required by an advertiser as 
an additional sen ice. Good merchan- 
dising has value. 

This kind of agency request- "\\ e 
don't want the merchandising: just 
give us the amount vou'd otherwise 
have spent in free 'merchandising' 



'ONSOH 



18 july 1959 



spots*' — indicates complete misunder- 
standing of the merchandising func- 
tion. WISN, AM-TV refuses these re- 
quests as a matter of policy. Our 
merchandising program is not a rate- 
cutter; it's a service to a client. 

There are four major areas wherein 
broadcast stations may render effec- 
tive service to an advertiser: ( 1 1 mar- 
ket information service, (2) promo- 
tion services, (3) assistance with 
wholesale distribution. l4l assistance 
in retail outlets. 

Marketing information service: 
At WISN we've found this activity 
costs the least, is used the most and 
results more directlv in revenue to 
the station than anv other function. 

The simple reason for this: adver- 
tisers and agencies, while compara- 
tively well-informed, are not v\ ell- 
versed in the peculiarities of each 
market where thev do business. 
\\ ith the exception of the largest cor- 
porations, it is too expensive for ad- 
vertisers to subscribe to survev serv- 
ices in more than a few top markets. 
Therefore, their individual market in- 
formation usuallv leaves something to 
be desired. Sales representatives are 
notoriously poor sources of general 
marketing information because thev 
tend to color an informational report 
with their own activities, thereby los- 
ing objecliv itv . 

Market information consists mainly 
of knowing the "bow" and "where 
i Please turn to i>ati<' 07 i 



13 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional television campaigns 



TV RESULTS 



PERSONNEL 

SPONSOR: Star Employment Service, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Agnes Gayner exec director of Star 
Employment Service, Inc.. Miami, felt that the traditional 
newspaper ads were not always effective, and thought that tv 
might provide the dramatic, visual impact necessary to at- 
tract prospects who might ordinarily skip over newspaper 
listings. Also she reasoned that many employed people not 
actively seeking new employment and therefore not turning 
to newspaper want ad sections, might become prospects if 
attractive jobs were advertised on tv. Miss Gayner decided 
that WTVJ could give Star Employment the kind of ex- 
posure it needed, and purchased, on a short-term basis, one 
60-second announcement each week on the Sunday night 
feature movie segment, 11:15 p.m. to sign-off. The first 
announcement alone brought in over 100 applicants; all were 
placed the same day. Subsequent spots produced equally 
good results. Star has since renewed its schedule, and is 
now a regular advertiser on the station throughout the year. 

WTVJ, Miami, Fla. Announcements 



SPORTS 

SPONSOR: Los Angeles Rams 



AGENCY: Direct 



Capsule case history: Advance season ticket sales for the 
Los Angeles Ram pro-football games zoomed to record 
heights this past spring through KNXT promotion. The 
team's management placed a two-week schedule consisting 
of six 20-second spots, three 60-second spots on KNXT. 
Commercials were on film, and showed film clips of the top 
plays of the team's stars. Pete Rozelle. team's manager, 
reported that the KNXT commercials received unprecedented 
attention, and as a result, sales for season tickets climbed 
75' '( over the preceding weeks of the sale. Rozelle said, 
"Exposure on KNXT produced the biggest sale for season 
tickets in the club's history, and there is no telling what the 
gate would be from an extended schedule." Now the club 
is following it up with an intensive campaign beginning this 
month (July). Using similar film clip commercials, Rozelle 
expects to sell between 35,000 and 40,000 season tickets in the 
Southern California area through the new KNXT schedules. 

KNXT, Los Angeles Announcements 



44 



TOYS 

SPONSOR: Williams & Shelton Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Several years ago, the Williams & 
Shelton Co. of Charlotte, N. C, distributors of dry goods, 
toys and notions, purchased a newspaper campaign in area 
papers for its Whirley Bird toys. Although the products were 
selling for half their present cost, the newspaper promotion 
was a failure. For this reason, sales manager W. S. Gray 
was hesitant about participating in a tv campaign for the 
Whirley Bird line again. As an experiment, however, he de- 
cided to try a 25-plan on WSOC-TV. Announcements were 
distributed equally throughout a 10-week period. The cam- 
paign resulted in a complete success for the toys, with 
Williams & Shelton taking orders for over 8,400 Whirley Bird 
units for the initial schedule alone . Gray told the station, 
"I am sold on the power of WSOC-TV as a sales medium, 
and will continue to use it for some time." Gray has since 
renewed schedules several times over for the toys, and is 
planning to use the station's facilities for other products. 

WSOC-TV, Charlotte, N. C. Announcements 



MEAT PACKER 

SPONSOR: Gus Glaser Meats 



AGENCY: Truppe, LaGrau 
& Reynolds 

Capsule case history: Gus Glaser Meats of Fort Dodge. 

Iowa, had never used radio or tv before their campaigns oi 

WOI-TV. Their first venture was participation in WOI's 

Magic Window, 11 a.m. to 12 noon, Monday througl 

Friday, to promote his packaged hot dogs, hams and assortec 

cold cuts. Immediately after his campaign began, Glaser ex 

perienced a tremendous increase in meat sales and, as a result 

purchased full 52-week sponsorship of Casey Jones, a syndi 

cated adventure series. As part of this promotion, Betty Loi 

McVay, hostess of Magic Window, made personal appear 

ances in chain and independent stores. Glaser recently pur 

chased heavy spot schedules at a cost of approximately $21. 

000. "It would be impossible for me to spend such an amoun 

if I were not getting results," he said. "Now, with the hea\ 

sales and increased distribution of my product throughou 

the WOI-TV coverage area, I've had to enlarge my Foi 

Dodge plant facilities in order to take care of my customers.) 

WOI-TV, Des Moines Announcements & Prograrq ' 

SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 



this is the Piedmont Industrial Crescent 



The Piedmont Industrial Crescent is a unique con- 
centration of buying power stretching across 
the productive Piedmont section of North Carolina, 
South Carolina and Virginia. 

It is a vast urban area created by bustling cities, 
booming industry and big agricultural purchasing 
power where millions of your customers WORK, 
EARN, SPEND. 

Strategically located at the hub of this big year- 
round market is WFMY-TV . . . the most powerful 
selling influence, by far. 



and it's dominated by 

uufmy-tv 




this is North Carolina's Inter urbia 




. . . The largest 
metropolitan 
market in the 
two Carolinas. 
Here, WFMY- 
TV dominates 
because it serves 
. . . sells. 




ANNIVEKSAIV YEAR 



uifmy-tv 



GREENSBORO, N. C 



Represented by Harrington, Righter and Parsons, Inc., New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Atlanta, Boston, Detroit 



POiNSOR • 18 JULY 1959 



45 



With increasing "formula" radio, SPONSOR ASKS: 






Is the personality d.j. craze on 




As "formula" programing takes 
hold in some markets, station men 
discuss status of the personality 
disk jockey in today's radio. 

Chuck Blore, ''•/>■ in charge of program- 
ing. Crowell-Collier Broadcasting Corp., 
KFWG, Los Angeles. KEWB, Oakland 
If the personality d.j. is the golden- 
tongued. $100,000-a-year. lethargic, 



"Individualist" 
d.j. is on his 
way out 



loquacious, self-styled music critic, 
the answer is "Yes." 

The modern d.j. is a man who 
knows where he is going, what 
he is going to say, and — most impor- 
tant — knows why. He is a highly 
trained specialist, who, not unlike 
Stanislawski, demands motivation for 
any action. He realizes that only the 
merest minority give a damn ahout 
his pontifications on the pros and 
cons of every record. The listener 
knows whether or not he likes the 
record and beyond that his chief re- 
action to anything the d.j. says about 
it is complete indifference. 

The job of the d.j. today is to 
establish his personality between rec- 
ords. He must say what he has to 
say in a brief, bright, entertaining 
manner. He has a reason for every 
remark, a motivation for every move. 
Will it entertain and inform? Does 
the listener care? 

The d.j.'s at KFWB in Los Angeles 
are all personalities, each one differ- 
ent from the next. Today's "mod- 
ern" operation requires a distinct per- 
sonality to keep the approach fresh 
and different enough to establish a 
distinctive quality for your station. 
For example, Bruce Hayes, probably 
the greatest spontaneous wit in the 
business today; Joe Yocam, the hap- 



py "woman's home companion"; Ted 
Quillim, ultra-hip country boy; El- 
liot Field, a thousand voices and a 
rating point for each one; B. Mitchell 
Reed, the teenager's friend and night- 
time salesman ; Bill Ballance, the 
most-imitated d.j. in America with a 
gag file unlimited; Red Blanchard. 
the night creature and president of 
the "I Dread Red" — seven distinct 
personalities proving that the radio 
operation will not hinder the person- 
ality of a good d.j. 

Mel Bailey, Westinghouse Broadcasting 
Co., program director, ft BZ, Boston 
The disk jockey craze has not fluc- 
tuated. The d.j.'s are responsible for 
a receptive and loyal audience 
and an audience which has come to 



Strong 
personalities 




are essen 



tial 



rely on them for companionship. 

On WBZ Radio, Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. Boston outlet, the 
disk jockeys have maintained a po- 
tent influence with their listeners. 
Their popularity has been solely re- 
sponsible for the overwhelming suc- 
cess of several of our recent promo- 
tions in which they participated. 

As an example, over 25,000 per- 
sons attended the sports car gym- 
khana at the North Shore shopping 
center outside Boston which was 
sponsored by WBZ Radio. The gym- 
khana featured a cape-cart race be- 
tween the station personalities Dave 
Maynard, Norm Prescott, Alan Dary 
and Phil Christie. The meet was pro- 
moted exclusively on WBZ Radio. 

WBZ Radio has also invaded the 
movie industry. A technicolor cine- 
mascope film feature, "Meet the WBZ 
Disk Jockeys," is currently playing 
in over 450 New Enaland theaters. 



This short, a la Person to Person, is 
enabling a coterie of WBZ disk jock- 
eys to realize additional exposure 
with their Boston and New England 
audience. 

We were recently approached by 
one of the largest amusement and rec- 
reational centers in New England with 
a proposal for large broadcasts to 
originate from the park by our disk 
jockeys. The officials realize that 
word-of-mouth advertising plus the 
drawing power of our disk jockeys 
will assure them an increase in gate 
attendance. 

Mort Hall, president, KLAC, Los 
Angeles 

The personality d.j. is far from 
dead. However, his role has changed. 

The modern d.j. is not involved in 
the selling job as he once was. Gonei 
are the long, off-the-cuff type spot 
announcements. Instead we find him 
working around a schedule of tran-| 
scribed spot announcements prepared 
by agencies. His program has be- 
come a carrier for these announce- 
ments and adapting his personality be 
this type of programing is what he 
must learn. 



D.j. today 
has tough 
job 



Do people listen for music o 
d.j.'s? It appears they listen for botl 
elements. It's the blending that satis 
fies. Non-personality broadcastin; 
ostensibly has nothing to tie it to 
gether. It's difficult to stage com 
munity products such as the annu? 
KLAC Hollywood Bowl Show whic 
last year attracted a full house oj 
18,500 people and produced $74,00 
for local charities. This show eac| 
year is built entirely around KLAC 
personalities. 




46 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 195j 



the wane? 



The modern d.j. ha? his place. He 
ties the operation together and re- 
flects a pride necessan for believe- 
ability. With the right type of d.j.'s 
the greatest objection is eliminated. — 
using valuable station time for 
inane monologues on everything from 
who was playing sax on the record to 
what his wife fed him for breakfast. 

Arthur Tolchin, executive vice-presi- 
dent and director of WMGM. New York 

Speaking for radio station WMGM 
only, absolutely not. 

It's personalities such as Ted 
Brown and The Redhead. Jerry Mar- 
shall. Norm Stevens. Peter Tripp. 
Dean Hunter and Dick De Freitas are 
Mime popular than ever before and 
:ach enjoy greater stature daily. In- 
disputable evidence of the impor- 
tance of disk jockeys at WMGM, 
where they are known rightfully as 
radio personalities, is shown in the 



Their audience 
is increasing 



ast three consecutive Pulse and Niel- 
sen rating reports which prove that 
■ur personalities are enjoying the 
greatest listening audiences of their 
areers. 

Further, they have helped radio 

Nation WMGM to become the second 

jnost popular station in the Greater 

New York metropolitan area with 

atings now at the highest peak in its 

wars of broadcasting. 

Each of our personalities is dis- 
inctive in his voice quality, air sales- 
nanship and general program con- 
tact. All are real professionals who 
\now how to put together in the right 
proportion the need to entertain for 
maximum listenership interest and at 
■he same time selling the sponsor's 
product who, after all. pays the bills. 




WCSH-TV 6 



NBC Affiliate 



Portland, Maine 




NEWS PROVES 



MORE HOMES 
WATCH SIX 



The April '59 Area ARB again proves you get a bigger, 
more receptive audience on 6. 

Our News Journal (6:30-7:00 p.m., Mon.-Ffi.) is the 
highest rated news show on any area station. It reaches 
an average of 47,380 homes daily, while Station "B's" 
news averages 14,000. 

Ask your Weed TV man about SIX's share of quarter- 
hour firsts, too. 

And remember a matching spot schedule on Channel 2 in 
Bangor saves an extra 5%. 



A MAINE 
BROADCASTING STSTEM 

STATION 



•PONSOR 



18 july 1959 



WLBZ-TV - (2), Bangor 
WCSH-TV - (6), Portland 
WCSH-Radio, Portland 
WLBZ-Radio, Bangor 
WRDO-Radio, Augusta 

47 



RADIO BASICS /JULY 



Facts & figures about radio today 

1. CURRENT RADIO DIMENSIONS 



Radio homes index 



1959 1958 



49.5 
radio 
homes 





48.7 
radio 
homes 



51.4 50.6 

U.S. homes U.S. homes 

Source: A. C. Nielsen estimate. 1 Mar. each 
year, homes figures in millions. 



Radio set index 



Set 
location 



Home 
Auto 
Public 
places 

Total 



1959 



1957 



98,300,000 90,000,000 
37,900,000 35,000,000 

10,000,000* 10,000,000 



146,200,000 135.000,000 



Source: RAB. 1 Jan. 1959. 1 July 1957 
sets in working order. *No new information. 



Radio station index 







End 


of 


June 


1959 










Stations 
on air 




CPs not 
on air 


New station 
requests 


New 
bids 


station* 
n hearing 


Am 
Fm 




1 3,377 
1 622 


1 


123 

147 


1 516 

| 49 


1 


155 
21 






End 


of 


June 


1958 






Am 
Fm 




1 3,253 
1 548 


1 


100 
86 


1 412 
39 


1 


126 
18 


Source: 


FCC 


monthly reports, eommeicial stations. *May each year. 







Radio set sales index 



Type 


May 1959 


May 1958 


5 Months 
1959 


5 Months 
1958 


Home 
Auto 


400,882 
476,222 


385,383 
185,616 


2,480,686 
2,262,390 


2,084,937 
1.229.086 


Total 

Source: Elec 
factory product 


877,104 

:ronic Industries 
ion. 


570,999 

Assn. Hume figures 


4,743,076 

are retail sales. 


3,314,023 

auto figures are 



2. CURRENT LISTENING PATTERNS 



PERCENT OUT-OF-HOME LISTENING ADDS TO IN-HOME IN 28 MARKETS 

MARKET TOTAL AUDIENCE IN HOME + OUT OF HOME = OUT OF HOME PLUS 

ATLANTA 20.5% 16.4% 4.1% 25.0% 

BIRMINGHAM 19.8 15.7 4.1 26.0 

BOSTON 21.7 16.7 5.0 29.9 

CHICAGO 23.0 18.6 4.4 23.6 

CLEVELAND 18.9 4.9 4.0 26.8 

FORT WORTH 19.9 15.6 4.3 27.5 

LOS ANGELES 22.5 17.5 5.0 28.5 

NEW YORK 22.7 17.7 5.0 28.3 

PHILADELPHIA 21.9 18.0 3.9 21.7 

ST. LOUIS 21.0 16.6 4.4 26.5 

SAN FRANCISCO 22.7 17.8 4.9 27.5 

SEATTLE 22.3 17.8 4.5 25.2 

1 Source: Tulse, Jan. -Feb. -Mar. 1959 

SitlUliiiiiiil ii minimum in in inn miimmuinininminimi ilium nil minim i mi nun unnnnnninn i n i inn mum mnnnnimn nnininninninininni nun i niniinHunninmninn iiniimm 

NOTE: In 20 June Radio Basics a Nielsen study showed hourly listening by lo?al time winter and summer. The study was incorrectly labeled "millions of 
homes" per average minute. It should have been "percent of homes." 

48 SPONSOR • 18 JULY 19ii 




People who like a good nights 
sleep fly KLM to Europe >+- 




you like comfort as much as speed ... if midnight fuel stops get on your nerves ... if 
)u appreciate the very best in airline service . . . KLM is your cup of tea. Non-stop DC-7C 

ross the Atlantic twice daily. Fly KLM to Europe . . . and beyond! See your travel 
$ent or KLM office. KLM Royal Dutch Airlines, 609 Fifth Avenue, New York 17, N. Y. 

I'ONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 




49 



RESPONSE THROUGH 
RESPONSE-ABIUTY 



Advertisers demand response and 
they get it on WJAR, the best buy in a 
"must-buy" market. Our responsibility 
to you stems from 35 years of solid-sell 
to the nation's most concentrated popu- 
lation, with buy-ability. 



PLUS 



• New personalities, programming 
and promotion 

• Low cost per thousand 

• 5000 watts of Sell, in the Billion- 
Plus market 

• Merchandising if you need it 

• Top buy in a Top Test Market 

HI - 




SALESMAN 

SHERM BROWN 

5 a.m. — 9 a.m. I ^ 
Monday through Saturday 





SALESMAN 
LARRY MARTIN 

9 a.m. - 12 Nn. 

Monday through Saturday 



SALESMAN 
ART LAKE 

12 Nn. -2 p.m. 
Monday through Friday 





SALESMAN 

RUSSVAN ARSDALE 

2 p.m. — 5 p.m. 
Monday through Friday 



SALESMAN 
ART CURLEY 

5 p.m. — 9 p.m. 

Monday through Friday 





SALESMAN 

GENEDEGRAIDE 

9 p.m. — 1 a.m. 
Monday through Saturday 



NBC NEWS 
SPORTS, 
MONITOR / rSJ 

Sister station of WJAR - TV 
Represented proudly by Edward Petry & Co. 



National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completet 



POT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

Bristol-Myers Co., New York: A campaign is getting off in aboul 
50 markets for Vitalis hair cream. Schedules begin the fourth week 
of July for nine to 20 weeks, depending on market. Night minutes 
are being placed, with frequencies varying. Buyer: Bob Widholm 
Agency : DCS&S, New York. 

Kellogg Co., Battle Creek: Test schedules are being set in Wesl 
Coast markets for Concentrate. Product is a high protein cereal anc 
the pitch at this time is strictly to adults. Big national campaign is 
planned for the fall. Agency: Leo Burnett Co.. Chicago. 

The Toni Co., Chicago: Going into test markets for its new hail 
rinse, Colorcade. Expansion is expected in late fall. Agency: \nrtl 
Advertising. Chicago. 
Lever Bros. Co., New York: Schedules for Surf are being added ii 
various markets; day minutes. Starts 3 August for nine weeks 
Buyer: Hal Davis. Agency: BBDO, New York. 

American Chicle Co., Long Island City, N.Y.: Campaign for Den 
t\ne spearmint gum begins 3 August in about 20 markets. Som< 
schedules are short-term, others run through the end of the year 
Night minutes in fringe time are being lined up. Buyer: Herb Wei 
man. Agenc\ : Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, New York. 

Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati: Additional schedules for Liqui. 
Ivory in scattered markets starting fourth week in July for P&( 
contract year. Non-prime minutes are being used. Buyer: Hair 
Meline. Agency : Compton, New York. 

American Home Foods, New York: Campaign being initiated fo 
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee in about 40 markets, to start 3 August for 18 or 2 
weeks. Schedule: day and night minutes, night chains and 20's, wit. 
the big concentration on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Buyin 
supervisor: Russ Young. Agency: Young & Rubicam, New York 

RADIO BUYS 

Best Foods, Div. of Corn Products Co., New York: New campaig 
in top markets for its mayonnaise. Six-week schedules start fourt 
week in July; daytime minutes. Buyer: Dorothy Medanic. Agency 
Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, New York. 

American Tobacco Co., New York: Four week schedules of da 
minutes, to start fourth week in July. Frequencies depend on marke 
Buyer: Fred Spruytenburg. Agency: SSCB, New York. 
Reader's Digest, Pleasantville, New York. : New drive kicks off th 
week with one-week saturation schedules in 158 markets. Mondf 
through Saturdav schedules of minutes, 20's, 30's, and I.D.'s in ai 
around news and weather slots. Buyer: Polly Allen. Agency: JW 
New York. 



50 



SPONSOR 



18 JULY 19S 



ssv&^Sr 




SHOTGUN SLADE 



STARRI NG 



SCOTT BRADY 



Pre-Sold in 28 markets, 17 states, to Ballantine Beer 

Set your sights for the big audience -with TV's "detective on 
horseback." SHOTGUN SLADE headlines rugged Scott Brady 
as a man who tames the West's wildest badmen — and women! 
Here's your chance to hit the "top 10" with both barrels . . . 
roaring adventure, thrill-a-minute mystery. This series sells on 
sight, so shoot us a call today! 



39 



ALL NEW HALF HOURS ON FILM FOR 
REGIONAL AND LOCAL SPONSORSHIP 



produced by 



d □ a 



productions 



mca tv 



Now...tv's 2 greatest audience appeals 
combine in 1 great show! 




What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



Most U.S. radio stations could be wrecked by interference from north and 
south of our borders, and only a "gentlemen's agreement" is saving the situation. 

That was the story heard by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in a one-day hear- 
pumjoatiom inc. ing on ratification of the NARBA and U.S.-Mexican treaties. 

FCC commissioners Hyde and Cross, plus W. T. M. Beale, Jr., for the State Department 
pleaded for ratification. However, the Daytime Broadcasters Association still expressed 
opposition to the Mexican treaty. DBA wants longer-hour operation by daytimers on 
Mexican clear channels, a proposition to which Mexico refuses to agree. 

The three government witnesses stressed the dangers in another failure of the U.S. Sen- 
ate to ratify. NARBA first went to the Senate in 1953, and the U.S.-Mexican pact was sub- 
mitted in 1957. No ratification yet. Hyde pointed to the fact that Cuba has already "jumped" 
some Mexican radio frequencies, and said similar acts could come at any time, leading to re- 
taliation, and from there leading to interference which could destroy radio service in this 
hemisphere. 

J. R. Livesay, DBA president, was agreeable to ratification of the North American treaty, 
but counseled against the Mexican. He said it is ridiculous to protect Mexican stations against 
far-away U.S. daytimers, and charged the pact merely permits Mexican stations to serve U.S. 
areas which don't want their programs in any case. 

Hyde, Cross and Beale responded that they had secured the best agreement they could 
obtain from Mexico, and that it would be foolish to endanger all U.S. radio stations merely 
to press for added rights for the 250-odd daytimers on Mexican clear channels. 

Subcommittee chairman Wayne Morse (D., Ore.), cautioned the government witnesses 
that they should "count heads" to be sure they have the needed two-thirds vote in the 
Senate for treaty ratification. 

The whole situation appeared to revolve around whether the daytimers would content 
themselves with "on the record" opposition, while not actively opposing ratification. Final 
denial of their bid for longer operating hours was calculated by the FCC to give them no fur- 
ther reason and nothing to gain by continued opposition. 

If the FCC move fails to work, it will be North American frequency allocation by contin- 
ued "gentlemen's agreement," which could be breached at any time. 

Advocates of extensive revision of the political equal time rules, Sec. 315 of 
the communications act, continue to lose ground. 

The House Commerce Communications subcommittee, after holding hearings, decided on 
a very narrow overruling of the FCC's Lar Daly decision, and some subcommittee members 
expressed fears even this relief is too broad. 

The proposal turned over to the full House Commerce Committee for final action mere- 
ly exempts from the equal time requirement, newscasts, news interviews and on- 
the-spot coverage of newsworthy events. There was some disposition on the part of sub- 
committee members to oppose exemption for anything but newscasts. 

The full committee is virtually certain to go along with the subcommittee, but it appears 
that many more discussions may be held to clear up ambiguities in definitions. Final decision 
might be to limit the exemption merely to newscasts. 

The Senate Commerce Communications subcommittee is expected to act very shortly on 
the same question, and undoubtedly very much in the same directions. There appears to be 
absolutely no grounds for hope of any broad scale loosening of the terms of Sec. 315. 

ponsor • 18 july 1959 55 




>__ 

18 JULY 1959 

Cooyrliht IMt 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



Summer selling for fall starting dates of new syndicated shows continued active 
last week despite the fact there seemed to be less new product available than in 
past seasons. 

Here are sales progress indications reported last week: 

• Ziv's Lock-Up reached the 157-market level after six weeks of selling with signings by 
Kroger Stores in four markets and 11 other sponsor deals. 

• Screen Gems' Manhunt, sold to Genessee Beer in nine New York markets and Alka- 
Seltzer in six Western cities, reached sales coverage of 50 cities. 

• ABC Films' Congressional Investigator was sold in all of Canada to Procter and Gam- 
ble for 52 weeks on a spot schedule basis. 






There are symptoms that a long-range reshuffling of syndication share and 
status of the various companies is now in progress. 

Factors that point to drastic changes in the nature of the film market from the producer's 
and distributor's viewpoint within a year or two are these: 

1) An influx of Hollywood organizations into domestic and international syndication, 
including United Artists, MGM, Warner Brothers, 20th Century-Fox. 

2) Increasing success by some syndicators in closing network deals; hoth Ziv and CNP. 
for example, have taken on a network supply role only in the last season or two. 

3) The beginnings of tape syndication, which while still mostly limited to the station 
rather than the regional level, is a threat of unknown dimensions to producers with vest- 
ed interests in filming. 



Off-network shows are frequently dependable ratings attractions in their syn 
dication re-runs, earning shares that compare favorably with what they scored on 
the network schedules. 

Medic, for example, actually earned a higher share in syndication than it did 

on NBC TV, notes an NBC Television Films study of 10 markets. The syndication share 
average was 38% , higher than the network share which was 32%. 

In this 10-city comparison, the two-year network ARB average was compared to the first 
syndicated run ARB scores, with this result: In re-run, Medic held up with a 15.6 rating 
average against 20.7 on the network. 

Here are detailed ARB ratings and shares averages for the 10 markets: 



56 



MARKET 




STATION 


1st synd. 


RUN 


NETWORK 


RUN 








Rating 


Share 


Rating 


Share 


Atlanta 




WAGA-TV 


4.7 


35% 


23.6 


38% 


Baltimore 




WJZ-TV 


2.8 


33% 


21.0 


32% 


Dallas-Ft. 


Worth 


WFAA-TV 


10.1 


29% 


13.7 


25% 


Detroit 




WJBK-TV 


11.9 


34% 


24.4 


39% 


Honolulu 




KONA-TV 


21.1 


31% 


25.1 


3.V, 


Norfolk 




WAVY-TV 


17.2 


36'; 


7.1 


10% 


Omaha 




KETV 


19.3 


77% 


13.7 


23', 


Phoenix 




KVAR-TV 


18.8 


34% 


12.4 


17% 


Richmond 




WRVA-TV 


21.7 


54% 


37.4 


659? 


Scranton-Wilkes B. 


WBRE-TV 


18.6 


37% 


28.1 


37% 


Ten-City 


Average 




15.6 


38% 


20.7 

SPONSOR • 18 


32% 
JULY 195S 



;.v J 



FILM-SCOPE continued 



National Theater's ownership of NTA will likely be followed shortly by tin- 
adoption of a new name for the company : NT&T, meaning National Theaters and 
Television. 

NTA announced recently it would move its general executives, features and international 
sales units and advertising-publicity departments from New York to the West Coast where Na- 
tional Theaters could exercise more control. 

Stations may have an embarrassment of riehes with sponsored first-run syndi- 
cated shows this fall if and when time periods become scarce. 

Many outlets have reached an all-time high with half-hour sponsors of new syndicated 
shows, and there may be more orders than time to be sold come the fall. 

WABC-TV, New York, for example, last month was telecasting five first-run shows, twice 
the number of the previous year, and three of these were in 10:30 p.m. time slots committed 
to network shows for the fall. 

There's been a resurgence of charges of ultra-high-pressure selling against 
some syndicators made lately by their bitter competitors. 

One syndicator has been repeatedly accused of virtually dumping its new product at 
unheard of prices to snare new syndication spenders and lure away the opposition's 
existing clients. 

Another syndicator was charged with pulling the rug out from under a number of sta- 
tions at the last minute when local contracts were already half-signed and a chance to make 
a regional deal came along. 

Both syndicated and network shows appear to be the losers as far as ratings are 
concerned in time period recaptures from former option time. 

In a nutshell what's happened is this: Audiences that formerly split two ways are now 
divided among three attractions, with correspondingly lower ratings often the case all around. 

It also takes up to two years for a network show in recaptured time to build up its station 
line-up to full coverage; Schlitz's Markham, for example, has only 75' i coverage in June Niel- 
sen and understandably won't get coverage in many major cities for some time. 



COMMERCIALS 

Robert Lawrence is taking a blast at the misuse of tv tape in a letter being 
mailed to advertisers this week. 

Several advertisers have had to re-make commercials on film because quickly-needed ini- 
tial tape versions were inadequate for permanent use. the letter (barges. 

Further. Lawrence urged buyers to keep creative and quality standards high instead ol 
making production sacrifices for the sake of speed and economy. 

The Lawrence compart] intends to go into tape eventually and the intent of the letter 
was only to criticize specific tape practices. 

You can never tell these days if film commercials will wind up as items of 
entertainment or of archeology. 

Take these ewnts of the past week, for instance: 

Jack Paar inserted as part of his nightly fare on NBC T\ some French-made commercials 
— and for free. 

In New York Piels Bros, in dedicating the foundation of its new brewery building in- 
cluded as part of a time capsule a Bert and Harry commercial. 

■onsor • 18 july 1959 57 



A round-up of trade talk 
trends and tips for admi 



18 JULY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



SPONSOR HEARS 






The head of one of the pioneer firms in commercial production is negotiating f 
a sell-out of his stock interest. 

The capital gains deal will take him out of the business. 



Don't be surprised if Lee Rich, top man on media at B&B, also winds up in a she- 
calling capacity over programing buys at the agency. 

At the moment, the setup in the tv/radio department is this: He and Oliver Barbe 
a v.p. in that department, are jointly looking after the show end. 



Look for a strong upsurge among American agencies toward establishing — < 
expanding — international offices. 

Here's why: (1) Our export business continues to decline, so American industry mu 
look to investments abroad for the difference; (2) foreign offices make a good defensh 
measure for clients with international involvements; (3) tax advantages. 






Some agency circles are predicting that the preemption pattern on the tv m 
works will undergo another change during the 1960-1961 season. 

To make more time available for the one and two-time users, the networks (say the 
prophets) will stake out four preemptions. The present arrangement at NBC TV ar 
CBS TV is for two preemptions in 52 weeks. 



58 



In pitching for the Campbell Soup account ($11-12 million; now at BBDO) M 
Cann-Erickson astutely avoids any references to magazine advertising. It keeps tal 
ing about the superior job it can do for the account in tv. 

Reason for the tactic: 

Campbell's consumer magazine copy traditionally has come up with very formid 
ble readership scores. 

With the networks and freelance producers bent on capitalizing on the Civil War 
Centennial Year ( 1960), don't be surprised if somebody resurrects a radio oldie, Ros< 
and Drums. 

Produced by JWT, Roses and Drums was sponsored by Union Central Life Insuranc 
Incidentally, it was the first radio drama staged in an auditorium (Carnegie Hal 
with the actors in costumes. 

Here are some thumbnail images of the three networks, evolved by Madison Ay 
on the basis of their program schedules for the fall: 

ABC TV: Has the steady diet of bread-and-butter fare. 

NBC TV: Covers the bread-and-butter with mounds of expensive prestige marm 
lade. 

CBS TV: Plays both sides of the street and uses its unique and costly flair for t! 
public affairs type of programing to offset any tarnish. 






SPONSOR 



18 JULY 19. 



HURRY . . HURRY . . bring your 
friends & family to the 1st annual 
RTES outing— all day Thurs. July 30th 
beautiful Pelham Country Club . . . 

EVERBODY INVITED . . . THERE'LL BE 
PLENTY TO DO— Coif for the 

divot diggers . . . swimming . . . 
tennis . . . PRIZES and TROPHIES 
CALORE . . . just plain fun. 

ONLY 30 MINUTES FROM N. Y. 




Dinner begins at 7:00 pm — 
sumptuous Roast Beef 
followed by dancing to 
Hal Davis' Many Splendored Stompers 

all for $9.00 
Send your check now to 

RTES, 5r5~Madison Ave. 



I >NSOR • 18 JULY 1959 



59 







WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



"1060 FREEDOM FLIGHT" promotion by WRCV, Phila. urges townspeople to visit Indepen- 
dence Hall. Poster gets the official seal of approval from City Rep. Frederic R. Mann (r) 
joined by station's prog, mgr., Bob Benson, staffer Pat Neely. First prize: trip to Hawaii 



AGENCIES 




Two client-agency long-years c 
association relationships came t 
an end this week with the spli 
ting away of Chesebrough-Pond 
from McCann-Erickson and War 
Baking's Tip Top Bread ($3.j 
million) from J. Walter Thorn] 
son. 

Chesebrough's Vaseline and Pe 
tussin products ($3 million) out ( 
McC-E will be turned over to oth< 
agencies in the C-P stable. 

The bread account's gone to Gre 
which already handles the Ward cal 
line. 

Aside from the fact that agencit 
are content to leave the control of 
programing in the hands of the nel 
works, the quiz conducted amor! 
Madison Avenue programers by a|< 
FCC examiner disclosed this: 
Four agencies alone account fa 
close to $400 million in tv bil, 
ings. They are: JWT, $150 millic 



PIONEER AWARD goes to WEJL, Scrant, 
from Broadcast Pioneers Assoc, for outstan 
ing service. BPA's Frank Silvernail (r) mak 
presentation to station's owner Edward J. L 
net (c) and gen. mgr. Cecil Woodlat 




$12,000 DONATION was gate of 1st Norl 
ern Wis. Sports Show sponsored by WBA 
WBAY-TV, Green Bay. Here Max Franc , 
(r), pres. of Brown City Conservation Allian 
gets check from sta. mgr. Haydn R. Eva 




tof a total of $300 million: Y&R, 
|00 million out of $230 million; Mc- 
(nn-Erickson. $85 million out of 
■00 million: BBDO, $75 million out 
, |200 million and Bates, $85 mil- 
I n out of $105 million. 

I you're interested in the legal 
roblems of advertising, try to 
it a copy of the ring-binder 
<mpilation of the subject by 
l&E. 

It was primarily put together for 
lents and personnel and the contents 
|e of considerable value to any one 
: it lias to deal with such matters as 
i|i\. photos, trade marks and trade 
mho. literary material, copyright, 
lent, unsolicited ideas and whatnot. 

I he model forms enclosed for re- 
uses and contracts are in themselves 
■rthwhile having. 

BDO has established a media 
pins board. It consists of Fred 
hrrett, v. p. and media director; 
pbert Anderson, trade publica- 
Ins; S. Austin Brew, newspapers; 



Kent D'Alessandro, plans and 
media analysis; Edward Fieri, Jr.. 
spot broadcast; Charles McKeever, 

network broadcast; Louis Millot, 
Jr., magazines, and Daniel O'- 
Grady, outdoor. Each of the board 
members will have the designation of 
media supervisor. 

Agency appointments: Cunard 
Steam-Ship, with billing at $1,000,- 
000, user of some spot radio from 
Ellington & Co., to Compton . . . 
Junket Quick Fudge Mix. to Warden 
Associates, New York . . . Hambro 
Automotive's Austin line, billing 
$750,000. from the McCarty Co.. to 
J. M. Mathes . . . Friend Brothers. 
Melrose, Mass., to Hoag & Provan- 
die, Boston . . . National Drinks' 
Vernor's, for Southern Calif., to 
Tilds & Cantz, Los Angeles . . . 
Armstrong Co., Kansas ice cream 
manufacturer, to Wentzel & Fluge, 
Chicago . . . Schulze & Burch Biscuit 
Co., to Compton, Chicago . . . 
Aansworth. Ltd. and Aansworth Duet, 
to North Advertising, New York 



. . . Baltimore I'aint and Colm \\ ork>. 
and Murphy Paints, divisions of Bal- 
timore Paint and Chemical, to Van- 
Sant, Dugdale & Co. . . . Stellar- 
dyne Laboratories, El Cajon, Calif., 
billing $100,000, to Armstrong, 
Fenton & Vinson, San Diego . . . 
Philco Distributors. Inc.. Chicago, to 
Terry, Gary-Schwartz & Harris 
. . . Scholz Homes, Toledo, Ohio, to 
MacManus, John and Adams, 
Bloomfield Hills. Mich. . . . Innes 
shoe stores, Southern Calif., to Beck- 
man, ki.l. lii/. Inc., Los Angeles. 

New agency: Stanley Grayson and 
Allen Kaye-Martin. formerly associ- 
ated with Regal Advertising, have 
joined to form Media Services Ad- 
vertising, New York. 

Personnel moves: Clifford Spil- 
ler, vice chairman of the board of 
directors. SSC&B . . . Marion 
Vaughn, media director. Jimnn 
Fritz and Assoc. Hollywood, Cal. . . . 
Harry W. Bennet, Jr., Robert C. 
Durham Assoc, Inc. . . . Elaine 



- 



OLF TOURNEY staged by WOAI, San Antonio for clients, agency 
$J station personnel drew 51 golfers to 1st tee. They vied for all- 
ebense trip to Acapulco awarded for tee shot closest to 18th hole. 



CREATIVE TROPHY awarded annually by National Advertising 
Agency Network is presented to David Hume (r), pres. Hume, Smith, 
Mickelberry by Geo. Doyne, Doyne Adv. at six-day NAAN conference 




ICKY US! Here K&E timebuyers, Ed Kolza (I), Bob Morton (c), 
: free tickets to famed Patterson-Johansson fight from Adam Young's 
In Chapman. They won KIOA, Des Moines contest staged by Young 



FLIPPED FOR HI-FI HOP! Teenagers turned out for show, signed up 
for Tulsa's new Hi-Fi Club. Roy Mitchell, KAKC, Tulsa (r), show's 
host, and Coca-Cola Bottler rep. Harley Crow kept "hop" hopping 







FOUR 

TIMES 
YOUR 
MONEY'S 
WORTH 



In Shreveport, one of America's fastest growing 
markets, you get a lot more for your money 
when you specify KTBS-TV, Channel 3. 
All Nielsen surveys show KTBS-TV the dom- 
inant station in a market over four times larger 
than Shreveport's metropolitan area in pop- 
ulation and income. Here is coverage that really 
counts - 1,318,600 people with $1,661,784,000 
to spend. 

Ask your Petry man for the story on the FULL 
Shreveport market. You'll find KTBS-TV not 
only gives you your money's worth, but more, 
lots more. 



NBC 




ABC 



E. Newton Wray, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 



Just ukc androcjlcs 
and thc hon 




people 

REACT 

to the 

voice and vision 

of NBC in 

South Bend - Elkhart 

call Petry today! 

WNDU - TV cHANNELi6 

BERNIE BARTH & TOM HAMILTON 



Akst, media director, The Rockmore 
Company . . . Laurence F. Donino, 
account executive on Westinghouse 
Broadcasting, Ketchum, MacLeod & 
Grove . . . William G. Fisher, pro- 
duction mgr., Wentzel & Fluge, Chi- 
cago, 111. . . . William B. Harmon, 
ass't director of radio and tv, Rogers 
& Smith, Kansas City, Mo. 

They became v.p.'s: Reggie 
Schuebel, GB&B . . . West Gilling- 
ham, Clark & Bobertz, Detroit, Mich. 
. . . Alan Koehler, Norman Craig & 
Kummel . . . John F. Hogan, 
EWR&R . . . Dr. Richard H. Bax- 
ter, C&W . . . David D. Wines and 
Ralph L. Wolfe, D. P. Brother & 
Co., Detroit, Mich. 

More personnel moves: Named 
to Board of Directors, Campbell- 
Mithun: Norman F. Best, William 
C. Lyddan, and Paul E. Morgan 
. . . Francis O'Neil, account exec, 
on imported cars, K&E . . . William 
Doscher, director of marketing re- 
search, Arthur Meyerhoff . . . Edwin 
Marshall, business mgr. of the radio 
and tv dept., and Eldon E. Fox, 
ass't mgr., Minneapolis office, BBDO 
. . . L. F. Ohliger, v. p. and market- 
ing supervisor, Burnett . . . Ray C. 
Montgomery, research supervisor, 
Clinton E. Frank, Chicago, 111. . . . 
Tatham-Laird. Chicago, 111., appoints: 
Val Ritter, assoc. media supervisor 
for Whitehall Laboratories; Joan 
Wilke, creative staff and A. R. Men- 
zies, account exec. . . . Charles E. 
Claggett, chairman of the board of 
directors, Gardner Advertising Co., 
St. Louis . . . Pete Dalton, to Dona- 
hue & Co., from Benton & Bowles, 
where he bought time for the Tide 
account . . . Charles Pooler, senior 
v.p. in charge of administration, to 
head international operations, Benton 
& Bowles. 



ADVERTISERS 



A major factor in the H. J. Heinz 
decision this week to renew its 
four daytime quarter-hours a 
week on NBC TV for the fall was 
the result of a salad recipe pro- 
motion. 

The response from its one-time of- 
fer on Tic Tac Dough in June was 
four times what it had expected. 

Another NBC daytime renewal of 
special interest: Frigidaire's three 



quarter-hours a week. DFS whi 

it pitched for this account stressi 
the point that ticket items could I 
sold as effectively in daytime tv 
foods. 

Personnel appointments: Rid 
ard K. Snively, named advertisii 
mgr. of Revere Copper and Bras 
Inc. . . . Edgar A. Manning, Ji 

v.p., Bankers Trust Co.'s Amuseme 
Industries group . . . Dr. Joseph i 
Coleman, elected president, Maid< 
Form Brassiere Co., New York 
Stephen E. Upton, advertising ar 
promotion manager, Whirlpo 
Corp.'s Utility division . . . Georg 
Magnuson, manager of market r 
search, Libby McNeill & Libby . . 
Robert Prentice, marketing servic 
director. Lever Brothers . . . John 1 
Bricker, replacing Stuart Shernu 
as Colgate Corporate v.p. in char; 
of marketing. 



FILM 



The parade of motion pictui 
companies toward tv film contii 
ued last week, with Pathe as tl 
latest entry. 

Pathe's first tv film series, as a 
nounced: something untitled, in ct 
or and to be produced in England. 

Fiscal note: Desilu issued its a 
nual stockholders report with net i 
come of $249,566 and $.22 per sha 
earnings on 1.150.000 outstandii 
shares. The report indicated a 150'; 
increase in net earnings and a 33' 
rise in gross volume over the previo 
year. The 1959 volume was $20 
million. 

Sales: Ziv reports a 34% increa 
in six-month volume over 1958. at 
recent sDonsor sales on Lock-Up i 
eluding Kroser Stores in Lexingto 
Louisville, Roanoke and Winsto, 
Salem; E. D. Edwards in Syracus 
Old Monaster- Wine in New Havei 
PhilliDs 66 Oil in Chicago; Orth 
Beer in Philadelphia; Old Kent Tri 
Co. in Gr^nd Rapids; Warehou 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



62 



SPONSOR 



18 JULY 19 > 





"Listen to this, Bill", said the WeeReBeL as he sat on the desk to chat with Bill Hinman, 

Lambert & Feasley, Inc., New York. 

Haue you heard what the 111 leReBel 
said to Lambert & Feasley? 

We're a combination hard to beat...'''' 

Metropolitan Columbus, Georgia is the 25th market in the U. S. for per family income 
| ... over a million people can watch us in our 47 county coverage area . . . 
WRBL-TV and WRBL Radio are the stations that consistently pav off for advertisers. 
CALL HOLLINGBERY for top ratings, rate details . . . package plans . . . market 
data . . . programming information . . . penetration data . . . and prime availabilities. 



WufUBtL 

WUMBVS . C10UG13 



^^t» 




WRBL 

TV-CHANNEL 4 • RADIO-5000 WATTS 

a (oiumBus, Gn.@ 

Represented by George P. Hollingbery Co. 




I'ONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 



63 



Markets in Fort Smith; R. J. Reyn- 
olds and Swiss Colony Wine in San 
Francisco; Interstate Power Co. in 
Mason City; Child's Big Chain Stores 
in Tyler; Hansen's Dairy, Great 
Falls: Hiland Dairy. Springfield. Mo.; 
Economy Food Centers, Evansville; 
and Mississippi Bedding. Jackson. 

More sales: CBS Newsfilm service 
to KGGM-TV, Albuquerque; WOW- 
TV, Omaha; and WKOW-TV, Madi- 
son . . . Felix the Cat sold by Trans- 
Lux TV to KCOP-TV. Los Angeles; 
WCSH-TV. Portland, Me.; WLBZ- 
TV. Bangor; WFBC-TV. Greenville: 
KPHO-TV. Phoenix; WDBO-TV, Or- 
lando; WSTV. Steubenville; WCKT, 
Miami; WTCN, Minneapolis; KPRC- 
TV, Houston; KRNT. Des Moines; 
WBTV, Charlotte; WBTW, Florence; 
and WRGB, Schenectady. 

Feature films: An NTA study of 
feature film usage by stations based 
on 300 responses to a questionnaire 
revealed that independents program 
more than twice as much feature film 
as affiliated stations; that feature film 
use increased in those cities with most 
stations; and that less than 2% of 
stations never use feature films. 



A SIGHT TO SEE! 



KTLE 



CHANNEL 6 



I 




TELEVISION STATION 



BASIC NBC 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

FORJOE & COMPANY 

New York - Chicago - los Angeles - Atlanta 
San Francisco - Philadelphia 



Promotion: Ten Terry toons color 
cartoons will be shown via NBC-RCA 
closed circuit color tv for six weeks 
at the U. S. exhibit in Moscow . . . 
Foley's department store in Houston 
was the scene of a Huckleberry Hound 
promotion for Kellogg's in which a 
record turnout of youngsters was 
noted. 

Commercials: Anderson Craig 

joins Terry toons as director of com- 
mercials . . . Peter A. Griffith to 

Transfilm as tv account executive . . . 
Karl Fischl to Wilding as eastern 
marketing director. 

Strictly personnel : Matthew Rapf 

joins Screen Gems as film producer 
. . . Jeff Davis of Bernard L. Schu- 
bert elected a v.p. of U. S. Junior 
Chamber of Commerce . . . New ac- 
count executives at Telescreen Adver- 
tising subsidiary of Screen Gems are 
Barrett Mayer and Richard Mor- 
ros . . Joining Screen Gems' New 
York publicity staff are Ernie Otto 
as special projects manager and 
Dick Brooks and Bill Kaufman. 

More re people: William F. 
Wallace has been appointed tv tape 
program specialist for Ampex; his 
technical direction of a Fred Astaire 
show won a recent Emmy . . . Leon- 
ard S. Gruenberg has been named 
general manager of NTA Pictures, 
Inc.; a former G-K-S v.p., he joined 
NTA last February . . . Ziv will oc- 
cupy new offices in Dallas in the 
Southland Center; Donald Brog- 
don is sales manager of the division 
there . . . Frank Spiegelman to 
Governor Television Attractions as 
national sales v.p.; he was formerly 
with ITC . . . Richard Carlton, 
Trans-Lux sales v.p., to Chicago for 
conferences . . . ABC Films promoted 
Harry B. Simmons to Chicago city 
sales manager and Bernice Schiffer 
to sales administrator; appointments 
by ABC Films include Lou Mark- 
man, to eastern division representa- 
tive; Howard Routman, to central 
division representative; and Melvin 
Corvin to Western representative . . . 
Ziv has added three to its technical 
staff for the Space series; they are: 
Peter Foy, wire and pulley expert; 
Chesley Bonestell, noted space il- 
lustrator and designer; and William 
Whitely, tv film cameraman. 



NETWORKS 



NBC Radio's latest sales pitch 
directed at the sponsors of 
specials. 

The concept is called Pre-seedii 
and basically has to do with how 
special and the commercials there 
can be exploited both before and j 
ter the telecast via a schedule of m 
work announcements. 

The radio promotion and mercha 
dising would have dealers as well 
tv/radio homes as a target. 

NBC Radio's Monitor has prepar 
a special recording which highligl 
the Monitor-Rambler three year * 
sociation. 

The recording, for exclusive d 
tribution to Rambler dealers, featur 
eye-witness accounts of the maj 
news stories covered by Monit 
newsmen during the past three yeai 
and is aimed to keep dealers informi 
and up-to-date about the Rambl 
showcase. 

Network tv sales: Minute Ma 

(Ted Bates), for the colorcast of tlj 
annual Tournament of Roses P 
rade, 1 Jan. 1960, on NBC TV . 
Greyhound (Grey) and Bulc 
Watch (McCann-Erickson), to c 
sponsor People Are Funny, for tlj 
'59-'60 season. Fri., 7:30-8 p.m. i 
NBC TV . . . More business at NE 
TV: Bordon (Y&R) an addition 
^-hour on alternate Saturday 
The Ruff and Reddy Show; Go 
Seal Co. iCampbell-Mithun), Ka 
ser-Roth Hosiery (Daniel 
Charles), Thomas Leeming (W 
Esty), and Chesebrough-Pom 
(JWT) all for various daytime se 
ments . . . NBC TV clients renewii 
include Brillo (JWT); Standa 
Brands (Compton); Procter & Gai 
ble (Compton I ; Borden, and Ge| 
eral Foods (Benton & Bowles I . J 
Sales at ABC TV: Luden's I J. 3 
Mathes), for participation in Amel 
can Bandstand and four new one-ho 
adventure series; Dutch Masters I 
ears (EW.R&R). for sponsorship 
Take a Good Look, set to debut j 



negro radio for 
mefro new york 



64 



SPONSOR 



18 July 19: 






. . IS THE FOUR-WEEK AVERAGE RATING OF 

KETV's 9:35 p.m. Movie Masterpiece 

IN OMAHA! 

BUY 60-sec. SPOTS IN PRIME MOVIE TIME 

The June, 1959 Nielsen credits 

KETV's 9:35 P.M. MOVIE MASTERPIECE 

with a striking rating victory . . . night after 
night throughout the year, KETV programs 
Omaha's finest feature films! 

BUY HOT 20s IN THE MIDDLE OF 
THESE GREAT NEW ABC-TV SHOWS: 



Monday 

• BOURBON STREET 

BEAT 

• CHEYENNE 

• ADVENTURES IN 

PARADISE 



Tuesday 

• BRONCO/ 

SUGARFOOT 

Wednesday 

• HAWAIIAN EYE 




Calf 




now. 1 



C-^^OwwwcJ2x 



7 



Thursday 

• THE UNTOUCHABLES 

Friday 

• 77 SUNSET STRIP 



Ben H. Cowdery, President 

Eugene S. Thomas, V.P. & Gen. Mgr. 

ABC TELEVISION NETWORK 

Omaha World-Herald Station 



iPONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 



65 



Oct., 10:30-11 p.m., and General 
Mills (Knox Reeves) for national 
sponsorship, Hamm Brewing (Camp- 
bell-Mithunj for Western regional 
and National Brewing (W. B. Doner) 
for Eastern regional sponsorship of 
Saturday Night Pro Football, for 
seven weeks commencing 22 Aug. 

Network radio sale: R. J. Reynolds 
(Wm. Esty), for sponsorship of 
Weekday News with Arthur Van 
Horn, ABC Radio, Mon.-Fri., 6:40- 
6:45 p.m., effective 13 July. 

Title change: Undercover Man, de- 
buting 1 Sept. on CBS TV, for Phar- 
maceuticals, Inc. (Parkson Advertis- 
ing ) , to Tightrope. 

New radio affiliations: WVET, 
Rochester, with NBC, effective 1 Aug. 
. . . Keystone added these six stations: 
WJBD, Salem, 111.; WLBI, Denham 
Springs, La.; WIOS, Tawas City, 
Mich.; KQDI, Bismarck, N. D.; 
KURY, Brookings, Ore., and WWRI, 
West Warwick, R. I. 

Note from Mutual: Mutual Affili- 
ates Advisory Committee is holding a 
series of regional meetings aimed at 
bringing about closer cooperation be- 
tween Mutual stations. 

Personnel appointment : Robert F. 
Davis, director of research, CBS TV 
stations division. 



RADIO STATIONS 



Most American adults feel that 
tv will never entirely replace 
radio in the home. 

This was revealed through a special 
question inserted in a May national, 
personal interview study of 2,500 
families conducted by R. H. Bruskin 
Associates. 

The question asked and the find- 
ings obtained in 2,508 calls: "Do 
you think that you will continue to 
listen to the radio, or do you think 
that tv will entirely replace radio 
listening in your home?" 
Continue listening to radio 81% 

Tv will replace radio 18% 

Don't know 1% 

The same study found that only 
about 15% of all Americans say they 
do no radio listening on the average 
day, while 47% say that they listen 
for one hour or more each day. 



A new Pulse 28-market survey 
showed that out-of-home radio 
listening during the past winter 
registered a gain of 7% over 
1958, and added 26% to the in- 
home audience. 

Highest levels of out-of-home listen- 
ing were recorded in the Boston, New 
York and Los Angeles areas, where 
5.0% of all radio families reported 
out-of-home listening during the av- 



erage 



y 4 -h 



bet 



ween six a.m. anc 



midnight. 

As a comparison, figures for 1951 
showed that out-of-home listening 
added only 13.7% to the in-home au- 
dience — about half of the current fig- 
ure. 

ABC Radio and Philco jointly 
demonstrated this week an am 
compatible stereophonic broad- 
casting system developed by the 
manufacturer. 

The broadcast, which was over 
WABC, marked the first using of 
the Philco equipment. 

Philco disclosed that it was ready 
to market the new compatible stereo- 
phonic am receivers as soon as the 
FCC approves standards for the sys- 
tem. 

Ideas at work: 

• KJNX, Los Angeles, is circulat- 
ing a data book concerned with the 
Los Angeles market. The 32-page 
booklet features maps, charts and dia- 
grams of statistical findings on popu- 
lation figures, new construction, agri- 
culture, buving income, retail sales, 
trade, industry, employment, traffic 
and the weather. 

• WBAL, Baltimore, reports that 
more than 400 people a day have been 
calling up to participate in the 
"You're On the Air" contest. Indi- 
viduals who telephone in are told to 
repeat a promotional phrase, which 
may then be played back over the air 
at an unspecified future time. Those 
who recognize themselves and call 
back within a half-hour, are awarded 
portable transistor radios. 

• KYW, Cleveland, is giving its 
sales representatives unique calling 
cards. On the reverse side of the 
cards, space is provided for the vital 
statistical information requisite to 
giving the little woman a fitting gift. 

• WPEN, Philadelphia, is send- 
ing out a brochure promoting its new 
TSR (Tell 'em, Sell 'em, Re-Tell 'em) 
plan for selling newscasts. WPEN 



plans to sell newscasts in much th 
same way as it sells spot. The newi 
casts, with standard opening, con 
mercial and closing, will be offere 
on floating schedules, available fc 
short or long flights. 

Thisa 'n' data: Harry S. Gooc 

man is distributing five five-minut 
shows and 20 one-minute shows mad 
by Cal Tinney . . . Northern Cal 
fornia fm broadcasters have tal 
en steps to organize an organizatio 
whose function it would be to promot 
fm broadcasting throughout td 
Northern California area . . . Saki 
personnel and managers associate; 
with Taft Broadcasting met recenj 
ly to discuss the sales picture at th 
local level, with emphasis on intern; 
sales development, together with pad 
age plans for summer selling . . 
WNOB-FM, Cleveland, went on th 
air 14 July, with 17^2 hours of cor 
tinuous programing daily . . . Ele< 
trie League of Los Angeles figure 
on radio set distribution for seve: 
Southern California counties fc 
May of this year showed a 23% ir 
crease over the same period last yea 
. . . RAB reports that shopping cer 
ters are using radio in campaigns t 
lure trade away from the downtow 
stores. 

Personnel appointments: Juditl 
Lawton, named dir. in charge sale 
promotion, advertising and publicity 
KFI, Los Angeles, Cal. . . Ralph S 
Hartman, station mgr., and Te 
Hepburn, commercial sales mgr 
WHGB, Harrisburg, Pa. . . . Jacl 
son Fleming, manager, KGW. Por 
land, Ore. . . . M. A. Lewis, <tf>i 
mgr., KPNG, Port Neches, Tex. . . 
Arthur Thomas, station mgi 
KCCT, Corpus Christi, Texas . . Jii 
Fox, assistant sales mgr., KFMB, Sa 
Diego . . . Tom Underwood, res 
dent mgr., WSOL, Tampa . . . Joh 
Hartigan, account executive, Ke\l 
stone Broadcasting, Chicago office. . 
Jack Stahle, sales mgr., KGO, Sa 
Francisco . . . Edwin Schulz, get 
eral manager. KXLA, Los Angele 
. . . Sidney Magelof, station mat 
ager, WEZL, Richmond, Va. . . 
Richard Garesche, sales promotio 
mgr., KXCK, St. Louis. 

More station staffers: Mrs. Th< 
ola Sanders named director of oij 
erations, KFWB, Los Angeles, Ca 
. . . Dene Voigt, general office mar 






66 



SPONSOR 



18 july 195 



...i. \\ K AW, Evanston, 111. . . . 
cm is C. Jainieson, local sales man- 
rer, WQAM, Miami, Fla. . . . 
eorge R. Oliviere, commercial 
anager, WOL, Washington, D. C. 

esignation: Blanche Stein, from 
rector of station relations, Keystone 
■ Mi hasting System, Chicago. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



NTA-TV, New York, and 
MSP-TV, Minneapolis, have 
oth gone with Adam Young. 

That gives Young 17 tv stations 
'id in line with the addition of the 
!,o NTA stations the firm is expand- 

o it> New York sales staff and Chi- 

go 1 1 ua iters. 

ppointments : WTUG, Tusca- 
osa, Ala., to National Time Sales 
. . WALT, Tampa. Fla., to Gill- 
erna. 

bisa 'n' data: Adam Young, 

king over KIOA, Des Moines, cele- 
rated by holding a special drawing 
the station, with the winners re- 
living ringside seats to the recent 
atterson-Johansson fight . . . Mov- 
ig to larger quarters : The Atlan- 
h office of Peters, Griffin, Wood- 
'ard; H-R in San Francisco, and 
enard, Rintoul & McConnell in 
liiiago. 

ersonnel appointments: Frank 
leed, named account executive, 
■ eed Radio, Chicago . . . Kenneth 
ampbell, account executive, Bran- 
am. New York . . . Thomas Daw- 
on, director of sales promotion and 
^search, CBS TV Spot Sales. 



TV STATIONS 



lusiness is so good on WRCA- 
"V, NBC's New York key, that 
*8 going to program a live show 
ollowing Jack Paar starting this 

,11. 

It will be 15 minutes of Dr. Joyce 
rothers, a psychologist who will deal 
ith questions of human behavior. 

Vgain, the extended post-midnight 

•heduiing will give the station an 

pportunih to absorb some of the 

Jiounting demand for fringe time 

linutes. 



The equal time controversy (Sec- 
tion 315) has had repercussions 
in Hawaii. 

It all centered around a demand by 
a gubernatorial hopeful. Delegate 
Burns, for equal time on KGMB, 
Honolulu, on the ground that his 
rival. Governor O/uinn, had announced 
his candidacy during a regular inter- 
view program on that station. 

KGMB countered that the program 
was entirely of a public service na- 
ture and rejected Burns' request. 

Noted KGMB's Frank Warren: the 
equal time ruling can only serve to 
handicap and embarrass stations in 
their scheduling and airing of regu- 
lar news and public affairs programs, 
with the public the loser. 

Thisa 'n' data: When the coaxial 
cable broke in New Orleans, WWL- 
TV filled the nighttime gap with live 
jazz combinations . . . Taft Broad- 
casting common stock was offered 
to the public last week by Harriman 
Ripley & Co., at $15 per share . . . 
WOW-TV-AM, Omaha, is set to 
break ground on a new studio and 
offices, 29 Aug., the station's 10th an- 
niversary . . . WLOS-TV, Asheville, 
N. C, has opened offices in Green- 
ville . . . Gross Telecasting, Inc., 
has declared a regular quarterly divi- 
dend of 40 cents per share on com- 
mon stock and 7% cents per share of 
class B common stock . . . WJZ-TV, 
Baltimore, has successfully completed 
its "I want to Win a Dodge for Dad" 
contest, conducted in conjunction with 
the city's Dodge dealers, via Brahms- 
Gerber Advertising, the Baltimore 
agency that three months ago ac- 
quired the Dodge account from Grant 
Advertising, New York. 

Kudos: WNEM-TV, Bay City, 

Mich., a certificate of appreciation, 
for the educational program. Pin- 
point, from the Michigan Education 
Association . . . KMOX-TV, St. 
Louis, a promotion participation 
award from the Crusade lor Freedom. 

Personnel appointments: Antho- 
ny Bello, sales mgr., KMON, St. 
Louis . . . Joseph Constantino, di- 
rector of sales promotion and mer- 
chandising. KTVU. Oakland . . . Wil- 
liam Dustin, regional sales mgr., 
WAVY -TV. Portsmouth, Va Les- 
lie Peard, director of regional sales 
development. Triangle stations, t^ 



VOGT 

[continual from page 13) 

of obtaining local information on a 
variety of subjects including all phases 
of major consumer item categories 
plus a knowledge of the part each 
retail and wholesale outlet plays in 
the economy of the market. A 
thorough knowledge of the habits of 
the community's population also is of 
great assistance. 

Our WISN radio facility recent- 
ly obtained a schedule from Sutton 
Cosmetics, principallv because we 
showed the agency how well informed 
we were regarding the status of the 
client's distribution and the general 
pattern of the deodorant business in 
Milwaukee. In this case the agency 
frankly admitted we had more infor- 
mation than their client was able to 
furnish. 

The information provided to Sut- 
ton by WISN: Sutton, with a stick 
deodorant, was introducing the roll- 
on type. It was therefore interested 
in the fact that 92% of all wom- 
en and 63% of the men in the Wil- 
waukee market used deodorants. Of 
the women, 28% used roll-on and 
15% stick; of the men, 31' r stick and 
14% roll-on. Sutton Stick was used 
last year by approximately 5% of all 
women deodorant users. 4'* of all 
men users. Sutton's distribution in- 
cluded drug chains, all three major 
department stores and 80' i of the 
independent retailers. 

Promotion services: This is the 
second category of merchandising ac- 
tivity. For small spot advertisers' 
schedules it becomes impossible to go 
thoroughly into merchandising pro- 
motions in all cases, so the only help 
which can be extended economically 
will be mailings, tie-in ads or some 
other method of informing the trade 
of the advertising. 

Merchandising assistance at the 
wholesale distributor level is "true" 
merchandising and. as such, will gen- 
eral!) be limited to advertisers with 
rather substantial schedules. There 
are exceptions to this, however. \\ ISN 
radio has increased a Shullon Old 
Spice schedule considerably by (1) 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



I'ONSOl! 



18 july 1959 



67 



calling on the distributor. (2 I helping 
him work out a retailer display con- 
test and (3) agreeing to judge the 
entries. The cost was minor when 
related to increased revenue. 

Wholesale distribution : Merchan- 
dising at the distributor level is 
best used for items or industries with 
the major portion of their retail out- 
lets in unorganized independents. In 
Milwaukee this particularly applies to 
the drug industry, where we have 
only o' ( of all retail outlets in or- 
ganized chains. The remaining 300- 
plus stores are independent. It is 
difficult to control in-store display 
through independent outlets, so we 
take our problem to the wholesaler. 

In this same category are various 
"gimmicks" sometimes used to attract 
attention of chain buyers in order to 
speed retail distribution. These take 
many forms, but currently we are 
using an electronic secretary with a 
three-minute recording of one of our 
personalities giving a pitch for an 
advertiser's product. 

This sales presentation can in- 
clude sales points which a client 
desires, plus a commercial found on 
the air schedule. The sales representa- 



tive dials a telephone number and 
hands the phone to the buyer. South- 
ern Sun orange juice, R. G. Dunn 
cigars and Remington shavers are 
clients who have made use of this. 

Retail assistance: The most ex- 
pensive and the most effective step 
that can be taken to increase sales in 
todays self-service marketplace is 
the improvement of display size and 
location of an advertiser's wares in 
retail outlets. Exchange facility agree- 
ments handle this activity nicely but 
merchandising experience is essential. 
Too often chain display contracts are 
neither properly drawn nor effective- 
ly administered. 

The first mistake is to regard these 
arrangements as station promotion 
and forget that their use makes sta- 
tion sales agents of advertisers. And 
this subjects them to a new and un- 
familiar state and federal laws. The 
second error: the price per promotion 
can get fantastically high. With ex- 
perienced merchandising personnel 
handling our contracts at WISN, AM- 
TV, all retailers are solicited as a 
matter of policy and the price per pro- 
motion is realistic. 

It is here in chain store offices that 



llliii W* 



l1illli!tiiliUi!liCIiliiIifliilil|l|||l||ili 

iiiiiii Willi i#f^ : i. : : 




It works like a charm to say PRESTO— the first name in instantaneous recording 
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isn't PRESTO-perfect? 

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V^f) Since 1934 the world's most carefully made recording discs and equipment. 



a side effect of cordial relations with 
giant retailers makes itself felt. In 
many large unit offices advertisers' 
representatives are not allowed ta 
contact executives on the sales and 
supervisory staff; they are limited to 
calling on buyers. 

Yet it is in this very important sales 
office that decisions are made regard- 
ing items to be featured and promo- 1 
tions to be run. And this is the office 
and the persons whom stations have as 
their normal contacts. A station with! 
cordial chain relations can be a valu- 
able ally. 

The actions and attitudes of agen- 
cies also play a great part in the prop- 
er or improper use of a merchandis- 
ing program. 

The majority of agencies have 
recognized that their services to 
clients must include more than the 
mechanical creation and placing of 
advertising. The advertising function 
is complex and interlaced with allil 
elements of the marketing picture" 

Many agencies have established 
marketing and/or merchandising de- 
partments with their own staffs for 
calling on advertiser's district offices, 
media and other organizations which 
can help a client's sales picture. 

These agencies are easier to work 
with than those which insist on the 
age-old channels of station-national 
rep-timebuyer-account man-client anc 
back again. On the rare occasion) 
when an agency has sent in a young 
inexperienced zealot, we've been abl 
to assist in his education by arrang 
ing an out-of-offiee-hours intervie\ 
with a chain buyer. 

There's a place in the station met 
chandising story for all who sincerel 
desire to assist their clients, be I 
agencies or media. We exist for oral 
reason: to increase sales and profit 
of our advertisers. The agency dj 
station which forgets that is on trr 
way out. 

Merchandising is just one way-) 
but a very effective way — for a st 
tion to say, "Thanks for your bus 
ness; we'd like to see you back 
They come back. too. again an 
again. d 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



68 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1991 



TV SPECIALS 

[continued from page 30) 

president for programing; at ABC, is 
with talent. "A good, $2,000 comedi- 
an these days is getting $12,500," he 
says. But the cost increase means a 
slimmer margin of profit for the 
packager, who has for years been 
able to make a spectacular profit on 
the sale of his program. Mr. Moore 
thinks packages will absorb the addi- 
tional costs rather than pass them 
along to sponsors because specials 
costs are already astronomical. And 
a CBS spokesman made this point: 
"We can easily hit the point of di- 
minishing returns in specials. There's 
just so much an advertiser can carry 
and even the biggest gate-getters can 
price themselves out of the market." 

Sponsors are far from scared off. 
however. They're flocking into spe- 
cials lineups. At this point, still some- 
what early in the fall selling game, 
there are 30 national advertisers who 
have contracted for these big shows 
(see full list in chart at end of this 
story). Yet only 34 sponsors bought 
specials in the entire '58-'59 season. 

What's the reason for the influx? 
There are many, says Herbert Sussan, 
director of special programs for NBC. 
Bigger and better stars and properties 
are being attracted to tv for the first 
time because of the appeal of the spe- 
cials format. He says there's no lack 
of properties or top-draw stars (wit- 
ness the signing of four Ernest Hem- 
ingway productions for CBS, dra- 
matic offerings of Maxwell Anderson 
and Budd Schulberg. the possibility 
of Marlene Dietrich and Marilyn 
Monroe emceeing shows). 

As he puts it. "The creative people 
— writers, directors, performers — are 
geared to a single Broadway show or 
a gate-smashing single movie. They 
don't understand or respond to a 
regular, week-in and week-out tv 
series in most cases. But they like 
the money and the quality which go 
into specials, by their very definition. 
So they're listening seriously when 
they're approached to be a specials 
gate-getter." 

This means national advertisers as 
never before have the opportunity to 
bave the biggest boxoffice stars work 
for them in attracting gigantic audi- 
ences for their sales messages. A 
rundown of the shows specifically- 
scheduled for fall (see adjacent 
chart) shows an array of star-studded 



material from highly intellectual of- 
ferings such as Shakespeare's Temp- 
est to a rock "n roll session with Elvis 
Presley when he returns from the 
army next spring. 

Of 192 shows specifically blue- 
printed and slotted, 66 are in the 
dramatic class and 56 of the music- 
variety type — about two-thirds of the 
total program fare indicating the con- 
tinuing appeal of these formats. There 
are 41 comedy shows scheduled. 12 
news and special events, 10 documen- 
tary, 6 science and 1 sports. (These 
figures are incomplete since they rep- 
resent only the shows pinned-down as 
of 7 July. I 

Network spokesmen at CBS and 
NBC tend to agree that the problems 
of telecasting this huge number of 
elaborate productions center on two 
focal points: facilities and creative 
personnel. NBC is confronted with 
the biggest problem in scheduling 
studios, equipment and crews to pro- 
duce nearly four specials a week. It's 
adding color studios both in Holly- 
wood and in New York inasmuch as 
95% of its special programing will 
be in color, and it has heavy installa- 
tions of tv tape machines. 

Mr. Sussan estimates almost 95' < 
of his networks specials will be live 
or on tape, terms which he considers 
interchangeable, because tape produc- 
tion techniques — unlike film — do not 
differ from live methods. He thinks 
tape has made possible the rush of 
specials available for sponsorship be- 
cause of the mobility and variety of 
situations which can be translated to 
the programs. Remote shows, for 
example, take the pressure off shoot- 
ing crews and studio facilities in ma- 
jor production centers. 

But the other problem of maintain- 
ing sufficiently trained and profes- 
sional creative people — writers, pro- 
ducers and directors who are respon- 
sible for the end result of a special — 
is not so readily solved. "Everything 
else can be called down." sa\s Mr. 
Sussan. "facilities, money, stars, 
properties. But you can't order up 
out of the ground a crew of people 
who can blend all these elements and 
come up with a package which makes 
the advertiser's investment of half a 
million dollar payoff." 

As he points out: "You can't put 
an untrained, untried producer — no 
matter how brilliant in potential— on 
an expensive property. The answer 
is to seek out talent, give it an oppor- 



yiiiiniii 



NEXT 
1 SEASON'S 

SPONSORS* 

(Listed by product category with 
the total number represented in 
each group.) 

AUTOMOTIVE. AUTO PRODUCTS 7 

AC Spark Plugs N* 
Buick C, N 
= Chevrolet A 
OldsmobUe A 
Pontiac N 
United Motors N 
Zerex (DuPont) V 

JEWELERS' ITEMS 4 

M Benrus C 

Sheaffer pen \ 
/ . S. Time A. \ 
Westclox N 

DRUCS, TOILETRIES 3 

■ Breck A 
Revlon C 
Retail N 

FOOD AND CONFECTIONS 3 



General Mills A, N 
Mars Candy A 
Whitman Candy C 



APPLIANCES 2 

Bell & Howell C 
Oster Mis. A 



BEVERAGES 2 

Brewers' Foundation \ 
Carting's Ale C 



TOBACCO 1 

R. J. Reynolds C 



MISCELLANEOUS 8 

Academy of TV Arts, Sciences \ 

American Gas Assn. C 

Allstate Insurance C 

Bell Telephone \ 

DuPont < 

Equitable Insurance N 

Hal I mar I. \ 

Minnesota Mining A 



• Thesi M of S 

July. Lattai i A, C or N ifter i llent'a 
name refet to program sponsorship on 

the tin. i n, twi rks 1B( I BS an I n Bi 



niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini!" 



SPONSOR 



18 july 1959 



69 



CHECK (/and 
DOUBLE CHECK £ 



V 

WTHI-TV offers the 
lowest cost per thousand 
of all Indiana TV 
stations! 

V 

One hundred and eleven 
national and regional 
spot advertisers know that 
the Terre Haute market is 
not covered effectively 
by outside TV. 

WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL IO • CBS — ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 




INDIANA 



Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 



Hot Springs, Ark. 

Pop. 33,800 

is larger than 

Midland, Texas 

Pop. 64,700 

in General Merchandise Sales 

La Crosse, Wise. 
Pop. 79,700 

in Drug Store Sales 

Sheboygan, Wise. 

Pop. 91,900 

in Apparel Store Sales 

Ask Us "Why" 

KBHS 

5000 watts at 590 kc 

113 Third St., Hot Springs, Ark. 



tunity on regularly scheduled pro- 
graming, move people forward as fast 
as they can take it." 

A show failure in specials, he 
charges, is never attributable to lack 
of money, lack of equipment or lack 
of stars in a property. The single 
reason for failure: lack of talent. 

The essence of specials is show- 
manship, and this is what the net- 
work and independent producers 
strive to put across to the show- 
struck audience. Most of the specials 
have as a basic ingredient of show- 
manship the appearance of a sure- 
fire boxoffice attraction. Why? Be- 
cause a one-shot is necessarily fleet- 
ing: it has one chance to make an 
impression and to capture an audi- 
ence. That's why the average special 
costs a client $500,000 when adver- 
tising, promotion and publicity are 
added in to the over-all effort. 

The excitement of a special has 
affected stars as well, which is why 
the Marlon Brandos, Jimmy Stewarts 
and Ingrid Bergmans are sitting in 
on an ever-increasing number of tv 
conferences. For the first time in the 
short history of specials, they're able 
to get the price they've been asking 
for the past couple of seasons. And 
for the first time they are personally 
excited at the prospect of a major 
vehicle which gives them the best 
showcase in terms of reaching mass 
audiences with a quality production. 

Specials are of interest only to the 
biggest advertisers, however. The 
most royal of the blue chips are — 
for the foreseeable future — tin' only 
prospects for these big-money shows. 
An analysis of next season's sponsors 
signed as of now, shows the biggesl 
product group represented is automo- 
tives (Buick, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile, 
Pontiac, among others), followed by 
the fast-turnover items manufactured 
in the jewelry and accessory classifi- 
cation — Benrus. U. S. Time and 
Westclox. Of the 30 network adver- 
tisers, seven are in the automotive 
class, four in jewelry items, three 
each in drugs-toiletries and food-con- 
fections, two each in appliances and 
beverages, one in tobacco and eight 
in miscellaneous categories. ^ 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



BR 

10 



II 
(1 

It 






TV TAPE 

(continued from page 39) 

If the request is for a show that 
hasn't yet become a part of the TvAR 
library, it can be seen within 24 
hours; tapes are flown in at once. 

And if an agency asks for a special 
testing commercial featuring the per- 
sonality of a local show handling 
and expounding on its own produc 
then the audition will take a litt 
longer — two or three days. 

The rep firm has one whole roo 
devoted to the tape equipment am 
library, another large conference 
room that can accommodate an en- 
tire media department. 

The tape equipment is expected to 
be especially valuable in the area of 
acquainting the agency people in 
New York with the scope of public 
service programing on the Westing- 
house stations. It is very difficult to 
explain to someone who has never 
seen a certain show of this type what 
it's like. Simply to say, "It's about 
delinquency" or, "It's on geriatrics" 
can lead the non-viewer to think, 'T 
bet it's deadly." But with the tape 
recorder at TvAR, admen now can 
see for themselves, evaluate the shows 
for both service and entertainment. 

An example of this is the new 
KYW-TV, Cleveland, public service 
program, Mental Health. Word has 
been spreading from Cleveland about 
this show. TvAR has been getting 
many requests to see it, is showing 
it on tape to requestees. 

Within the same area of public 
service shows, here are some other 
WBC originations which are at- 
tracting attention among admen. 

Reading Out Loud, another KYW 
program, features such celebrities as 
Jose Ferrer, David Niven and Senator) 
John F. Kennedy. Kennedy, for ex 
ample, reads a transcript of the Re- 
publican Convention at which Lin 
coin was nominated. To describe it| 
orally would be hard; on tape, its) 
entertainment value comes through. 

This fall, from the same source, 
comes a new Civil War series via 
tape, featuring pictures by the famed 
Matthew Brady. 

Reaction of N. Y. admen has been 
enthusiastic. The tape recorders at 
the offices in 666 Fifth Avenue, has 
established almost a party flavor to 
the business of timebuying. But the 
tape recorder will gradually assume 
a more workaday role. 






70 



SPONSOR 



18 july 1959 



RISTOL MYERS 

(continued from page 37) 

uf stations necessary in each market 
to give 40-50% penetration per 
month and 60-70% lor the entire 
ampaign (6 weeks). Since Trig was 
after grooming hours primarily, all 
time was bought between 6:30-8:30 
a.m. except where lack of availabili- 
ties or lower cost packages in late 
afternoon traffic times dictated this 
sort of buy. Minutes were bought in 
and adjacent to news-weather-sports. 
In most cases, discounts were avail- 
able on the strength of other Bristol- 
Myers billing. (See box page 37 for 
rundown of Trig buying strategy!) 

Another important consideration 
was a device to stimulate d.j. interest 
and enthusiasm, to get the maximum 
benefit from the fact sheet, and to 
merchandise the whole effort to 
Bristol-Myers salesmen and the trade. 

Solution: a contest, open to all 
d.j.'s on the schedule, in which they 
would compete with each other on 
how effectively they could put across 
the points in the fact sheets. Because 
preliminaries in the contest should 
be judged locallv. and to involve 
Bristol-Myers salesmen in it, the 
salesmen became the judges. 

Salesmen listen to d.j.'s like any- 
one else — on the radio, while shav- 
ing and getting ready for work. 
While on the job, they consult with 
chain buyers, store managers, rack 
jobbers about their preferences. "This 
carries the old concept of merchan- 
dising your spot schedule to the buy- 
er a step further," says Eastman. 
"What we're doing is actually involv- 
ing the buyer in the selection of the 
contest winner. Everyone likes to be 
a critic — it's only human nature. If 
we can make him aware of the sched- 
ule, we'll get an opinion from him." 

Making the buyer aware of the 
schedule isn't being left to chance. 
Part of the recorded pitch that East- 
man, Koehler and Leonard made to 
the 180 stations asks that the d.j. get 
out and meet the buyers personally, 
tell them about the schedule. "After 
all," says Eastman, "d.j.'s are celebri- 
ties and buyers are interested in see- 
ing what they look like, talking to 
them. If the d.j. and the buyer 
haven't gotten together by now. this 
contest gives them a bona fide oppor- 
tunity to do so. They'll have some- 
thing definite to talk about and. since 
the buver is a factor in selection of 



the contest winner, it certainly can't 
do the d.j. any harm." 

Here are the mechanics of the Trig 
contest: 

• One d.j. will be selected in each 
market of up to four stations; in mar- 
kets of five stations or more, there 
will be two qualifiers. This means 
about 50 d.j.'s will compete in the 
final judging. 

• To facilitate final judging, to be 
done by an SRA-selected panel, each 
d.j. submits a tape taken from the air 
at a time of his choosing anytime dur- 
ing the last four weeks of the first 
wave of Trig spots. 

Has the contest idea generated en 
thusiasm and, more importantly 
sales advantages? 

Bristol-Myers admen are unani 
mous in their feeling that it has 
"Take Kansas City," says Eastman 
"where one station and its d.j. are 
out, not just rounding up votes, but 
actually trying to get us uniform 
stocking of both Trig sizes in a lead- 
ing chain, no less." 

Don S. Frost, Bristol-Myers v.p. 
and director of advertising I This 
week elevated to the post of v.p. in 
charge of executive staff activities), 



sees these advantages accruing to 
Trig from d.j. endorsements: "The 
consumer doesn't regard his endorse- 
ment as a paid testimonial," says 
Frost, "and with the contest running, 
the buyer looked upon the d.j.'s sell- 
ing effort as a personal thing. We feel 
we're establishing a rapport on the 
local selling scene that's going to go 
far beyond its benefits to Trig." 

He notes that additional on-the-air 
promotion for the schedule has ex- 
ceeded expectations — the most effec- 
tive centering on consumer contests 
like those tried out in Boston and 
Providence. 

Frost has one particular warning 
for advertisers using fact sheets — and 
that is: require air checks "to make 
sure the d.j., in his zeal, isn't tram- 
pling on your image. It's all very 
human — and in a contest, more so 
than ever — for a d.j. to concoct a 
wild idea that may be far from the 
facts you're duty-bound to get across." 

Results of the current flight of 
spots will strongly affect merchan- 
dising plans for the second flight, due 
to begin mid-September, and will 
doubtless influence the company's 
future plans in spot radio. ^ 




NO, THIS IS "KNOE-LAND" 

(embracing industrial, progressive North Louisiana, South Arkansas, 
West Mississippi) 



JUST LOOK AT THIS MARKET DATA 



Drug Sales 
Automotive Sales 
General Merchandise 
Total Retail Sales 



40,355,000 
299,539,000 
148,789,000 



$1,286,255,000 



Population 1,520,100 

Households 423,600 

Consumer Spendable Income 

$1,761,169,000 
Food Sales $ 300,486,000 

KNOE-TV AVERAGES 78.5% SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

According to April 1959 ARB we average 78.5% share of audience from Sign On to Sign Off 
7 days a week. During 361 weekly quarter hours it runs 80% to 100%. and for 278 weekly 

quarter hours 92% to 100%. 



SPONSOR 



18 JULY 1959 



KNOE-TV 

Channel 8 
Monroe, Louisiana 

Photo: "Greenville Mill, Division of Mnhasro Industries, Inc.". (i reemille 
forttirers of the finest carpets and riiijs. 



CBS • A B C 

A James A. Noe Station 

Represented by 

H-R Television, Inc. 



" 



WCTV 



Solves 
Another Problem 

for a district manager 




Dave's sales skipped markets he 
knew had people. 



*&?£? 










His sales manager was a most 
unreasonable man. 




S%%\ 



Joe Hosford showed him that 
big-city coverage is not enough, 
said Atlanta is 212 miles away, 
and Jacksonville is 158, sug- 
gested that he use WCTV to fill 
the gap. 




Blair TV Associates made a trip 
to the agency. 




Now Dave has fun on weekends. 



WCTV 



Tallahassee 
Thomasville 



for North Fla. and South Ga. 

John H. Phipps 
Broadcasting Stations 



72 






Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 








William Lyons takes over the post of ad- 
vertising manager for the U.S. division of 
Max Factor & Co. He will headquarter at 
the company's home office in Hollywood, 
where his duties will involve all the Max 
Factor products marketed in the United 
States. A 10-year veteran in advertising 
and marketing, Lyons was previously with 
the Toni Co. in Chicago as brand manager 
and earlier with Benton & Bowles, Inc., as an account executive. Lyons 
is a graduate of M.I.T. and holds a degree in Business Admin. 

Tony Bello has been named sales manager 
of KMOX (CBS), St. Louis. Bello's 
career in broadcasting began in 1946, when 
he joined a local radio station as announc- 
er, following his discharge from the Air 
Force. He came to KMOX in 1953, work- 
ing himself up from merchandising man- 
ager to account executive. Prior to his new 
appointment, Bello was national sales man- 
ager for CBS o&o. His private life activities include membership in the 
Media Club Adv. Club of St. Louis, and in the Assoc, of Mfrs. Reps. 

Herbert W. Hobler has joined Videotape 
Productions of New York, Inc., as director 
of sales development. He was v.p. in charge 
of sales for Teleprompter Corp. until a year 
ago, when he became a sales management 
consultant. Earlier, he was with NBC and 
CBS TV as sales executive. Hobler lives in 
Princeton, N. J., with his wife and four 
children. He is p.r. chairman of United 
Community Fund and a board member of YMCA. His father, A. W, 
Hobler, is chairman of the exec, committee at Benton & Bowles. 

Sidney Magelof has been appointed sta- 
tion manager of WEZL, Richmond. For- 
merly, Magelof was with WUST, WEAM 
and WGMS in the capacities of account ex- 
ecutive and general manager. Before en- 
tering radio in 1951, he was in retail and 
wholesale merchandising with headquarters 
in Georgia. WEZL, purchased in January 
of this year by Ben Strouse (now presi- 
dent), Samuel E. Feldman and Leon B. Back, is a 5,000 watt inde- 
pendent station, similar to WWDC, and features music, news and sports. 





SPONSOR 



18 JULY 1959 i 



(VOS TV dominates 



Canada's 3rd Market 

ONE MILLION British Columbians 
in "A" contour... 

262,000 T.V. Homes 



Its affiliation with the giant CBS network gives 
KVOS TV unique entertainment power . . . gives 
this station the ability to deliver the most 
popular daytime and night-time shows to B.C. 
viewers. Add to this the top syndicated half 
hour shows, award-winning special features and 
sports events and the largest selection of fine 
movies on TV in North America! This kind of 
entertainment power makes KVOS TV the No. 1 
audience station, gives you selling power to 
"talk to" Canada's 3rd market. 
Plus 92,000 TV homes in 
Northwest Washington 




KVOS TV 







one TV station had to be unique 



T 



VANCOUVER OFFICES— 1687 W. Broadway, REgent 8-514-1 
STOVIN-BYLES LIMITED— Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg 
FORJOE TV INC. — New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
ART MOORE and ASSOCIATES— Seattle, Portland 



SPONSOR • 18 JULY 1959 



73 




SPONSOR 



Watch for Air Media Basics 

Next week you will receive with your copy of sponsor 
what we helieve is the most practical and valuable handbook 
of air media facts ever put together for timebuyers, adver- 
tising managers, account men and media directors. 

We are especially proud of our new Air Media Basics, a 
232-page collection of important charts, tables and vital sta- 
tistics about all phases of radio and tv, compiled by our 
Special Projects Editor, Alfred Jaffe. We are certain you 
will find it a year-round help in your air media planning. 

It is a successor to Fall Facts, which sponsor has pub- 
lished for 12 years, and represents a completely new ap- 
proach. It is neither a yearbook, nor a summary of predic- 
tions about the coming season, but a compilation of 100% 
use material which you will find valuable during the whole 
of 1959-60. Watch for Air Media Basics, and let us know if 
you would like additional copies. 

Applause for a Contemporary 

Among the many little-known but important services 
rendered to the public by the broadcasting industry is the 
"sponsorship" of a series of educational programs delineat- 
ing the work of the United Nations in many lands. 

Recently we attended a luncheon outlining the second-year 
plan for this series. The first group of thirteen 15-minute pro- 
grams had been completed with 52 tv stations participating. 
The second season's plan called for half hours. 

What impressed us especially was not the close liaison be- 
tween UN officials and broadcasters — including such notables 
as Don McGannon, P. A. Sugg, Ed Wheeler, Roger Clipp. 
Dody Sinclair — nor the fact that each station paid substantial- 
ly for its participation, but the interesting notation that the 
series was "jelled" by a trade paper publisher. One UN 
dignitary even referred to it as the "Fred Kugel network." 
Our hat is off to an enterprising and public-spirited publisher. 



THIS WE FIGHT FOR: Greater understand- 
ing of the role of the radio/ tv station represent- 
ative in today's air media world. His value 
and functions have increased far more rapidly 
than has the industry's knowledge about him. 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Crisis: Philadelphia radio station 
WPEN's Larry Brown has a seven- 
year-old son who is spending his first 
summer at camp. Larry's wife, Alma, 
got her first message from Garry early 
last week, a post card that read : "Dear 
Mother, Happy Summer. I need a 
belt for camp or my pants will fall 
down. Love, Garry." 

Creative: Why aren't truck drivers 
advertising copywriters? Here are 
two signs painted on the rear ends of 
trucks that recently parked along 
Madison Ave.— HAVE WIFE WITH 
GUN, MUST TRAVEL, and ... . 
WATCH MY TAIL— NOT HERS. 

Air sense: Following is from an 
inter-office memo at WJIM & WJIM- 
TV, in Lansing, Mich. — 

TO: Radio announcers. 

FROM: Howard W. Coleman, Asst. to 
Pres. 

This is to remind you that radio as 
a major medium is but 35 or so years 
old; the first generation of pioneers 
in the medium is only now reaching 
retirement age. Thus, the correspond- 
ing audience has yet to reach senility. 
. . . The above is by way of jolting 
your attention to some recent chatter 
I have heard at the 1240 frequency: 
"You old timers will remember this 
one" — followed by a playing of Glenn 
Miller's In The Mood. Or: "Oldsters 
in the audience will remember when 
Frank Sinatra recorded this one with 
the old Tommy Dorsey Orchestra." 

The bulk of the buying audience — 
those "oldsters" who grew up to the 
music of the late '30's and early '40's 
— are now between the ages of 35 and 
45 (the women are all 29). If you 
really believe that, along with Peter 
Pan (Marty Martin is over forty), 
life as it is now lived began with your 
particular age group and will always 
stay there — you had best seek employ- 
ment with Tinker Toy, Lionel trains, 
or in Santa Claus' workshop! 

Bravo, Hoivard Coleman! 

Outspoken: Heading on a release 
from WNEW-TV, New York— 

MARYA MANNES TO DISCUSS 
'WHY WOMEN BORE MEN' ON 
"I SPEAK FOR MYSELF" 

Never admit it, Marya. 



n 



74 



SPONSOR 



18 july 1959 



H 



1TA) 



> 








Take TAE and See 



hefty, hearty sales-build< 



»r in the ^r-owing Pittsburgh SffiSSU" 



.Ma 



BASIC ABC IN PITTSBURGH 



8/G mmSIOH JM IH PITTSBURGH 



PinSIU»W lltENTIHOUl 1W H 

GROWING WITH 



PITTSBURGH'S 



REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY RENAISSANCE 



V 









TTus is the kind of hold our station has on people 



The helping hand is a reality here. 
A true cross-section of home-owning 
America, the roots of family life go deep 
— in the many thriving cities and on the 
flourishing farms. Here families like to 
cater to their wants through friends and 
neighbors. 

We are friends and neighbors. The vet- 
eran members of our staff are solid figures 
in the community, active in church and 
community projects — the P.T.A., the 



Community Chest, Scouting. Our pro- 
gramming is friendly, too. Lots of public 
service. Help on community problems. No 
triple spots. 

So our audience loyalty is intense, by 
every measure. As you consider our 
quantity story (747,640 TV homes in 41 
counties of 3 states) never forget the qual- 
itative one . . . George P. Hollingbery will 
show you a realistic, one-price rate-card. 



whio-tv 

CBS 



channel 



□ 



daytl 
ohio \ 



ONE OF AMERICA'S GREAT AREA STATIONS 

Reaching and Holding 2,881,420 People 



28 JULY 1888 

*Q« ■ copy* $8 a y*«r 

PART ONE OF TWO PART8 



THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 




BBDO MEDIA 
SHIFTS 
INTO HIGH 

I ..« J est inter-age,' 
shakeup spotlights 
growing sophistication 
of media planning 

Page 31 






The Ziv man in your market has full details on 
how you can profit by using one of America's 
GREAT selling forces ... a Ziv Show! 





Where will 
Joe Culligan 
go from here? 

Page 34 

look here, you 
agency guys' 

A station man's rebuttal 

Page 38 




300 ways to up 
tv billing— 
TvB's co-op ad list 

Page 43 



EST ON PAGE 




RADIO 

50,000 WATTS 



KSTP 



TELEVISION 

CHANNEL 5 



MINNEAPOLIS • ST. PAUL Bask NBC Affiliate 

KOB AM-TV W-GTO AM 

Albuquerque, New Mexico Cypress Gardens, Florida 

Edward Petry & Company, Inc., National Representatives 



NBC TELEVISION HLM.S-A DIVISION ur 



ie's Joe Friday. On CNP's BADGE 714. He works /^1 \T T) 
mly for you, in your market, starting this Fall. V^y 1. N 



CALIFORNIA NATIONAL PRODUCTIONS, INC 




7 MAN 

BEHIND 

BADGE 









A BIG NEW 

MARKET IN THE 

GROWING SOUTH! 




. 4 *£fq35^ 




MERIDIAN 

MISSISSIPPI 

This fast-growing, changing market 
has now mushroomed into one of 
the South's new metropolitan areas. 
A highly diversified economy makes 
the Meridian, Mississippi area a 
stable, steady market. 

Covering 29 key counties in Mis- 
sissippi and Alabama, plus a sur- 
prisingly low cost, makes WTOK-TV 
one of the nations most efficient 
media buys. 

• $427,311,000 RETAIL SALES 

• $601,297,000 EFFECTIVE BUYINC INCOME 

• OVER 100,000 TV HOMES 

• $200,000,000 CONSTRUCTION PROCRAM 




Maximum power 316,000 watts 




© Vol. 13, No. 30 • 25 JULY 1959 

Pg"% ftj C£ £"% D 
^»JP l^Si -<w»jp %*F WyL 

THE WEEKLY MAGAZINE TV/RADIO ADVERTISERS USE 



DIGEST OF ARTICLES 

BBDO restyles for changing media world 

31 Behind changes taking place in BBDO's media department is a lot of 
sound thinking on media's future. Here is how new setup will function 

Whither Joe Culligan? 

34 Philosopher-salesman-promoter-psychologist — that's NBC's Joe Culligan. 
His varied interests and diverse talents have resurrected network radio 

$100,000 wedge in shelf space 

36 Cheramy switched entire budget to tv to cash in on supermarket toi- 
letries boom — now a |5 billion, high-profit plus for grocery trade 

Look here, you agency guys 

38 Operations manager of West Coast tv station says goofy agency instruc- 
tions on films, commercials cause schedule snafus; cites seven examples 

Selling Yellow Pages — Chicago style 

40 Publisher Donnelley saturates market to sell Yellow Pages. His radio 
jingles are merchandized at customer level by Illinois Bell salesmen 

300 ways to up tv billing 

43 TvB's co-op ad department compiled it ; now for the first time an industry 
magazine reprints list of national manufacturers with tv co-op plans 

Hometown corn wins space battle 

44 A Pennsylvania corn packer needed space in a hurry; packed brand 
image, copy appeals with local flavor, bagged best sales year to date 

Marines capture Florida radio station 

45 WPDQ, Jacksonville, Fla., builds station image with listeners on ad- 
vertisers' behalf with such stunts as Fourth of July mock attack on island 



FEATURES 

70 Film-Scope 

26 49th and Madison 

58 News & Idea Wrap-Up 

4 Newsmaker of the Week 
58 Picture Wrap-Up 
48 Radio Results 
46 Sponsor Asks 
20 Sponsor Backstage 



72 Sponsor Hears 

1 3 Sponsor-Scope 

80 Sponsor-Speaks 

52 Spot Buys 

80 Ten-Second Spots 

24 Timebuyers at Work 

78 Tv and Radio Newsmakers 

69 Washington Week 



Member of Business Publications l!|L/'l 

Audit of Circulations Inc. bsBs 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC. combined with TV. Executive, Editorial, Circulation and 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49 & Madison) New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray 
Hill 8-2772. Chicago Office: 612 N. Michigan Ave. Phone: Superior 7-9863. Birmingham 
Office: Town House, Birmingham. Phone: FAirfax 4-6529. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Boulevard. Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Printing Office: 3110 Elm Ave., Baltimore 11, 
Md. Subscriptions: U. S. $8 a year. Canada & other Western Hemisphere Countries $9 a 
year. Other Foreign countries $11 per year. Single copies 40c. Printed in U.S.A.. Address 
all correspondence to 40 E. 49th St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. MUrray Hill 8-2772. Published weekly 
by SPONSOR Publications Inc. 2nd class postage paid at Baltimore, Md. 



©1959 Sponsor Publications Inc. 



Sponsor • 25 july:; 1959 

- 







NOW 

New York's most intriguing 
television station turns to 



YOUNGPRESENTATION ! 

Effective July 15 ] 

Young Television Corporation 
becomes exclusive 
national representative for 

NTA-TV 

Channel 13...NTA's uniquely programmed, 
uniquely successful independent in 

Ell Vw X v^XiiJl3L 

This is the station which has 

magnetized millions of viewers with new 

dimensions in programming, with 

on-screen personalities so impressive they've 

earned national syndication. 

WNTA-TV is due to play a key role in 

your New York area marketing— and 

our knowledgeable people in seven 

important centers have the key. 

YOUNG TELEVISION CORPORATION 

An Adam Young Company 













NEW YORK 

3 East 54th St. 

New York 22. N. Y. 

Plaza 1-4848 








LOS ANGELES 

6331 Hollywood Blvd. 

Los Angeles 28. Calif. 

HOIIywood 2-2289 








CHICAGO 

Prudential Plaza 

Chicago 1. III. 
Michigan 2-6190 








ATLANTA 

1182 W. Peachtree 

Atlanta. Ga 

TRimty 3-2564 








SAN FRANCISCO 

Russ Bldg. (Rm. 1207) 

San Francisco 4. Calif. 

YUkon 6-6769 


ST. LOUIS 

317 No. Eleventh St 
St. Louis, Mo. 
MAm 1-5020 


DETROIT 

2940 Book Bldg. 
Detroit 26. Mich. 
WOodward 3-6919 


SPONSOR • 


25 JULY 


1959 













Jsn Jsndi 



tana . . 




q. WPTA 

FORT WAYNE 

Get The Promotion 
Extras 



• Dealer Mailings 

• Poinr-of-Purchase 

• Id Blitz 

• Billboards 

• Taxi Ads 

• Bus Ads 

all this PLUS Top Ratings — 
and LOW RATES — 

_y\rj« the man from . . . 

YOUNG TV CORP 



WPTA CUnef 21 



NEWSMAKER 
of the week 



ABC TV last week introduced another major personnel inno- 
vation in naming research specialist Julius Barnathan to head 
station relations and clearances as well — a crucial declaration 
as ABC goes into high gear to compete with well-established 
CBS and NBC in lining up affiliates, capturing time slots. 

The newsmaker: Thirty-three-year-old Julius Barnathan. 
after five years of intensive research dredging and experimentation at 
ABC TV, has been appointed vice president for affiliated stations 
heading up three divisions: research, with 25 persons; station rela- 
tions, with 10; station clearances, with 40. His respective key assist- 
ants will continue in their jobs: Fred Pierce, manager of research; 
Alfred R. Beckman, v.p. in charge of station relations, and Donald S. 
Shaw Jr., director of station clearance. ABC TV's continuing recog- 
nition of the role of research and statistical documentation in its 
sales and program efforts appears 
to deemphasize the more glamor- 
ous, sometimes flossy approach of 
CBS and NBC in their pitches to 
prospects and stations. Notes Mr. 
Barnathan: "We had to find new 
research, as near to the total truth 
as possible, which would show our 
advantages as the 'third network.' ' 

Other nets, he says, were a 
"shoo-in for transom business," 
and ABC had to combat this with 
nuts and bolts arguments. He says 
other nets are now following this 
ABC research lead. 

The same principle of hard facts holds true for affiliates in station 
relations and clearance matters, he says. "Hand-shaking was first 
eliminated in the sales area, when salesmen asked for more technical 
information." This stress on facts has now extended to all three 
areas under his jurisdiction. His job: to concentrate on clearances 
and affiliates in order "to solve some of the acute problems facing us." 

Mr. Barnathan was graduated with a Bachelor's degree from 
Brooklyn College in 1950, and earned a Master's in Mathematical 
Statistics from Columbia U. in 1953. After working at Kenyon & 
Eckhardt agency as director of media research and statistical analysis, 
he joined ABC in 1954 as supervisor of ratings. Two years later he 
became manager of tv research and in 1957, director. In March of 
this year he was named v.p. in charge of research. 

He and his wife, six-year-old Joyce and three-year-old Daniel, live 
in New York City but plan to move to suburban Long Island in 
September when their split-level house is completed. He is vice 
president of the Radio-Tv Research Council and a member of Radio- 
Tv Executives Society and American Statistical Assn. 

sponsor • 25 JULY 1959 




Julius Barnathan 



NEWSMAKER STATION of the WEEK 



■ 



▲ 




THE DOMINANT ADVERTISING MEDIUM 

Amazing but true — Radio Station WARM is the leading 
Advertising Medium in the Scranton - Wilkes-Barre market 



of over 650,000 people. No other medium does as good a job. 

PROOF: 

1. WARM is the only full time 50,000 watt station 
in the area. 

2. WARM is number one in all surveys. 

3. Newspapers scattered — top circulation 
only 65,000. 

4. TV Stations all UHF with limited penetration. 

5. WARM sales results for advertisers also amazing. 

By every yardstick — sales results, ratings, coverage, pene- 
tration, circulation — WARM is, without doubt, the leading 
advertising medium in north eastern Pennsylvania! 






robert e. eastman & co., 



inc. 



national representatives of radio stations 



NEW YORK: 

527 Madison Avenue 
New York 22, N. Y. 
PLaza 9-7760 



CHICAGO: 

333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago, Illinois 
Financial 6-7640 



SAN FRANCISCO: 

RussBldg. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

YUkon 2-9760 



DALLAS: 

211 North Ervay Bldg. 
Dallas, Texas 
Riverside 7-2417 



ST. LOUIS: 

Syndicate Trust Bldg. 
915 Olive St. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
CEntral 1-6055 



LOS ANGELES: 

Taft Building 
1680 N. Vine St. 
Hollywood, Cal. 
HOIIywood 4-7276 



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6 P.M. to Midnight 

Sign-on to Sign-off . . . 

and 18 of the 

Top 20 Shows 

ARB, April-May, 1959 



This mop, prepared by Gulf Oil 
Corporation and used with 
their permission, does not represent 
on endorsement of any product 
or ser.- :e whatsoever. 



Hot sp°T 



KFDM-TV 

Beaumont-Port Arthur-Orange 

C. B. Locke, Executive Vice President 
& General Manager 

Mott Johnson, Sales & Operations Manager 

*'A 

*.*'■*? ^*> Peters-Griffin-Woodward, Inc. 



4*» 



a 




1 Dallas-Fort Worth 

2 Houston 

3 San Antonio 

4 BEAUMONT- 
PORT ARTHUR- 
ORANGE 

5 El Paso 

6 Corpus Christi 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 






Picture Q 

*What's your WOODquotient ? 





WOOD-AM has the greatest share of au- 
dience during the morning rush hour. How 
much greater than the 2nd station? 

*(;uoi;djs pig 3ui ui>m now %ni)l 

:uoi}Djs pur, am uv>{i alow %os aoo.w 

<>l pjuni »iri 8X91{)0 //" pun soipnj J/'.) 1 



Sun-burned vacationers listen to WOOD, 
too. How many lakes — with or without 
beaches — in greater WOODIand? 
iuvBiyaiffl a.yi)'/ Buojn jjoijx Apuvs "\[ot fo 
83J11U il!) inoqv UOIJU3W <>i j»» ■.■.',>.y»/ SS£) 




Who is the only radio weather forecaster 
in WOODIand who has had actual meteor- 
ological training and experience? 

I jJU/DJ.n 

»ijl uo pjBu fl|/»n»« pun 'AX'HV-aOOM 
uo flfSu Upaisnpx) '.ij.y'>Mi/Si>/,s' yttoij* 



In addition to the best coverage of local 
news. WOODIanders get direct non-network 
reports from Washington, D.C. How come? 

-Hid fo xajujjjttjjo ityfidvo uo 8}JtoddJi /ua 
■puodstuoo uo)8uii{SVjtf j«"i//«/>', QOOM 



How to rate your WOODquotient: 

right — No doubt you have a persecution complex, too 
1-2 right — Courage! You'll make it someday 

3 right — The Katz man will give you_a^the answers 

4 right — How long were you a resident of Grand Rapids? 

'WOOD-AM is first — morning, noon, night, Monday through Sunday 
March '59 Pulse Grand Rapids — 5 county area 




WOOD 



AM 
TV 



WOODIand Center, Grand Rapids, Michigan 

WOOD-TV — NBC for Western and Central Michigan: 

Grand Rapids, Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Muskegon and Lansing. 

WOOD — Radio — NBC 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 




SPONSOR 



ACAZINL TV II" 



IO ADVCHTISIHS USE 



Editor and Publisher 

Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Elaine Couper Glenn 

VP— Assistant Publisher 

Bernard Piatt 

EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT 
Executive Editor 

John E. McMillin 

News Editor 

Ben Bodec 

Managing Editor 

Florence B. Hamsher 

Special Projects Editor 

Alfred J. Jaffe 

Senior Editors 

Jane Pinkerton 
W. F. Milcsch 

Midwest Editor (Chicago) 

Swen Smart 

Film Editor 

Heyward Ehrlich 

Associate Editors 

Pete Rankin 
lack Lindrup 

Gloria F. F 

Contributing Editor 

loe Csida 

Art Editor 

Maury Kurtz 

Production Editor 

Lee St. John 

Readers' Service 

Lloyd Kaplan 

Editorial Research 

Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 

ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 

VP-Eastern Manager 

Bernard Piatt 

Jack Ansell, Sales Development Mgr. 

Robert Brokaw, Eastern Sales 

Sandra Lee Oncay, Sales Administration 

VP-Western Manager 

Edwin D. Cooper 

Southern Manager 

Herb Martin 

Midwest Manager 

Roy Meachum 

Production Manager 

Jane E. Perry 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Allen M. Greenberg 

ADMINISTRATIVE DEPT. 

lama Oken. Office Mgr. 
George Becker- Charles Eckert- 
Gilda Gomez: Priscilla He - - 




An entirely 
NEW KIND OF 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 
AGENCY . . . 
pledged to destroy 
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|m 1 


It, w 








Fl 


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in 



But don't tell me how to 
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,ii, 




i 




Z1V 



tarring 




as Col. Frank Dawson 
hief of Law Enforcement 




Carolina viewers already know it. Local sponsors feel it. 

National advertisers everywhere are learning fast. 

The tops of NBC and ABC-plus the best of Warner Brothers 

are changing audience patterns of Charlotte television. 

Get the facts. Here in America's 22nd largest tv-homes market 

you'll do better with Charlotte's dynamic WSOC-TV... 

one of the great area stations of the nation. 




CHARLOTTE-9 NBC and ABC. Represented by H-R 



WSOC and WSOC-TV are associated with WSB and WSB-TV, Atlanta and WHIO and WHIO-TV, Dayton 

12 sponsor • 25 july 1959, 




Most significant tv and radio 

news of the week with interpretation 

in depth for busy readers 



SPONSOR-SCOPE 



25 JULY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC. 



Look for sellers of spot tv — with the aid of the TvB — to take the offensive 

against the mounting trend among copywriters to treat the 20-second commercial and the 
ID as inferior sales tools. 

TvB's contribution to the hattle to demolish this psychological stigma is the pulling 
together of a mass of material showing how successful 20's and I.D.'s have been in 
selling goods in recent years. 

Spot sellers recognize that the creators of the problem are the copywriters (the me- 
dia gentry generally is in the position of being forced to go along) . Hence the educational job 
will be done primarily with the copy people. 

Background note: A credo that appears to have swept the ranks of commercial writers 
the past season is that an effective sales story can't be told in less than a minute. 

P.S. : Some media directors are of the opinion that this attitude is merely temporary, and 
that when the minute market runs dry the copy folks will find themselves capable 
of doing as effective a task with 20 seconds. 



A spot check among reps by SPONSOR-SCOPE this week shows that national spot 
radio sales for the first six months of 1959 ran about 10% better than for the like 
period of 1958. 

True, much of the business is shortterm. But it's intense, with much longer market 
lists than have prevailed for the medium for some time. 



A check by SPONSOR-SCOPE of fall tv network program costs indicates that the 
increase for nighttime fare will average out to about 10%. 

Including the tab for reruns, the average gross cost — on a half-hour basis — by type of 
program will look like this: 

$59,000 Suspense-crime 40,000 

54,000 Interview-documentary 32,000 

43,500 Audience part. 26,000 

$41,500 

Note: Many of the film series are subject to increases granted to the Screen Actors 
Guild as a result of the contract terms now in negotiation or to the IATSE. 



Comedy-variety 
Musical 

Situation comedy 
Westerns 



Talk to reps and Madison Avenue media directors on the competitive dimen- 
sions of network minute-announcement-carriers for spot tv and you'll get opposite 
reactions. 

Practically all reps in the medium are worried about the burgeoning of these spot 
carriers and deplore the slowness with which stations are showing alarm. 

Media directors queried by SPONSOR-SCOPE appeared to hold the view that, despite 
the administrative advantages, spot carriers as they're now set up aren't an authentic 
substitute for local spot campaigns. In fact, they say, they are more expensive. 

Network, these media people point out. never can take the place of the basic objectives 
and values of spot. Only through spot can the advertiser select those markets where 
the potential for his product is especially promising, obtain the type of frequency he 
requires, and exert maximum flexibility at a particular time. 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



13 



j ^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 

The budding practice among stations of selling local jobbers chunks of time 
and letting them broker it out to manufacturers is beginning to boomerang. 

The realization is dawning among stations that they're 1) antagonizing agencies, and 
2) permitting the bu\ ing-controlling jobbers to set station policies. 

A spectacular example now prevails in the Los Angeles market. Agencies with toy ac- 
counts can get on a certain station only if their schedules have August starting dates. But a 
toy broker controlling a block of time on that station is able to extend fall starting 
dates to the very same agencies' clients. 

A situation common to many markets: local brokers and jobbers make participation in 
their programs a condition of doing business with a manufacturer. 

Another drawback for stations: They could make more money by selling this time 
directly to manufacturers at national rates. 

NC&K's Norman B. Norman looks for the agency to bill over $8 million in tv 
for the coming season — and that's exclusive of the Hertz business which recently came 
into the shop. 

The calculation by accounts: Willys Motors in Maverick, $2 million; Speidel, $2 mil- 
lion; Colgate network participations, $2 million; Maidenform tv spots, $1.5 million; and 
Chanel tv spots, $750,000. 

Esty, which has been checking logs in connection with R. J. Reynolds schedules, 
this week had a kind word for the cooperation it's been getting from radio stations. 

The latest survey, the agency noted, showed that an overwhelming number of sta- 
tions on the Reynolds list has adhered to the injunction to maintain at least a 15- 
minute interval between Reynolds commercials and those of other cigarette companies. 

J. B. Williams' Conti Shampoo, now in the Pharmaceuticals, Inc. family, could be- 
come a source of spot radio revenue this fall if a saturation test starting in New York 
this week gets favorable retailer reaction. 

Aqua Velva already has been tagged by the company — Parkson is the agency — as a 
radio buyer on a broad scale this fall, though most of the 1959-60 spot money 
(about $1.5 million) will go for tv. 

Pharmaceuticals' network tv expenditures for the coining season have been earmarked 
for around $18 million — $2 million more than last time. 

Some marketing experts think that the time isn't far off when the limited-pur- 
pose detergents will find their heyday ending. 

The dollar volume of the limited-purpose detergents already is beginning to show the 
competitive pressure of the universal detergents (Lestoil and Mr. Clean). The main 
objective of the limited-purpose rivals from here on out will be to keep their shares up. 

Now that the Lestoil types have practically all adopted distinctive scents the next step 
will be in the direction of color distinctions. 

Audience composition figures on radio and tv tell only part of the story: Tlicy 
don't tell what percent of all men, women, teenagers, and children in the U. S. pop- 
ulation are listening or viewing. 

SSCB's media coordinator Dick Dunne in SPONSOR'S Media Basics (the second sec- 
tion of this issue) supplies the missing link with a detailed breakdown of actual hours of 
viewing by these various groups based on U. S. population and Nielsen audience compo- 
sition. 

For instance, Dunne's study shows although the viewing audience between 7:30 and 10 
p.m. (N. Y. time) is composed of but 12% teenagers, they represent around 50% of 
all the teenagers in the nation. 

14 sponsor • 25 july 1959 






SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



NBC already has made a couple pitches — to hard goods accounts — on its $6- 
niillion radio/tv package of the Presidential nominations and election. 

The price is SI million more than in 1956. Because of llie size of the nut, the network 
expects to dispose of it in thirds. 

P.S. : Look for an important breakthrough by Ampex in connection with tin- 
taping of the convention proceedings. It will involve all types of programing. 

Aleoa is interested in concentrating its tv network efforts into a single show. So 
F&S&R already has begun to scout around for candidates — even though the selectee 
wouldn't go on the air until the fall of 1960. 

Meanwhile Alcoa Presents on ABC TV has been renewed until June I960, and the 
show which the company alternates with Goodyear on NBC TV is set to go through 
next summer. The two series involve about $6 million in time and talent. 

With fall tv buying completed, Colgate agencies currently are going through the 
process of evaluating the medium to the client. 

The review — or projection — includes: general thinking about tv; what the program 
trends are; the spread and purposes of specials; and new techniques for buying and 
using the medium that seems to be on the horizon. 

It's assumed that one of the networks will get an annual bid to say its piece and 

answer questions at a Colgate top-level luncheon. 

Benrus is expected to take off on its own in an air media push paralleling the 
one announced in part last week by the Watchmakers of Switzerland (C&W). 

The Swiss Watchmakers' plan: A special in the fall (NBC TV) and another in the 
spring, plus three weeks of announcements (costing around $150,000) on NBC Radio. 

Objective: Give leadership, impetus, and Support to American timepieces with Swiss 
movements, with stress on the qualitv factor. The idea is to counteract the mounting ad- 
vertising pressure from makers of American movements. 

There are still seven tv network advertisers who don't have to resort to specials 
to anpease their hunger for sponsor identification. 

Tn each of the seven cases the sponsor's name continues to be billed either above or 
in close conjunction with the title of the program. 

The group: Alcoa, Chevrolet, Armstrong, Gillette, Kraft. Goodyear, and U. S. 
Steel. 

Apparently the use of the company name in the program title doesn't get the whole- 
sale deletions it used to in newspaper listings. Alcoa, for instance, reports that the 
titles, the Alcoa Theatre and Alcoa Presents, get into about 90% of the listings outside 
New York and a few other metropolitan cities. 

The pickup in daytime business has been responsible for hailing out the tv 
networks from what might have been a Mexican standoff in sponsored hours thi< summer. 

Take the sponsored hour count for the first week of .Tub. Nighttime hours for the three 
networks collectively just about matched the figure of a year ago. But because of 
the hike in daytime sponsored hours, the trio emerged with a 20.8% increase. 

The total sponsored hours by network compare thus: 

NETWORK JULY 1959 JULY 1958 % INCREASE 

ABC TV 2:: Ins.. 15 mins. 1 ( > hrs., 30 mins. II.')',' 

CBS TV 54 hrs., 35 mins. 18 hrs., 55 mins. 11.6 

NBC TV 17 hrs., 58 mins. 30 hrs.. 53 mins. 20.3 

TOTAL 130 hrs., 48 mins. 108 his., 18 mins. 20.8% 

25 july 1959 15 



^ SPONSOR-SCOPE continued 



Campbell Soup (BBDO) may soon be taking a fling at radio. The actual direction 
— spot or network — will be decided this or next week. 

Meantime this business has been landed by the radio networks for the fall: 

CBS: Oldsmobile (Brother) takes over Lowell Thomas 28 September; Mentholatum, 

(JWT) a 26-week announcement schedule, starting 4 October; miscellaneous buys by Milton 

Bradley toys (Noyes), Q-Tips (Gumbinner) ; Grove Four-Way, and Fitch (Cohen, Dowd 

& Aleshire) . 

NBC: Quaker Oats (Wherry, Baker & Tilden) ; Mrs. Grass' Noodles (Myerhoff); 

California Packing (McCann-Erickson) ; renewal Grand 01' Opry by R. J. Reynolds 

(Esty). 

Agency mergers and consolidations have had their dark effects on the employment 
situation with one conspicuous exception : timebuyers. 

With tv the high-riding medium, the unanchored timebuyer hasn't found it too 
tough to find a mooring elsewhere. 

Credit radio with getting people outdoors this summer: The two most popular 
audience promotions among stations are treasure hunts (digging in beach sand is an 
important part of the gimmick) and running down a "secret address." 

Another stunt that seems to be taking hold is reporting the correct weather in various 
areas within a station's coverage. 

Add Ogilvy, Benson & Mather to the host of agencies with people on the road 
to contact tv stations on fall spot buys. But in this instance the agency is sharing the 
job with another agency on the Vick account — Morse International. 

Vick will be steeped in network tv as well as spot. It's bought alternate minutes over 
26 weeks on CBS TV's Lineup and Rawhide, plus some CBS daytime. 

Going into the fall, CBS TV will be the only network where the total time con- 
sumed by regularly-scheduled nighttime hour shows will be less than the total time 
devoted to half -hour programs. 

Here's a comparison of such time segments — plus the number of nighttimers that 
figure wholly or partially as minute announcement carriers: 



NETWORK 


NO. HOUR SHOWS 


NO. HALF-HOUR SHOWS 


MINUTE CARRIERS 


ABC TV 


13 


32 


11 


CBS TV 


8 


32 


3 


NBC TV 


12 


• 24 


5 



To get a better gauge of sponsor identification within the tv home, Trendex will 
introduce a couple of refinements this fall in its probing technique. 
The changes, which should, in effect, result in overall higher SI ratings: 

1) If the person who answers the phone says he, or she, can't identify the sponsor, the 
interviewer will ask that the query be put to other members of the family. 

2) Sponsor identification scores will count only those homes that could have seen 
the commercial. 

Incidentally, the Trendex check on commercial memorability has shown a phe- 
nomenal playback for Polaroid. E\ identity, there's a big advantage when the enter- 
tainers themselves participate in llir demonstration. 

For other news coverage in this issue, see Newsmaker of the Week, page 4; 
Spot Buys, page 52; News and Idea Wrap-Up, page 58; Washington Week, page 69; SPONSOR 
Hears, page 72; Tv and Radio Newsmakers, page 78; and Film-Scope, page 70. 

16 sponsor • 25 july 1959 



ATTENTION MEDIA BUYERS: THERE'S A NEW SALES CLIMATE! 



A breath of 




ifor Southern California radio 



On Independence Day, KBIG instituted a crisp format of hour and half-hour musical 
programs, each featuring one top orchestra balanced by a leading vocalist. Music ranges from 
the scores of hit shows to Dixieland . . . from jazz to symphonic pop. 

The concept is from radio's happy yesterday. But the richness of popular music embraces 
yesterday, today and tomorrow ... Percy Faith, Ray Anthony, Mantovani, Ted Heath; Frank 
Sinatra, Patti Page, Perry Como, Peggy Lee, and a full range of other headliners. In addition, 
KBIG maintains its established features in the field of news, sports and weather. 

Listeners are learning of the new programming through KBIG itself, and newspaper 
and outdoor advertising. A "fresh air" slogan contest for listeners offers a trip for two to Paris, 
plus twenty merchandise prizes. 

KBIG's great coverage of all eight Southern California counties now receives added im- 
pact with this new programming philosophy. 

You need the right sales climate for your advertising... and KBIG has it! 




Radio Catalina . . . 740kc/ 10,000 watts 

JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 6540 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles 28, Calif. • HOIIywood 3-3205 

NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: WEED RADIO CORPORATION 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1959 



17 



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WRITE. . . WIRE. . . PHONE 



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J. E. O'Neill — President 

Joe Drilling — Vice President 

and General Manager 
W.O. Edholm — Commercial Manager 
See your H-R representative n'n400\ 




by Joe Csida 



Sponsor 




The FCC: Father, doctor or foe? 

Our Government agencies and their key per- 
sonnel lead the most interesting lives. They meet 
the most fascinating people. And these people 
open up to the Government lads as they might 
otherwise only to their fathers, their psychiatrists 
and /or their parish priests. 

What prompts this rather obvious observation, 
as you might have guessed, are the doings in 

downtown New York several weeks ago. which found the top tele- 
vision men in the top U.S. advertising agencies baring their books 
and their souls to a Federal Communications Commission examiner 
and his cohorts. 

During the first week of these hearings I Monday, 6 July, through 
Friday. 10 July I for example, eight agency executives, whose firms 
in total bill approximately $1,350,000,000 (yes, that's one billion, 
three hundred fifty million dollars I annually — these eight fellows 
devoted major portions of their week to the enlightenment of the 
FCC gentlemen. The agency execs, their firms and the total billings 
figures each gave (just for the record I run like this: 



C. Terence Clyne 
McCann-Erickson 
$260,000,000 

Robert L. Foreman 

BBDO 

$200,000,000 

Richard Pinkham 
Ted Bates 
$100,000,000 

Dan Seymour 

J. Walter Thompson 

$300,000,000 



Peter Levathes 
Young & Rubicam 
$230,000,000 

Philip Cohen 

SSC&B 

$45,000,000 

Lewis Titterton 

Compton 

$100,000,000 

Thomas McDermott 
Benton & Bowles 
$107,000,000 



That's a lot of nine-figure numbers and, in each case, more of 
these dollars are spent in television than in any other single adver- 
tising medium: indeed, in many cases more than in other media 
combined. 

These agency executives, as I've said, donated a big part of their 
week to the education of the following FCC personnel: James D. 
Cunningham (chief examiner I . James Tierney and Ashbrook Bryant 
(counsel), Harold Cogwill I Broadcast Bureau chief) and James 
Sheridan I acting chief). 

No place for timid or feeble 

Thev told the Commission men exactly how major advertising 
campaigns are dreamed up. and the procedures followed in each 
agency in attempting to get the best possible television shows in the 
best possible time slots on the networks. While I — even as you and 



20 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



i 





FIRST CLASS 

PERMIT NO. 47613 
New York, N. Y. 


BUSI N ESS REPLY MAI L 

No Postage Stamp Necessary i-f Mailed in the United States 


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SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY OF1 



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Or check here to take advantage of sponsor's money- 
saving, long term rate — 104 issues for only $12. 



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2.i JULY 1959 



21 



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Sponsor backstage continued 



anyone else who's been around our business for a little while — air 
fairly familiar with the large stakes involved in the big leagues o: 
the advertising and television businesses, I was impressed anew b) 
how truly vast these stakes are on every level. 

Terry Clyne, for example, said that in the pre-buying season this 
year (say March through June) McCann-Erickson had looked al 
somewhere between 225 and 250 pilot films of proposed series. Al 
but perhaps 25 of these were new. Clyne estimated they cost th 
producers between $50,000 and $70,000 each. Taking the average ol 
235 pilots and a $60,000 per, production figure, gives you an invest 
ment of a little better than $14,000,000 in pilots. 

Tom McDermott said his best guess as to the annual investment 
for pilots made in advance each season was about $25,000,000. th 
figured that maybe one-tenth of these are placed. Clyne revealed thai 
the casualty rate on network shows in his experience runs abou 
70%. And when it's remembered that the men who are laying this 
$14,000,000 to $25,000,000 on the line, are bucking not only eacl 
other's shows, but all the live shows, sports events, et al for the 
limited network time available, you can readily understand wh) 
major league advertising-television is hardly a dodge for the feebh 
and the timid. 

Must have a million for net tv 

But that's only part of the story the agency men told the FCC ex 
aminers. Clyne indicated that if an account didn't have at least a 
million-dollar budget he hardly belonged in network television at all 
Bob Foreman said he felt an advertiser could do a job on what h< 
called a scatter basis for a paltry $300,000 by using specials, oi 
possibly playing with daytime. Foreman and Clyne were in genera 
agreement on the fact that it cost an advertiser about $2,500,000 tc 
sponsor an alternate week, half hour dramatic show on a network 
Foreman said about that figure, and Clyne estimated it at arounc 
$2,700,000. 

To a man, the agency leaders were frank and outspoken. And ir 
every area. McDermott said that if an agency wanted to finance 
pilots of new series for clients, it would have to risk better than 
$2,000,000' a year to do this. He indicated a certain amount of con 
tentment with the fact that these gambles are taken by independenl 
producers and the networks. Bob Foreman, carrying his character 
istically candid approach to the most personal level, even told the 
Commission examiners that he turned down The $64,000 Question 
when Louis Cowan ( then head of his own packaging firm ) broughl 
it to Foreman strictly as an idea on paper. Bob pointed up a 
truism soon learned by any creative man dealing with raw ideas an 
completed properties: i.e.. an idea isn't nearly as important as th 
execution of it. 

I'm a little confused about the ultimate purpose of the FCC i 
conducting these hearings into network television operations. I' 
glad they're running them, however, because I'm sure learning a lo 
from them. I'm learning that it takes the strongest, brightest kind I 
men to build network television in a free enterprise society. Aim 
more than ever I'm convinced that the built-in system of checks am 
balances in our society will not only account for the best commercia 
television in the world, but the best television of an educational and| 
socially-constructive nature in the broadest sense. 



22 



SPONSOR 



25 july 195^ 



Revision for Eastern Iowa • Channel 2 • Cedar Rapids— Waterloo • Affiliated with WMT Radio: KWMT Fort Dodge • National Representatives: The Katz Agency 



A/ most everyone in Eastern Iowa watches WMT-TV. 




Raleigh-Durham 
the Nation's 




Radio Market 

32-county 1959 
PULSE again 

shows WPTF 

FIRST all the 

way from sign on 

to sign off . . . 

witha36%share 

of audience that 

is almost three 

times that of our 

nearest competitor, 

a 12-station local 

network. 




21 



Timebuyers 
at work 







Philip Rouda, Bozelle & Jacobs, Inc., Chicago, v.p. and director 
of radio/tv, feels that many stations are undermining the entire 
rate structure with too flexible definitions of local and regional 
rates. '"Some fast-buck station salesmen bypass rep and agency and 
go directly to the client with local and regional rate inducements,"' 
Phil says. "Even though a busi- 
nessman is willing to pay a fair 
price, he won't pay more than the 
next fellow if he can help it. The 
minute the client discovers he can 
get a local or regional rate, the 
agency is placed in the position 
of trying to get that trade." Phil 
points out that sometimes these 
local or regional rates carry agency 
commissions, sometimes they do 
not. B&J recently encountered 
several instances where their clients 
were told by radio salesmen that they could save money by cutting 
out the agency and station representative. "Perhaps the single rate 
is unfeasible at this time," Phil says. "But until it is, Ave need 
rigid definitions of local, regional and national. A better sense 
of ethics by station manaaers would help others a great deal too.' 

Howard Webb, the Ralph Allum Co., New York, makes some sug- 
gestions to advertisers for taking better advantage of radio during 
slack periods. "I try to hit hard with frequency," Howard says. "If 
all the cumulative, scattered ratings in radio were lined up end to 
end, they still wouldn't mean a thing without repetition. I group 

my buys so I get good repetition, 
not neat tallies. I buy saturation 
in all hours when feasible for the 
product, and I've gotten some very 
effective run-of-schedule plans. Al- 
though not reported, I feel out-of- 
home listenership, other than traffic 
slots, makes up a large audience."] 
If a client's budget does not per- 
mit heavy, long-term schedules, 
Howard thinks it is better to have 
a number of high-frequency cam- 
paigns during the year than one or 



/ 




two long-term ones with low frequency. "On the other hand, most 
advertising today, other than seasonal and mail order products that 
require immediate audience reaction, depends upon a sustained 
product image. Short-terms that are too short, often do not make 
any impact and waste the client's money. You have to strike a 
practical balance between the short-term and long-term campaigns 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



450 
Baltimore! 
y Druggists 
stand | 
| behind 
& your | 
roduc 



»«)i 






W - I • T - H SPOTLIGHT I DRUG STORES 



RADIO BALTIMORE 

SpotLight Drug Display Plan! 

Get it now for your drug-store product — W«I»T«H's exclu- 
sive SpotLight Drug Display . . . your product featured in 
450 top-volume drug stores in the Baltimore Metropolitan 
Area by shelf talkers, window streamers, price tags and cash 
register strips ! PLUS . . . 450 druggists pushing your product ! 

Only W«I«T«H sells drug-store products so well because 
only W'LT'H SpotLights your product on the air and in 
the store! 



PHONE, WIRE OR WRITE TODAY FOR FULL DETAILS OF THIS 
SPECTACULAR MERCHANDISING PLAN! 



Tom Tinsley, President R. C. Embry, Vice President 

National Representatives: SELECT STATION REPRESENTATIVES in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore. Washington • CLARKE 
BROWN CO. in Dallas, Houston, Denver, Atlanta, New Orleans • DAREN F. McGAVREN CO. in Chicago, Detroit, Seattle, Los 
Angeles, San Francisco . OHIO STATIONS REPRESENTATIVES in Cleveland. 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



25 




OUP MUSiO iS THe MOST.' 



Listeners dig our music in much larger numbers than that 
of our "music and news" competitors. 

WBT's local music shows enjoy a 98% listener lead in the 
mornings, 50% afternoons and 126% at night.* 

Music represents only a portion of WBT's varied, creative, 
responsible programming. At home or on the road, Caro- 
linians have it made with WBT. 

Express yourselves, truth-seekers. A small bundle of loot 
placed on WBT covers the nation's 24th largest radio pad.** 
Call CBS Radio Spot Sales for the Word. 

Pulse 25 county area 1959 (March) 
"A. C. Nielsen Co. 

wbt CHaripTTe 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 
JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



26 



49th ai 



Not all freeloaders 
In your 27 June issue my attention 
was arrested by a page headed "Dear 
Miss Freeloader." I would like t 
debate Mr. Ludy's position ( whic 
was applauded by SPONSOR) againsl 
the efforts of publicists who send 
material to radio-tv stations. His blast 
was leveled at releases which try to 
attract the interest of women broad- 
casters and their audiences; there- 
fore, I will confine my rebuttals to 
that area. 

When I was on the other side of 
the microphone, I received quantities 
of mail from public relations firms, 
company publicists and advertising 
agencies. Much of the material of] 
fered was excellent and when it 
wasn't, it went into the circular file. 

Today, in the highly competi- 
tive battle for listeners and viewers, 
most stations have promotion man- 
agers. These promotion managers da 
not restrict their offers to on-the-air 
promo spots. They also dream up 
ways of getting the station's call 
letters and personalities in the local 
newspapers. 

I am not defending all that comes 
from the publicity grist mill. I think 
it is up to the publicist to make the 
release reasonable and usable on the 
air. When a release about a product 
is news, such as a new product, a new 
ingredient, a new use, isn't it of serv- 
ice to the listener to broadcast it? If 
a local angle can be applied, isn't it 
worthy of consideration? 

Some very informative and educ 
tional material can be pegged arou 
topical events. I have been doi 
scripts for broadcasters based on Pan 
American Week which falls in April. 
I include a mention or two of my 
clients company in the releases, but 
the company identification is not 
dragged in by the hair of the head 
for the sake of a commercial plug. 

Mr. Ludy. known as an able, con- 
I Please turn to page 28 ) 






SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 




Progress - - growth - - expansion - - these are the words we 
live by these days in Buffalo and Western New York. 

.'King of the Seaway ... Queen City of the Great Lakes... 
and many other titles and phrases can be aptly applied to 
this area and its thriving, pulsating activity. 

To reach out to the people who are doing the job and bene- 
fiting by the results there is one strong, clear and convincing 

voice- -certainly the most powerful medium in sight and sound. It is WBEN-TV 
--the pioneer station in Western New York -- the one station that consistently 
delivers your sales message to most of the people, most of the time. 
Reach for your phone --call Harrington, Righter &.Parsons, our national represen- 
tatives. They'll show you how your dollars count for more on Ch. 4. 



THE BUFFALO EVENING NEWS STATION 



Hi-level bridge construction over Buffalo River 



WBEN-TV 

CBS IN BUFFALO 



CH 




IPONSOR • 25 JULY 1959 



27 




RUNAWAY SALES 

SUCCESS 

ALL ACROSS U.S.A.! 



N 
E 
W 

S 



ORTH 

Detroit, St. Louis, 
Cleveland, Ft. Wayne! 

AST 

Boston, New Haven, 
Albany, Portland! 



EST 

Los Angeles, Denver, 
Seattle, Salt Lake City! 



OUTH 

Atlanta, New Orleans, 
Miami, Richmond! 



Have your local ITC represen- 
tative give you the news of how 
BRAVE STALLION can in- 
crease audiences in your market. 



INDEPENDENT 
TELEVISION 
CORPORATION 



488 Madison Ave. -NX 22 • PLaza 5-2100 

28 



49TH & MADISON 

[Continued from page 26) 

scientious station owner and manager 
I and if memory serves me correctly, 
a top-flight promotion manager, be- 
fore that I , has every right to reply 
to publicists exactly as he has done. 
When I receive his kind of letter — 
and I've had a few — I merely remove 
the station from my list. There is no 
sense in offending the station and 
wasting my client's postage. 

To take an arbitrary stand on pub- 
licity releases is to cut off some ex- 
cellent program sources. I say it is 
wiser for broadcasters to take every- 
thing they can get and discard what 
they don't like. What can be used will 
be very worth while. 

Fran Riley 
MacColl-Riley Assoc, 
public relations 
New York 



Station mixup 

In the June 13th issue of SPONSOR, 
Telepulse Ratings listed Whirlybirds 
as among the Top Ten syndicated 
shows in the Washington, D. C. area, 
on WTOP-TV. 

This is an erroneous listing. WTTG 
carries the first runs of the Whirly- 
bird series, whereas WTOP carries 
the re-runs under the program title 
'Copter Patrol. 

If Whirlybirds is one of the shows 
listed among the Top Ten, then the 
WTTG program and time period 
must be listed, and not the WTOP re- 
runs of the series I 'Copter Patrol ) . 

John E. McArdle 
v.p. & gen. mgr., 
WTTG 
Washington, D. C. 



Pardon us, please 

Just to set the records straight. 
Bachelor Father, now being carried on 
NBC Television Network, Thursday, 
9:00-9:30 p.m.. is sponsored by Dual 
Filter Tareyton and Whitehall. The 
agency of record is L. C. Gumbinner. 
Your listing in the June 20. 1959 
chart for spot buyers incorrectly list- 
ed Lucky Strike. 

Janet A. Murphy 
Lawrence C. Gumbinner 
Adv. Agcy. 
New York 




Sunn) 

follows 

a elm 



n 



along 

"29 Suncoast Strip' 

. . where all evidence 
proves that WSUN ad- 
vertisers get results! 



29-County Coverage 
over the heart of Flori- 
da's West Coast. 



WSUN— an all-family 
listening habit for 32 
years. 










Tampa 



Follow Sunny. Trackdown 
Venard, Rintoul, & McConnell, Inc. 

(In the South, Suh, James S. 
Ayers in Atlanta is yo man) 

The Suncoast's only 
24-hour station. 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1959 



Don't Just 
Sit There 
Say Something! 



^mg^ 


\ ^^^ 











When an advertisement just sits and 
ays nothing, people are likely to just 
sit, too — square on the hands that 
should be reaching for their wallets. 

This doesn't happen when the right 
dea gets together with words that 
et under the skin, and pictures that 
let back to the retina. 

An ad that says something makes 
>eople say: 

Papa: "Honey, we could use that!" 

Mama: "Dear, I wish we had that!" 

Junior: "/ want it, I want it, I want 
it!" 

If you want your advertising to 
nake people talk like this, you'd bet- 
:er make sure your advertising talks 
:o people. 



vVe work for the following companies: Allstate Insurance Companies • American Mineral Spirits Co. • Atchison 
Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Co. • Brown Shoe Company * Campbell Soup Company « Chrysler Corporation 
Commonwealth Edison Company and Public Service Company • The Cracker Jack Co. * The Electric Association 
Chicago) • Green Giant Company • Harris Trust and Savings Bank • The Hoover Company * Kellogg Company 
The Kendall Company • The Maytag Company • Motorola Inc. • Philip Morris, Inc. • Chas. Pfizer & Co.. Inc. 
The Pillsbury Company » The Procter & Gamble Company « The Pure Oil Company • The Pure Fuel Oil Company 
>tar-Kist Foods, Inc. * Sugar Information, Inc. • Swift & Company • Tea Council of the U. S. A., Inc. 





fj 



LEO BURNETT CO., INC. 



CHICAGO, Prudential Plaza • NEW YORK . DETROIT • HOLLYWOOD . TORONTO 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY L959 



29 



632,070 TV HOMES 
ESTABLISH CHARLOTTE-WBTV 
AS FIRST TV MARKET 
IN ENTIRE SOUTHEAST 




COMPARE THESE 



I EAST MARKETS 



WBTV-Charlotte 


632,070 


Atlanta 


579,090 


Louisville 


509,480 


Birmingham 


587,800 


Memphis 


453,240 


Charlotte Station "B" 


442,690 


Miami 


434,800 


New Orleans 


380,020 


Nashville 


366,560 


Norfolk- Portsmouth 


337,580 


Richmond 


311,680 



FIRST, BIGGEST STEP 



TO TV COVERAGE 



IN THE 



SOUTHEAST 





CHANNEL ■ 

3 


j 




UtBTV 

L A 




JEFFE 
BROADC 


CHARLOTTE 
RSON STAI 

;asting C( 


ID 

3^ 



SPONSOR 



25 |ULY 1959 




NEW DIRECTIONS: Fred Barrett, vice president and media director of BBDO, 
plans ahead to meet expanding business, flexibility and improvements of media 



BBDO'S BIG MEDIA SHAKEUP 



^ Sweeping reorganization by Madison Ave, giant 
points new philosophies for media department work 

^ BBDO creates media plans board, appoints new 
associate directors, increases emphasis on plans 



I he hottest agency media news of 
this, and the past several weeks is 
what is happening at 383 Madison 
Avenue. 

Batten. Barton. Durstine & Os- 
bom, veteran of many advertising 
wars, is completely reorganizing and 
restyling its media operation. Sweep- 
ing changes in the structure and func- 
tions of its media department are 
hound to have a profound future 



significance both to its clients and 
to media suppliers. 

For clients, it will mean still more 
depth in media planning plus a great- 
er continuity of service. 

For all media, it marks a finer ap- 
preciation of their increasing flexi- 
bility on the part of the agenc\ . 

For air media, which presently 
gets about 40' , of the estimated $220 
million BBDO billings, the reorgani- 



zation presages a media department 
which, the agency told SPONSOR in an 
exclusive interview, will be better 
equipped to take advantage of the 
feature values of both local and na- 
tional broadcast. 

Highlights of the BBDO move 
l which is not only reorganization but 
expansion as well) are: 

• Six men named to the newly- 
created posts of associate media di- 
rectors. 

• Nine men added to the New 
York media department. 

• Creation of a media plans board. 

• Improved liaison among the 
agenc\ s 15 offices. 

Heading the entire media opera- 
tion is Fred Barrett, vice president 
and media director. Prompting the 
move, according to Barrett, are new 



SPONSOR 



25 JULY 1959 



31 



BBDO'S SIX NEW MEDIA HEADS 

MICHAEL DONOVAN: Comes to BBDO from B&B where he 
was vice president and associate media director. Had been broad- 
cast media supervisor at Mc-E. He joined BBDO last month 



WILLIAM BESTE: Since 1955. a media supervisor at BBDO. 
Before that, in B&B media and research on such accounts as P&G 
General Foods, Parliament Cigarettes, Best Foods, Norivich 



HERBERT MANELOVEG: At BBDO since 1954 as assistant 
media director on Campbell Soups, B-M, Lever, General Mills. At 
B&B from 1952 to 1955, and prior to that at radio station WOR 



JOSEPH HARRIS: Media supervisor for Philco, Hit Parade 
Cigarettes, Curtis Publishing. At BBDO since 1956. Six years asst. 
advertising manager for the radio-tv division of RCA-Victor 



THEODORE MEREDITH: BBDO supervisor, DuPont account. 
Came to advertising via cattle ranching, lumbering, gold mining, 
merchant manning. Was also a Hollywood stunt man and dancer 



RICHARD WRIGHT: Before coming to BBDO in 1957. was 
nearly a decade with WJW-TV, Cleveland, where he supervised 
such CBS network-originating shows as baseball games of iveek 



^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihiiii iniiiiiiiiiiiiini mm [mum iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i mini 111111111111111111111 



agency accounts, changing media 
policies and expanded service to cli- 
ents of the BBDO agency. 

"The new organization, he says, 
"will streamline client service in line 
with far-reaching and continuing de- 
velopments in the leading media. Na- 
tional magazines, by breaking their 
press run and advertising content in- 
to regional distribution, have become 
extremely flexible. Sunday supple- 
ments are extending their circulation 
toward nationwide coverage. 

"The three television networks." 
Barrett continues, "now are equal in 
audience potential. The cost of time 
and space is increasing rapidly. All 
join to place greater demands on me- 
dia planning." 



Here are the details of the changes 
taking place: 

Six men have been named to the 
newly created posts of associate me- 
dia directors. They include one new 
executive, Michael J. Donovan who 
comes to BBDO from Benton & 
Bowles, where he was vice president 
and assistant media director. 

The other five associate media di- 
rectors have come from within BBDO. 
They are: William E. Beste, Joseph 
Harris. Herbert D. Maneloveg, Theo- 
dore R. Meredith and Richard C. 
Wright. Each will report directly to 
Barrett. 

Associate media directors will be 
in charge of various account groups. 
Within these groups will be media 



supervisors and buyers. Buyers will 
be specialists within their own media 
fields: timebuyers will be responsible 
for broadcast buys, print buyers for 
print buys. The BBDO set-up will not 
include all-media buyers. 

Nor will the reorganization affect 
the training of media personnel. The 
BBDO media analysis group which 
forms the agenc\"s training program 
and talent pool continues unchanged. 
At present, this unit is made up of 
18 young men who recently joined 
BBDO. But what is apparent is that 
the agency, at higher levels, definite- 
ly is going after experienced media 
personnel. 

To strengthen the department in 
depth, the agency has been adding 
new\ experienced media personnel. 
By the end of this month this will 
have been completed with the acqui- 
sition of the last in a string of eight. 
He is James Nance, a print media di- 
rector who is being transferred from 
BBDO's Chicago office. 

The others are: Robert Hamilton, 
former vice president in charge of 
media at C. L. Miller: Bruce Doll 
from EWR&R; Stuart Edwards. Len- 
nen & Newe'l: Sal Cusimano, G. M. 
Basford Asencv; Sam Landers, Len- 
nen & Newell: Conrad Ennis. of 
Dohertv. Clifford. Steers & Shenfield: 
Edward Kohler. Buchanan & Co. 

The new r media plans board, in ad- 
dition to Barrett, will include Edward 
C. Fieri, Jr., spot broadcast; Charles 
R. McKeever, network broadcast: 
Robert M. Anderson, trade publica- 
tions; Kent D'Alessandro. plans and 
media analysis; Louis E. Millot, Jr., 
magazines; S. Austin Brew, news- 
papers, and Daniel P. O'Grady, out- 
door. Each is a media supervisor. 

In a move to strengthen communi- 
cation among the agency's regional 
offices, Gert Scanlon has been trans- 
ferred from client contact to media 
liaison. The duties of Miss Scanlon, 
well known in air media circles, will 
consist of counseling, buying and 
publicizing availabilities in broad- 
casting. 

To understand what has taken place 
in BBDO's media department, it is 
necessary to know something of the 
over-all agency operation. 

At the top level, planning for a 
client campaign is broken between 



32 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 




SPOT ADVISOR: On the new media plans 
board is Ed Fieri, Jr., mentor for radio tv 
spot. Charles R. McKeever represents network 



two plans boards — the marketing 
plans board and the creative plans 
board. The creative plans board ob- 
viousK is concerned with develop- 
ment and execution of copy ap- 
proaches for all media. The market- 
ing plans board is involved in every 
other area of the campaign — mer- 
chandising, marketing, media and 
research. 

These two boards simultaneously 
take up the planning in their individ- 



ual spheres for every BBDO account, 
and planning begins a full fiscal year 
ahead of a campaign. Example: strat- 
egy which an agenc\ account ma; 
begin to use in the fall of I960 is 
about to be tackled now. Once 
tackled, there is no let-up. The plan- 
ning becomes a continuous operation 
stretching up to the very launching 
of a campaign — a refinement here, an 
improvement there. 

Fred Barrett, vice president and 
media director, is a member of the 
BBDO marketing plans board. 

As head of the entire media opera- 
tion. Barrett also is a member of the 
new media plans board. The associate 
media directors, responsible for vari- 
ous accounts, also report to Barrett. 
Thus he becomes a direct bridge be- 
tween marketing plans and media 
plans, involved in ever) operation 
from initial concept of a campaign 
to its launching. 

The new media plans board is a 
lesson in flexibility. It meets at no 
stated intervals, but as the occasion 
arises. It plans for every single ac- 



count, is on constant tap to tackle the 
problems of every associate media 
director. Each of the media super- 
visors who make up the board is a 
specialist in the particular field he 
represents. But this does not mean 
either that its conclaves are limited 
to these men. The board will bring 
into its meetings additional counsel, 
may call on associate media directors, 
buyers, or any other media personnel 
whose experience in some specific 
medium may throw additional light 
on a situation. 

In the course of planning an ad- 
vertising campaign, this new media 
plans board may meet time and again 
for a single account until it has per- 
fected its strategy. 

Barrett, who will be in on these 
meetings, is therefore in a position to 
carry back to the marketing plans 
board first-hand reports on the rec- 
commendations of the media board 
so that there is complete co-ordina- 
tion all along the way. 

Ultimately, the marketing plans 

I Please turn to page 76 I 



NEW TITLEHOLDERS: Here are BBDO's newly appointed associate media directors meeting with vice president Fred Barrett who is second from 
right: (I to r) Theodore Meredith, William Beste, Richard Wright, Joseph Harris (with chart) and Mike Donovan. Not present when picture 
was shot for SPONSOR was Herbert Maneloveg shown in inset. These directors report directly to Barrett who heads entire media operation 




MEDIA MARKETS 



I 




WHITHER JOE CULLIGAN? 



^ There have been months of speculation about what 
NBC's radio chief will do as his 3-year contract expires 

^ His plan: to stand pat and complete his original 
blueprint for pumping life, dollars into net radio 



INTELLECTUAL LIFE has much appeal for Joe Culligan, named honorary Doctor of Laws at 
Tampa U. last month. His commencement subject: The Responsibility Quotient (see story) 




■ or months Madison Avenue has 
buzzed about the professional destiny 
of NBC's flamboyant radio chief, 
Matthew (Joel Culligan. The buzz 
this week reached a high pitch of 
speculation. Culligan's three-year 
contract expires within a fortnight 
after an uphill fight to regain net- 
work radio's stature and to rebuild 
NBC's structure. The trade knows 
he's been offered many other top-level 
jobs, that he's interested in many 
fields, that his talents lie in several 
directions other than radio. 

A friend characterizes him as an 
improbable combination of Freud, St. 
Thomas and Machiavelli, and this 
suspicion extends throughout the ad- 
vertising and broadcast industries. 
That's why people wonder aloud 
where he'll go next month ... if any- 
where. 

Will he move laterally into high- 
salaried industry? Or to NBC's par- 
ent, RCA? Or into one of the left- 
field areas where his intellectual in- 
terests take him? Or will he stay 
with NBC in the vanguard of radio 
network innovations, making the 
crash headlines which have so char- 
acterized his three years as executive 
vice president in charge of the radio 
net and a member of the NBC Execu- 
tive Council? 

Because there's no better source 
than the obvious one, SPONSOR went 
to Joe Culligan to find out his plans 
for the present as well as the future, 
and to try to pin down some char- 
acteristics and nature of this much- 
talked-about broadcast personality. 

In three years Joe Culligan has 
drawn in most of the fine lines on 
the original network radio blueprint 
he sketched for NBC as it was im- 
mersed in the net radio doldrums of 
1956. His plan today: to ride with 
this blueprint until it's finished. When 
will that be? He doesn't know for 
sure, but the end of his network radio 
fulfillment and success is in sight. 
Here's why: 

• Programing has been complete- 
ly revamped. When he joined the 
network in his present capacity (after 
switching from tv, where he was one 
of the hottest salesmen going), the 



34 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



program schedule '"took up two and 
a half pages of solid type and was a 
gigantic mishmash." 

• He's remolded the image of the 
NBC radio network, helping it de- 
velop a personality and a function 
which had been on the decline. 

• He's kept affiliates in line, so that 
the number stands at about 200 at all 
times. He's devised new money-mak- 
ing \entures for affiliates' gain. 

• He's directed a hard-hitting 
sales, advertising and promotion 
campaign which has bagged 52/^ of 
all national- network radio business 
for NBC. 

• He's tried to isolate and enhance 
the strengths of radio and play down 
its weaknesses. 

• He's worked at building up 
radio's over-all image and fostering 
its prestige with the public, the press, 
advertisers and agencies, the affiliates. 

His first tactic in building the over- 
all corporate image of the NBC radio 
network was to improve programing. 
Among the many innovations: adding 
"high class" dramas to the morning 
schedule, when women listeners are 
busy with household chores and re- 
ceptive to listening: slotting variet\ 
shows in the afternoon, when women 
are more mobile in their daily action 
patterns; concentrating intellectual 
fare during nighttime periods, be- 
cause radio is "long on intellectual 
appeal and I at this point in tv's 
dominance! low on artistic fare." 

More specifically, he introduced 
the "hotline" concept of news every 
hour on the hour for sale by affiliates 
locally, the imaginative idea of image 
transfer — a pattern by which a visual 
tv image in a commercial is enhanced 
and furthered by radio reminders, 
the airing of the ever-popular Monitor 
through the long weekend, a series of 
"Image" program presentations which 
fosters the network's over-all objec- 
tives of making an impact on the 
various opinion-molding groups I af- 
filiates, press, public, clients ) . 

The "Image" series, limited strictl) 
to nighttime fare as a starter but 
picked up occasionallv for re-runs on 
weekends, started with an award- 
winning series of some 30 hours of 
Image Russia programing last winter. 
It was followed by about 36 hours of 
Image Minorities, concerned with the 
fact that "everyone is in some way a 
member of a minority group, and 
should therefore be concerned with 



the rights and future of all minori- 
ties," and two upcoming presenta- 
tions. Image America and Image Re- 
sponsibility. 

Image America traces the concepts 
of the Constitution and the Bill of 
Bights and appraises "where we have 
and have not lived up to them, and 
how we should proceed for the next 
five or 10 generations." The series 
on personal responsibility will sum- 
marize some of the previous "Image" 
findings, recap where it is "we have 
failed and succeeded" and specify 



with an eye patch who loves to talk" 
is necessarily a con man and a 
phoney. 

But those who begin to know him 
even a bit, throw the weight of their 
opinion in the direct ion of lrs> super- 
ficial attributes. He's a theorist who 
I mts ideas into constant practice, a 
day-to-daj operator rather than a 
corporate-planning thinker detached 
from the work-a-day chores. 

His idea of a Responsibility Quo- 
tient, for example, is new to the aca- 
demic as well as the advertising and 




BUSINESS ACUMEN comes out in carefully drawn blueprints for all phases of broadcast 
activity. One of the street's hottest salesmen, he's a writer, promotion expert, marketer 



some of the ways in which the good 
can be maximized and the negatives 
minimized. 

The entire series is planned as a 
book, and many of the scripts for the 
programs have been released to col- 
leges and universities for supplemen- 
tal Political Science and Sociology 
reading matter. 

These program concepts are not 
only designed to build NBC's image, 
prestige and potency with listeners, 
they also happen to represent verj 
personal views of Joe Culligan. He's 
a blend of an unlikely combination of 
talents which make him a practicing 
salesman, administrator, philosopher, 
intellect, conversationalist, global 
thinker and medicine man. People 
who don't know him or who see onl) 
flashes of his more ebullient self tend 
to think — as he puts it — an ""Irishman 



broadcast realms. Last month, while 
receiving an honorary Doctor of Laws 
degree at Tampa L. I lies a high 
school graduate and attended night 
school at Columbia 1. 1, he dis- 
coursed for graduates on R.Q.. "which 
I hope some day will be as important 
as the I.Q. in the appraisal of people." 
The responsibilit) factor which he 
hopes to measure land is trying to 
do so with the help of a leading 
foundation I would enable persons 
who are activeh responsible in terms 
of their community, church, political 
group, and the like, to be noted and 
rewarded for their personal interest. 

I his theme of personal responsi- 
bilit) — in a world which "has left 
tranquility and happiness, in the old 
sense of those words' far hehind 

[Please turn to page 30 I 



SPONSOH 



23 july 1039 



33 



$100,000 wedge for shelf space 



^ Cheramy switches entire budget for its April Showers 
line to tv to cash in on supermarkets toiletries boom 

^ Operators love high profit margins in health and 
beauty aids but want tv support for quick turnover 



I lie love affair between toiletries 
and supermarkets is the real thing. 

• The beauty makers want to get 
into this type of outlet because the 
high traffic means bulk sales, and 

• For their part, supermarket 
operators like beauty aids because of 



NO. 1 PROFIT ITEM in grocery depts., toiletries get going over by (l-r) Cheramy sis. mgr. Georgi, a.e. Dyson, toiletry merchandiser Feldman 




TOILETRIES: $5 BILLION 
BOOM SUPERMARKET 

LOW PROFIT ITEMS, supermarket staples like 
soaps, paper products, consume much shelf space, 
unlike health, beauty aids which have grown in food 
store volume from $340 million (1951) to $1.1 bil- 
lion. ffh\ they rate with supermarkets (which do 
68% of $48 billion food store business) is seen in 
sample from Progressive Grocer analysis of profit 
margins in 6 supermarkets with average weekly sales 
of $24,023: 

Margin per lin. 
ft. shelf space: 



GROCERY DEPT. AVERAGE 


$ .74 


BEVERAGES 


.89 


PAPER PRODUCTS 


.78 


SOAPS & DETERGENTS 


.47 


SNACKS, PARTY FOODS 


1.00 


HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS 


1.49 


SOUP, CANNED & DEHY. 


.93 


FISH, CANNED 


1.25 


VEGETABLES, CANNED 


.67 


TOBACCO 


.91 



Il!lll!llll!!l!!ll!!!!l!!!i!i|!!lll!lll '^IlllilllllllliillllllllllllllllllillllilllllilllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllliJIIIiili I 




their small physical size and high 
profit margin. 

But today's supermarkets are 
flooded with products; the problem 
is how to get on the shelves. For its 
April Showers line, Cheramy Inc. (a 
division of Houbigant Sales Corp.) 
needed a buildup of public demand 
and a voice so strong that super- 
market operators would be aware of 
the commotion. 






Spot tv seemed to be the answer. 

For Cheramy, this meant a com- 
plete reorientation of their media 
thinking, which for years had been 
directed towards romance, movie and 
general women's magazines. Cheramy 
had always figured that such a print 
combination would reach all age and 
economic levels at a reasonable price. 
In the light of todays marketing 
situation, however, this thinking had 
to be revised simply because Cheramy 
now needed something completely 
new: excitement. 



The excitement factor would give 
merchandising impetus to the three- 
month period (spring and early 
summer) into which Cheramy crams 
all its April Showers advertising for 
the year. The total advertising nut 
($100,000 by sponsor estimate I 
could not be increased. Obviously. 
Cheramy had to get the very most 
out of its tv plunge. 

The time factor pressed Cheramy 
and its agency, the Ellington Co., two 
ways: first, after making its recom- 
mendation early in the year to switch 
media, the agency had to have a cam- 
paign rolling in April. "We decided 
on a contest aimed at the youth mar- 
ket," says Franklyn Dyson, Ellington 
v.p. and account executive, ''but we 
wanted to build into it an awareness 
and interest that would give women 
of all ages an incentive to buy. 

"What we came up with was a teen- 
age beauty contest. Each contestant 
would have a veritable cross-section 
of rooters — from parent to school 



chums. But the important thing was 
to package the contest in a way that 
would maintain and build their inter- 
est over 13 weeks. 

"To do this, we needed virtually as 
many contestants as a Miss America 
contest — in each local sales area we 
wanted to hit. Teen-age dance shows 
looked like the solution." 

At this point. Burke Crotty. Elling- 
ton v.p. and radio tv head, went to 
work to determine availability and 
audience spread of this type of show. 

Crotty began in the top markets 
and worked down through 64 in all. 
Of these, he found that 41 had pro- 
grams of this type. A cross-section of 
research on the subject showed that 
49' i of the audience to this type of 
program is adult. Of further signifi- 
cance: 05' < are 18 and over. 

"Clearly," sa\s Crotty, "we could 
count on a sizable enough army of 
(Please turn to pa^e 57 ' 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



37 



YOU 

AGENCY 

GUYS 

^ West Coast tv station man complains that goofy 
agency instructions ball up films and commercials 

^ Operations manager cites some horrible examples 
of confusing wires which are causing schedule snafus 



By "Obviously 

(Name and station on 

r\. recent copy of sponsor carried 
the item that increased agency com- 
plaints to reps show alarm over the 
practice of some tv stations in run- 
ning the wrong film commercials. 

Being station personnel, we are all 
too aware we cannot afford to bite the 
hand that feeds us, but we do invite 
inspection of those agency hands — 
hands which are singularly devoid of 
a good scrubbing. We sincerely try 
to follow exactly the agency's wishes 
in scheduling a client's commercials. 
However, some of these "instructions" 
are a morass of gobble-de-gook that 
requires the services of not only Uni- 
vac, a meterologist, a code decipher- 
ing expert and an escort service, but 
also asks for an extraordinary degree 
of extra sensory-perception. 

Using blanks only for the company 
and product names, here are a few 
actual samples received at our opera- 
tions desk. 

1. The Einstein Enigma. These 
instructions were one of several for 
the same short-term order: 

"Alternate commercial 60-T-42 for 



38 



Anonymous" 

file with sponsor) 

65 r A of your schedule, 60-7 , -35 for 
25% of spots telecast and 60-T-16A 
for 10% of the scheduled 

Then, obviously fearing they had 
posed a solvable problem, they hastily 
corrected this situation a week later 
with the following: 

"We are sending you prints of 
another new commercial 60-T-il. This 
commercial is to be alternated on an 
equal basis with 60-7-42 for 65% of 
your spots. Continue to use 60-T-35 
for 25% of spots and 60-T-46A for 
10/4 of your schedule." 

Try this one for size on a five- 
spot a week order for six weeks. 

2. Frantic Frenzy. This two- 
page telegram is quoted in its entirety : 

"We are sending you revised prints 
of commercial 8-15,793. These are to 
replace, immediately upon receipt, 
the films with same number you are 
currently running. Continue to use 
prints you now have until these re- 
vised films arrive. Please have some- 
one at station in case prints arrive 
over weekend to accept prints and 
run them in earliest scheduled posi- 



tions. Please confirm your receipt 
and understanding of these instruc- 
tions by return wire or telephone to 
me." 

This provocative little gem was 
signed only with an agency name. 
Who? What account? When sched- 
uled? We have something like 3,000 
films in our commercial library — 
many with similar numbers; and we 
had roughly ten accounts running for 
this same agency at that time. It is 
extremely doubtful that most traffic 
departments possess or even have ac- 
cess to a cross-file whereby such little 
whimsies may be traced to their 
source. Needless to say, we're making 
a practice of placing such "confirma- 
tions" on a collect basis. 

3. Offhand Optimism. After 
confirmation of a two-week satura- 
tion schedule for one-minute sound- 
on-film spots, comes the fast break — 
with the receipt of this casual post 
script: 

"The following slides are enclosed 
which we would like to have you run 
for no less than 2 seconds at the end 

of the film commercials 

scheduled over your station. The at- 
tached sheet indicates which slide to 
use following the commercials. We 
would also greatly appreciate your 
writing a letter to the manager at the 
headquarters of each store for which 
you are running the slides, telling 
him the days and times when his 
slide will be shown. I would like to 
have a copy of these letters which you 
can enclose with your confirmation 
to me that the slides will be run as 
indicated. Thanking you in advance, 
I am . . ." 
I Impressive list of 9 chain stores!) 

The "attached sheet" showing rota- 
tion of film numbers and slides was 
tastefully done in tone-on-tone — 
smudgy printing on filthy paper, 
which contrived to make the whole 
mess illegible. Then, in the wild event 
we were able to figure this out and 
run it on their schedule (in spite of 
the fact the films are a full 60-sec 
onds long, with no room for a tag) 
this little communique arrives two 
days later: 

"As you know, the alternate 

spots, 60-T-23A and 60-7-241, are 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



*■*** 



(9 

o 



CAkU 



US 



being delivered to you after the start 
of your schedule, and at the present 
time you are using the original spots, 
60T-22 and 60-T-240, even though 
your present schedule calls for you to 
combine the alternates and originals." 

No, we didn't know. However, they 
shrewdly continued with: 

"Would you please indicate on this 
letter when the alternates do reach 
you and that you have gotten back 
on your schedule. . . . Please return 
this letter to us just as soon as you 
have included these alternates in your 
schedule of announcement." 

Now the creator of this masterpiece 
of clarity once again has his original 
in his possession; and, may we pre- 
dict a smashing future for him should 
he turn his talents to government 
work and put out a few booklets on 
'How to Figure Your Income Tax.'" 



4. 



Seeming Simplicity. This 
concise little epistle appears at first 
blush to be fairly reasonable: 

'Enclosed you will find the follow- 
ing 



1-minute 


20-seconds 


4-60 


4-A-20 


5-60 


5-A-20 


6-60 


6-A-20 



Please set up your schedule so that 
you will use these new films twice to 
every time you use the films sent you 
earlier — 

1-minute 20-seconds 

1-60 3-A-20 

2-60 4-A-20 

Please contact us should you have 
any questions regarding any of the 
above." 

Ha! Get that little sneaker? How 
in the devil can you use "4-A-20 ' 
twice to every once you use the same 
film? To further belie the apparent 
guilelessness of this little missive, we 
find that the minute film 2-60 is actu- 
ally completely devoid of sound track 
and cannot be used at all. Yes, we 
did have a question for the agency 
regarding the above. 

5. Unabridged and Unmiti- 
gated Gall. Here we were greeted by 
a two-page, single-spaced and tiny- 
margined letter giving complicated 
instructions for sorting through a 
total of six separate copy numbers, 17 
{Please turn to page 77) 



CALL US 




SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



YELLOW PAGES— CHICAGO STYLE 



^ Donnelley, publisher of classified directory, gets 
two-way benefits from big Chicago radio saturation 

^ 5,452 spot schedule educates customers on Yellow 
Pages use, gives merchandising hook for sale of ads 



A CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

newcomer to radio, the Reuben 
H. Donnelley Corp. is pouring a 
SPONSOR-estimated $% million into 
the market this year in a 52-week 
avalanche radio campaign on five 



Chicago stations. Yet, this heavy 
saturation schedule, one of the largest 
local campaigns on the air. involves 
no product. Instead, its chief func- 
tion is to sell an idea — See The Yel- 
low Pages! 



Underlying the consumer campaign 
is a unique merchandising device 
which utilizes the radio commercial 
jingles in a remarkably effective man. 
ner, stimulating interest in the Yellow 
Pages at the trade level. 

Donnelley's Chicago radio adver- 
tising, handled by Earle Ludgin & 
Company, is part of the Bell Tele- 
phone System's over-all national cam- 
paign for Yellow Pages. But although 
it works hand in hand with the na- 
tional campaign, the Chicago satura- 
tion is completely autonomous and 
entirely original in concept, on behalf 



fflllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll !!l!lll!llllllllllllll!ll!lllll!llllll!!llllll!!llll!llllll!!lllll!llllll!!llll!!!!llll!!lllll IIIIIIHIIIIIH 

| DONNELLEY'S RADIO AVALANCHE PLAN 

In the course of a year Donnelley will run 5,452 radio spots on five stations in the Chicago area. Their goal is 25,368 rating 
points, and their schedule is staggered in five drive periods of 11 weeks and 10 weeks duration during the year. 



II WEEKS 



10 WEEKS 



II WEEKS 



WMAQ 



WGN 



WBBM 



WJJD 



WIND 



15 spots 
per week 


10 WEEKS 


15 spots 
per week 


10 WEEKS 


15 spots 
per week 


21 spots 
per week 


21 spots 
per week 


21 spots 
per week 


40 spots 

per week 


40 spots 
per week 


40 spots 
per week 


21 spots 
per week 


21 spots 
per week 


20 spots 
per week 


20 spots 
per week 


20 spots 
per week 


20 spots 
per week 


20 spots 
per week 


30 spots 
per week 


30 spots 
per week 


30 spots 
per week 


30 spots 
per week 


30 spots 
per week 



APR. 



MAY 

126 per wk. 
(1,386 spots) 



JUNE JULY 



AUG. 



SEPT. 



OCT. 



NOV. 



71 per wk. 
(710 spots) 



126 per wk. 
(1.260 spots) 



DEC. 

71 per wk. 
( 710 spots) 



JAN. 



FEB. 



MAR. 



126 per wk. 
( 1,386 spots) 



1 ! 



illiililllliiililllllllilllillllllilillllliiliiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiH 



40 



llllllllllllllllllllllllll IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllrPl 

SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1959;! 



of Illinois Bell, t National campaign 
is handled by C&W, N.Y., for AT&T. ) 

The Reuben H. Donnelley Corp., 
publisher of over 100 classified direc- 
tories in various Illinois towns, is the 
agent for Illinois Bell which markets 
throughout the state and in the neigh- 
boring Hammond-Gary section of In- 
diana. Illinois Bell is among the 
largest of the 17-member Bell Sys- 
tem, of which AT&T is the parent 
company. 

Donnelley not only publishes the 
classified directory for Illinois Bell, 
but it also provides a sales staff of 
250 that sells advertising space in the 
Yellow Pages. 

According to George A. Rink. v.p. 
and general manager of Earle Ludgin 
& Company, "The objective of the 
Chicago campaign is. primarily, edu- 
cation. To get more people in Illinois 
Bell's area to use the Yellow Pages 
more often and for more purposes. 
We decided to concentrate the Chica- 
goland dollars on radio in order to 
reach the most people most often with 
messages of most substance. In this 
case, the substance consists of the 
variety of ways in which Who, 
What, and Where questions can be 
answered by using the Yellow Pages. 

"We chose the jingle as our vehicle 
for the usual reasons — memorability, 
entertainment and fun." 

The Yellow Pages jingle reaches 
Chicago listeners at the rate of 126 
times per week, with spots divided 
among these five stations: WMAQ. 
WGN. WBBM. WJJD. and WIND. 
(Note: For complete schedule, spot 
rotations and rating points, see box 
on the opposite page I . 

Original music for the Yellow 
Pages jingle was composed by the 
Robert Walker musical production 
company. Lyrics are written by the 
agency, under the direction of 
Florence Murdoch, group copy head. 
The producer is Clair Callihan. Lud- 
gin's radio/tv production manager. 

"The specific objective of our jingle 
approach to the commercial is to 
come as close as possible to induce 
automatic thinking of the Yellow 
Pages when listeners have a Who, 
What, Where question." says Rink. 

"Again, radio is the medium to 
achieve this end. Radio is no longer 
an entertainment medium, but a com- 



lllllllllllll 




HOW COMMERCIALS SELL ADS 



Donnelley men, selling ads in 
Yellow Pages, give prospects 
a phone number to dial, and 
hear a radio spot which men- 
tions their own type of busi- 
ness. Donnelley commercials, 
such as the one below, feature 
15 or more references to 
specific businesses I trailers, 
insurance, bakeries, etc. I . and 
salesmen say the telephone de- 
vice is a great sales-closer. 



INSTR: DA DA DA 

GIRL: Who! What! Where! 

BOY: Who has a trailer I can hire? 

GIRL : What is the name, may I inquire? 

BOY: Where can we get insured for fire? 

DUO : See the Yellow Pages! 

BOTH: Bakery shops, auto tops 

BOTH: Laundries, plumbers, birds in cages 

DUO: Who! What! Where! 

GIRL: You 11 find them there 

DUO : In the Yellow Pages! 

MUSIC UNDER FOR BACKGROUND TO ANNOUNCER 



ANCR: 



GIRL: 

BOY: 

GIRL: 

DUO: 

BOY: 

BOTH 

GIRL: 

BOY: 

DUO: 



Yes — the name, address and telephone num- 
ber of every kind of product and service is 
listed in the Yellow Pages. So, don't just 
wish you knew "Who . . . What . . .or Where." 
Use the Yellow Pages. 
Who can repair a refrigerator? 
What is the name of the decorator? 
Where can you buy an incinerator? 
See the Yellow Pages! 
Taxi cabs and dental labs 
Planes and trains, hot water gauges 
Who! What! Where! 
You'll find them there 
In the Yellow Pages! 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



41 



panionship medium — especially to the 
housewife during the day. Our strat- 
egy here, is to reach the housewife 
with our message at a time when she 
is concerned about her household 
problems. The jingles remind her that 
in the Yellow Pages she can find an- 
swers to such questions as: 'Who can 
repair a refrigerator? . . . What is 
the name of the decorator? . . . 
Where can you buy an incinerator?' ' 
Early in January of this year, the 
Ludgin Company acquired the Don- 



the Chicago market, average ratings, 
out-of-home listening, and weekly 
time spent with radio are all much 
better than the national average.'' 

To date. 14 sets of jingle lyrics 
have been prepared: eight 60-second 
and six 20's. Of these, seven are ro- 
tated on the air during each 13-week 
cycle. 

"Although we feel it takes one min- 
ute to put over the jingle message, we 
did prepare the 20"s in order to get 
some real prime time where minutes 




AMUSED by new sets of lyrics for Yellow Pages jingles, are (I to r) John Bransfield, Don- 
nelley's director of marketing services; George A. Rink, v. p. and general manager of Earle 
Ludgin & Co.; and Clair Callihan, Ludgin radio/tv production manager. Yellow Pages jingles 
are in the metropolitan Chicago area heard 52 weeks a year, as often as 126 times per week 



nelley account after presentation of 
a comprehensive study of radio vs. 
television in the Chicago area. It was 
on the basis of the study that Don- 
nelley launched the radio campaign 
in April. 

Of the radio study. Rink has this to 
say: "Our findings, based on all avail- 
able broadcast research data of the 
Chicago metropolitan area, showed 
that the majority — probably around 
75% — of the total radio audience 
here can be reached, with a good 
level of frequency, on the five stations 
we selected as dominant in the mar- 
ket. ( Based on Nielsen sets-in-use 
figures.) We determined also that in 



were not available. But our concen- 
tration is on the minute jingles," says 
Rink. 

The jingle itself is the merchandis- 
ing vehicle for the campaign. Each 
of the one-minute jingles contains an 
average of 15 references to such 
specific headings in the Yellow Pages 
as: trailers, insurance, bakeries, 
plumbers, etc. Here is how the media 
plan is merchandised to Illinois Bell 
customers: 

When a Donnelley salesman calls 
on a prospective Yellow Pages adver- 
tiser, one of the first questions gener- 
ally asked is, "What can the Yellow 
Pages do for me?" If the prospective 



client is a renter of trailers, for 
instance, he is given a specific tele- 
phone number to dial. An automatic 
answering device takes over, and the 
recorded jingle containing the trailer 
reference plays for the prospect. 

"This is one of the most practical 
and personalized ways to merchandise 
radio." Rink says, "I wish the agency 
had thought of the idea. But the Don- 
nelley sales staff came up with it, and 
to our knowledge, this is the first 
time an automatic answering device 
has ever been used to merchandise 
radio commercials. In this way, we get 
double mileage out of the jingles." 

John Bransfield, Donnelley s direc- 
tor of marketing services has this to 
say about the campaign. "While it is 
still too early to have a true feel of 
customer reaction, we have been very 
pleased with the reaction from our 
sales organization. They are enthusi- 
astic about the media-merchandising 
program, and there are indications 
that good response is received from 
their customers." 

Although the Yellow Pages cam- 
paign has just begun its second 13- 
week cycle, there have already been 
several requests from around the 
country for the strategy involved in 
the media schedule, as well as in- 
quiries concerning the lyric composi- 
tion. 

In terms of strategy, the Donnel- 
ley campaign is remarkable for at 
least three reasons, power, consisten- 
cy and the creative use of radio. At 
a time when many advertisers turn to 
radio only for short and often in- 
conclusive flights, the Ludgin Com- 
pany has not hesitated to select radio 
as its primary medium, and has built 
a solid year-round schedule of maxi- 
mum impact. 

Advertisers, agencies and radio sta- 
tions will also do well to study the 
creativity in the Donnelley approach. 
Too often radio is considered solely 
as a statistical medium — in terms o 
ratings costs and coverage. The Chi 
cago Yellow Pages campaign demon- 
strates conclusively, through its care- 
ful integration of copy and merchan- 
dising, the importance and excite- 
ment of creative ideas. 

sponsor editors, reviewing the 
Donnelley Avalanche Plan, believe it 
illustrates one of the finest, most 
imaginative ways of using the radio 
medium. ^ 



42 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



300 WAYS TO UP TV BILLING 



^ From Television Bureau of Advertising, 
here's the last word on eo-op and dealer aids 

^ More than 300 national maiiufaeturers 
offer tv the ehanee to improve hillings loeally 



^^everal weeks ago. in a two-part series. SPONSOR pointed 
out the potential of cooperative advertising funds for 
both agencies and the broadcast industry (See: "Co-op: 
air media's big enigma.'' 20 and 27 June 19591. The 
series stressed the fact that of the estimated $10 billion 
total I .S. advertising budget, about $2 billion are co-op 
dollars of which air media gets only about $400 million. It 
also showed that an estimated $250 million of funds ear- 
marked for co-op are never spent at all. 

The Television Bureau of Advertising, since 1955, has 
had a co-op advertising department dedicated to convert- 
ing national advertisers into building up co-op allowances 
for tv. and to showing local distributors and dealers how 
to put these allowances to work most profitably. The de- 



partment is headed by Lisa Gentry who. in addition to 
handling voluminous correspondence with national adver- 
tisers, distributors, retailers and member t\ stations, gets 
out an impressive pile of literature anent tv co-op plans. 
At present she is completing a full-dress book on selling t\ 
with co-op; TvB will be bringing it out soon. She also 
produces a newsletter, "Co-op News from TvB"' and an 
annual compilation of co-op data titled "Manufacturer 
Co-operative Television Flans and Dealer Aids." 

It is from the latter that sponsor reprints the list of na- 
tional advertisers that begins below. It marks the first time 
that a trade publication in this field has detailed the TvB- 
compiled data in its pages, is intended as a guide to tv 
station managements and to local agencies. It shows what 
companies in what product categories have either co-op 
allowances for dealers or distributors, and which of them 
have available commercial materials for local tie-ins. These 
materials may take the form of filmed commercials, slides. 
cop\ for announcers, fact sheets, etc. (The TvB publica- 
tion from which it is taken goes into the exact types of 
dealer aids available I . If enough follow through at the 
local level, it can mean extra dollars for tv. greater sales 
for the manufacturers. ^ 



THESE NATIONALS HAVE TV CO-OP PLANS OR AIDS 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Apparel & Accessories 

Adam Hat Mfrs. 
S. Augstein 
Berkshire Mills 

No Mend Hosiery Div. 
Blue Bell 
B.V.D. Co. 

College Town of Boston 
H. Daroff 

Evans Case Co. * 

Fashion Park 
H. W. Gossard 
Hanes Knitting 
Hat Corp. of America 
Jane Holly 
F. Jacobson 
Jantzen 

Foundation Div. 
Kayser-Roth Hosiery 

Mojud-Kayser Div. 
Koret of California 
Jonathan Logan 
Manchester Hosiery Mills 
Manhattan Shirt 
Mr. Mort 
Munsingwear 

Womens-Girls Div. 
Palm Beach Co. 
Peter Pan Foundations 
Phillips-Van Heusen 



Revelation Bras 

Rivoli Corset 

Sarong 

Standard Knitting Mills 

Strouse, Adler 

Truval Shirt 

Max Udell Sons 

Appliances 

Admiral 

Air-Way Industries 
Amana Refrigeration 
American Motors 

Kelvinator Div. 
American Rad. & Standard 

Sanit. Corp. Div. for 

Youngstown Kitchens 
Avco Mfg. 

American Kitchens Div. 
Bissell Carpet Sweeper 
Blackstone 
Casco Prod. 

Appliance Div. 
Chambers Built-lns 
Consolidated Sewing 

Machine Corp. 
Cribben & Sexton 
Dominion Elec. 
Dormeyer 
Florence Stove 



Allow- 




Other 




Allow- 


Other 


ance 


Films 


material 




ance 


Films material 


* 






General Electric Dish- 






* 






washer and Disposal 






* 


* 




Dept. 


* 


* 


* 


* 




Home Laundry Dept. 


* 


* 


* 




* 


Home Refrig. Dept. 


* 


* 


* 


* 




Portable Appl. Dept. 


* 


* 


* 




* 


Vacuum Cleaner Dept. 
General Motors 


* 










Frigidaire Div. 


* 


* * 


* 




* 


Glenwood Range 


* 










Hamilton Mfg. 






* 


* 




Home Appl. Div. 
Hobart Mfg. 




* 








Kitchen Aid Div. 


* 


* 








Hoover 


* 


* 








Hotpoint 


* 


* 


* 


* 




Hupp 












Gibson Refrig. Co. 


* 


* 








Ironrite 


* 


* 








James 


* 


* 








Landers, Frary & Clark 


* 


* 








Lewyt 
McGraw-Edison 


* 




* 


* 




Speed Queen Div. 


* 


* 


* 


* 




Magic Chef 


* 










Manitowoc Equip. Works 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


Maytag 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


Monitor Equip. 


* 


* * 


* 




* 


Necchi Sewing Machine 


* 


* 


* 




* 


Norge Sales 


* 


* . 


* 






I Please turn to page (>!'> i 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



13 



Hometown corn wins space battle 






^ Radio opens up supermarket freezers and display 
area for regional food packer who needed space fast 

^ Local copy appeals, Pennsylvania Dutch image give 
Cope high, fast impact with both stores and consumers 



I n the face of year-round national 
brand competition, how do you get 
freezer and display space for a prod- 
uct that's both regional and seasonal? 
Without high quality and fast turn- 
over, you can't make a dent. More- 
over, cost factors mean that you have 
to do the job in a hurry. An expen- 
sive build-up is beyond the range of 



most regional advertising budgets. 

But this regional, seasonal food 
packer — caught in the ever-tightening 
squeeze for supermarket space — 
licked the problem with a big strategy 
switch: 

For its dried, canned and frozen 
corn, the John Cope Co. in Manheim, 
Pa., went to work shucking all but 



GIANT DISPLAYS reached stores when Uncle "Chon" became overnight celebrity via radio 
campaign designed by (l-r) Cope sales mgr. Mel Heisey, John Cope, Kamp a.e. Jon Simpson 



*••*»* #.»»»•*« 




1 

the local kernel from its advertising. 
In brand identification, copy appeals, 
dealer merchandising — every angle 
would have a home-town smack to it. 

"For brand identification, we 
launched squarely into dialect," says 
Jon Simpson, account executive at 
the William B. Kamp agency in Lan- 
caster. "To plant the name John Cope 
firmly in the consumer's mind, we 
roughed out a Pennsylvania Dutch 
farmer, complete with Amish beard, 
brim hat and eyeglasses. We called 
him Uncle "Chon." We knew that 
life-size, he would make a well-nigh 
irresistible point-of-sale piece. But we 
knew that we'd have to make him 
well known in a hurry or he'd never 
see a supermarket aisle." 

The problem: how to create a 
short-order local celebrity. Time was 
a factor because Cope's corn sales 
reach their peak in November, and 
this is the time when their advertis- 
ing is concentrated. "We needed fre- 
quency, impact and plenty of excite- 
ment in a hurry." says Simpson. Bill- 
boards spotted close to major food 
stores, would provide good reminder 
advertising, but to put over the char- 
acter, personality and wisdom of 
Uncle "Chon," spot radio was singled 
out in this combination: 

• Jingle sung by Uncle "Chon," 
followed by 

• Straight and ad-lib copy by local 
personalities, plus 

• Plenty of local hoopla in the 
form of contests, identification with 
station personalities, etc. 

In November, 1958, 900 30-second 
spots were scheduled (three a day 
throughout the day I in ten marketing 
areas. Aware of the time factor, sta- 
tions went to work in a hurry adding 
the local flavor and identification 
Cope needed. "One example," says 
Simpson, "was a 'tape contest' on 
WKAP in the Dopey Duncan pro- 
gram, in which Cope offered to pay 
the contestant's entire weekly grocery 
bill for a prize-winning jingle. The 
contest produced excellent results," 
he adds, "not only increasing sales, 
but getting us new retail outlets." In 
fact, so successful was this particular 
program for Cope, that "Dopey Dun- 
can" ( Luther Gheringer, a Pennsyl- 
vania Dutchman himself) is record- 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



ing the Uncle "Chun" jingles lor use 
this fall. 

Here's the way it hreaks down : 

• Radio. 3,360 30-second an- 
nouncements (jingle and live cop) I. 

• Billboards. 100 24-sheets, spotted 
as close as possible to point of sale. 

Number of radio markets will be 
increased from 10 to 26. Here's the 
big difference, according to Simpson: 
"Instead of concentrating the radio 
activity to six weeks, the increased 
number of stations will enable us to 
spread it over a 12-week period. Be- 
cause the pattern of stations contains 
many overlapping areas, we are di- 
viding the stations into two groups. 
One group will start on 5 October. 
the other on 12 October. Both groups 
will carry alternate week schedules. 
Thus, each group will carry six full 
weeks of spots, though the total effort 
will cover 12 weeks. Drawing on last 
year's experience, we will make even 
greater use of strong local personali- 
ties." Here's the station list: 

WKAP, Allentown 

WCHA, Chambersburg 

WHVR, Hanover 

WLBR, Lebanon 

WPAZ, Pottstown 

WTRN, Tyrone 

WRAK. Williamsport 

WCNR, Bloomsburg 

WRCV, Phila. 

WVAM, Altoona 

WCED, Dubois 

WCBM, Harrisburg 

WKVA, Lewistown 

WEEU, Reading 

WJEJ, Hagerstown, Md. 

WADC, Akron, Ohio 

WHJB. Greensburg 

WKOK, Sunburx 

WBFD. Bedford 

WGET, Gettysburg 

WCRO, Johnstown 

WNAR, Norristown 

WGCB, Red Lion 

WSBA, York 

WHBC, Canton. Ohio 

WLAN, Lancaster 
"As a result of last year's cam- 
paign."' says Cope sales manager Mel 
Heisey. "practically all the salesman 
has to do now is tell the dealer about 
our fall plans to insure an order. As 
for the past year," he told sponsor, 
"sales set an all-time record." ^ 



SPONSOR 



25 .iuly 1959 




MOCK MARINE LANDING was highlight of WPDQ, Jacksonville, Fla., stunt over 4 July 
weekend for 3,000 people during invasion of uninhabited island in the St. John's River 



U.S. MARINES CAPTURE 
FLORIDA RADIO STATION 



I 



f you have any lingering doubts 
about the vitality of American radio 
stations, and their ability to stir up 
excitement, enthusiasm and commu- 
nity interest at the local level, you'd 
have done well to find yourself on 
the newly dredged shores of Holiday 
Island, near the center of Jackson- 
ville. Florida a few weeks ago. 

There, as 3,000 spectators oohed 
and ahhed ( they had come by heli- 
copters, water skis and special ferries) . 
a company of U.S. Marines in full 
battledress. swarmed out of their as- 
sault boats, stormed the beach and, 
with machine guns blazing, surround- 
ed and "captured" the mobile studio 
of a Jacksonville radio station. 

The mock attack launched a week- 
long "promotion spectacular" for 
station WPDQ. and the Marines, after 
sending out "Marine propaganda" 
from their new command post, retired 
gratefully to the soft-drink stands 
provided by the station management. 

For WPDQ. the regeneration of 
uninhabited Holiday Island (previ- 
ously called Mud. Peyton or Hog 
Island I served a threefold purpose. 
It provided an exciting Fourth of 
July celebration, it ser\ed to promote 



National Boat Safety week, and il 
demonstrated to Jacksonville citizens 
the island's recreational potential. 

Underlying all these was the goal 
that is axiomatic in modern radio — 
to improve listener relations by estab- 
lishing the station as an active, in- 
tegral, cooperative element in com- 
munity affairs. 

For weeks before the Fourth. 
WPDQ worked with Jacksonville re- 
tailers and civic groups, and even 
persuaded the Coast Guard and Na\ \ 
to bring in bulldozers and clear a 
strip of beach. The closeness of the 
island to the city was a natural plus 
in plugging its unexploited recrea- 
tional facilities. 

In addition to the Marine invasion, 
other weekend features included spe- 
cial events broadcasts. safet\ inspec- 
tion of boats, a fishing contest, a Red 
Cross boating demonstration, exhibit 
of an Air Force missile and fire- 
works. I he original idea for the pro- 
motion of Holiday Island was worked 
out by WPDQ with the Exchange 
Club of Jacksonville. 

Harr\ Radcliffe. Advertising, of 
Jacksonville, was the agency involved 
in the WPDQ Holiday Island promo- 
tion. & 



15 



As tape use becomes widespread, SPONSOR ASKS: 



Is there a real film-tape 







With the first year of extensive 
application of tape by both agen- 
cies and producers, film people 
discuss film's relation to tape 

Robert L. Lawrence, pres., Robert 

Lawrence Prod., N. Y ., Hollywood, Toronto 

In television commercials, tape will 
some day challenge the supremacy of 
film. When this happens, a debate 



No— 
and tape 
"advantages" 
are illusory 



between the forces of tape and of film 
will be healthful for the industry. 

Today, however, any semblance of 
such a conflict is artificial. 

In commercials today, video tape 
is very capable of replacing and im- 
proving upon "live" commercials. It 
carries all the advantages of "live," 
it even looks "live," and it overcomes 
the risks of live television. 

But video tape today, and for a 
long time to come, will not replace 
nor improve upon filmed commer- 
cials. Its supposed advantages over 
film are illusory. It is faster than 
film. It is sometimes cheaper. It is 
more "live'-looking. Yet these are 
the same advantages that "live" has 
claimed over film since the birth of 
commercials. And still filmed com- 
mercials have predominated. 

Where the goal is instant commer- 
cials, where the goal is "live" quality, 
where the goal is economy, then tape 
sometimes has it over film. 

But the goal, among agencies and 
responsible producers, since we have 
been in this business, has always been 
creativity and quality — making the 
best possible commercials we know 
how, no matter what the gimmick or 
place. This goal has led us to Holly- 
wood, it has taken us to Canada, it 
has induced us to open animation 
studios, it has won us the top awards, 
and it has resulted in some of the 



best commercials on television today. 
Some day. and it may be very soon, 
it will lead us to tape. 

I nfortunately, the ballyhoo attend- 
ing tape has suggested to some that 
tape will replace creativity, that a new 
machine will out-date talent, that a 
new device will preclude the need for 
imaginative and expert production. 
Such an impression is as much a dis- 
service to the tape industry as it is to 
the entire commercial industry. 

Today, the best commercials are 
being made on film. Reports of tapes 
alleged challenge to filmed commer- 
cials are premature. When such a 
challenge can sensibly be made, a 
film-tape conflict will emerge. 

Marvin Rothenberg, v.p., prod.-dir., 
MPO Television Films, Inc., New York 

We not only recognize the great 
developments in video tape, but fully 
intend to be the advertising agency 



Each has a 
separate 
function in 
today's 
production 



service arm in this medium when and 
if tape proves practical for the wide 
range of television commercials. 

But up to now tape's biggest usage 
has been as an aid to "live" tv in 
delayed broadcasts and as a substitute 
for traditionally "live" commercials. 
Responsible agency people and com- 
mercial producers are aware of the 
technical limitations of tape — diffi- 
culty in editing, lack of opticals. ani- 
mation, special matteing, slow motion 
and high speed. 

Despite all realistic appraisals of 
tapes current achievements, and the 
unsolved problems still to be over- 
come, we hear a great deal of loose, 
irresponsible talk about tape replac- 
ing film in its entirety. This some- 
times results in pressure being 
brought upon agencies and sponsors 
to tape their commercials in cases 




where this technique is far from the 
best. 

The continuing growth of the 
filmed commercial industry, in spite 
of the mass of propaganda being cir- 
culated by tape's advocates, is ex- 
plained by a truism: the best filmed 
commercials are the ones that cannot 
be shot in "live technique." The 
flexibility of sequence-by-sequence 
cinematic method, the technical ver- 
satility of film and the sponsor's need 
for commercials that integrate into 
filmed programing make an eloquent 
case for television's continued use of 
film for a long time to come. 

A recent case in point: An agency 
commissioned a major tape producer 
to do a series of cigarette commer- 
cials featuring a well-known televi- 
sion news personality. The results 
were so bad that the commercials 
were junked. The agency then went 
to a network. The results were better, 
but since use of the tape was limited, 
kinescopes were made for national 
distribution. Reproduction on these 
were so unsatisfactory that the client 
turned them down. 

After spending money in two 
places, the agency came to MPO. We 
photographed the series on film using 
one camera, completing the job in the 
same time that the tape producers 
needed with three cameras. Because 
we shot in sequences, the acting was 
more convincing, the lighting was 
better and the product inserts had 
more impact. The cost of the entire 
series was the same. 

The conclusion is obvious. There 
is no real film-tape controversy. Just 
exaggerated claims on one side and 
proven performance on the other. 

Nathan Zucker, pres. Dynamic Film, 
Inc., New York 

Definitely not — because when you 
are talking about film and video tape 
you are talking about two different 
things. True they are both visual 
recording devices and as such, video 
tape is an extremely interesting de- 
vice. 

The uses of video tape will grow as 
the uses of film have continued to 






46 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



conflict? 



grow, hut when unique and creative 
visual and sound effects are needed 
the experience and background of the 
qualified producer can far outstrip 
the efforts put out by the video tape 
operators for the simple reason that 
they have spent years in experimenta- 
tion, research and practice, in de- 
veloping those particular qualities. 

I feel there is a great mistake being 
made when a controversy is developed 
between film and video tape. The film 
producers have no fight with tape, 
rather, they are intrigued by the 
possibilities it can lend to their own 
production operations and already 
they are experimenting on adapting 
the advantages of tape to the qualit) 
of their productions. It will be the 
eventual marriage of these two forms 
of visual art, combining the better 



Film and 
tape are two 
different 
things 



characteristics of both, which will be 
the ultimate in visual reproduction. 

Let me also go on record on 
another phase of this subject. Ad- 
vocates of tape have been proclaim- 
ing its eventual replacement of film 
for various aspects of television. Film 
commercials, programing, etc. Unfor- 
tunately these people are unknowingly 
exposing the most vulnerable aspect 
of tape. The creative and qualitative 
requirements of visual recording. 

The reason for the tremendous use 
of film, not only in tv. but also in 
ever) other branch of communication, 
has been that the camera as used by 
qualified film producers, can achieve 
visual effects and creative qualities 
far superior to anything done live. 

It is not consistent with the trend 
to mure creative thinking on the part 
of advertising agencies, or anyone 
else for that matter, that a photo- 
graph of an) live action fulfills a 

l Please turn to page 04 I 






YOUR SALES MESSAGE 
IS AS PERSONAL 
AND DISTINCTIVE AS 
A SIGNATURE 



When it is delivered on 
KLZ RADIO Denver's 
personality station! 



KLZ RADIO 
personalities come 
through to the listener 
like old friends. . . 
with a believable 
sales story. 



Names like Starr Yelland, 
Art Gow, Pat Gay 
and Johnny Wilcox are 
household words in Denver. 



When they speak, Denver 
listens and BUYS! 



LET THESE KLZ RADIO 
AIR SALESMEN SELL 
FOR YOU! 



Call your KATZ man or 
LEE FONDREN, Denver. 



KLZ-Radio 



560 ON THE DIAL IN DENVER 



CBS FOR THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN AREA 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



47 



Capsule case histories of successful 
local and regional radio campaigns 



RADIO RESULTS 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

SPONSOR: Henderson's Curb Market AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Henderson's Curb Market, which 
deals in general merchandise, recently purchased a schedule 
on KNOE, Monroe from 7 to 10 p.m., Monday through 
Friday. The owner, Roy Henderson, was not entirely sold 
on nighttime radio, so at the suggestion of Edd Routt, v. p. 
and general manager of KNOE, test announcements were 
scheduled offering a lighter to the first 12 customers who 
came to the store as a result of the KNOE announcements. 
Within 10 minutes Henderson's had given away the last 
lighter, and decided to continue its plan to sponsor Hender- 
son' s Party Line. Henderson's is open 24 hours a day, but 
their midnight to 6 a.m. business did not justify expenses. 
Shortly after the store began its radio schedule Henderson 
announced they would close at midnight. "We received so 
many complaints from irate listeners that we were forced to 
remain open 24 hours," he said. "Sales have risen consider- 
ably and we plan to continue sponsorship of our program." 

KNOE, Monroe, La. Program 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

SPONSOR: W. T. Grant Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: A few months ago the W. T. Grant 
Co., McCook, Nebr., decided to try a package of one-minute 
announcements on KXXX, Colby, Kansas, a Farm & Home 
Radio station. McCook is located more than 80 miles from 
Colby, has its own radio station and daily newspaper. Grant's 
discontinued its other advertising during its campaign on 
KXXX in order to pinpoint the cause of any sales increase. 
For two weeks prior to the KXXX schedule, Grant's had a 
traffic count of 2,193 and 2,043 respectively. During the 
week the spot schedule ran, the store's traffic count jumped 
to 2,842 — an increase of 39%. In addition, Grant's showed 
a 62% gain in volume over the two weeks prior to the sched- 
ule. "Even at this distance and under the fire of local com- 
petition, KXXX was able to outproduce in a way my other 
advertising could not do," stated Grant's John Kelley. "I 
am well pleased with the results of this campaign and am 
planning to use similar schedules in upcoming promotions.'' 



FURNITURE 

SPONSOR: Gibson Furniture Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: The Gibson Co., Tuscaloosa. Ala., 
had advertised its furniture and appliance lines in news- 
papers, and results were only fair. It decided to try radio, 
but wanted a schedule that would give the best possible ad- 
vantage in terms of programing, audience and selling. The 
answer seemed to be a schedule of participations running for 
six weeks on WJRD's Homemakers Festival, a special pro- 
gram featuring booking, home furnishing and fashion items. 
Results: During the initial schedule business at Gibson s has 
increased about 40%, and with additional schedules, has 
sustained itself. L. E. Maze, Gibson's mgr., attributes the 
success of the advertising to: 1) Pitch and programing are 
easily integrated. 2) A highly selective audience, with waste 
circulation kept to a minimum. 3) The show, broadcast 
from WJRD's auditorium, attracts a large live audience. 
"No other programing," Maze said, "could give us this 
kind of results. We feel pinpointing an audience is vital." 
WJRD, Tuscaloosa Program 

FINANCE 

SPONSOR: Seattle 1st Loan Co. AGENCY: Direct 

Capsule case history: Seattle 1st Loan Co., with branches 
throughout Washington State, became concerned with the 
poor results of its established advertising. The advertiser 
had allotted a large budget to print, and had plunged into 
newspaper ads, in color and with detailed copy, to sell 
"Ready Credit." Reaction was negligible. Consensus was 
that the firm's newspaper exposure was weak, and that 
print lacked the impact necessary to sell credit in today's 
market. One branch felt that radio might be the answer, and 
it purchased a short-term schedule on KPQ at a cost of $152 
as a test. Results were immediate: business jumped at this 
branch, on some days as much as 50% over the previous 
dollar volume lent out in Seattle. Seattle 1st further reported 
that not only had the schedule been its most effective adver- 
tising, but was the lowest cost of all media used in terms of 
returns per advertising dollar spent. The over-all result has 
been a new approach to its advertising for all branches. 



KXXX, Colby, Kans. 



48 



Announcements KPQ, Seattle 



SPONSOR 



Announcements 



25 july 1959 




tam^mtOKmrnm 



A "BUMPER CROP" 
WE DIDN'T "PLANT" ! 

Would that all ads were this simple and beautiful! We 
ran a bumper strip promotion a while back, and the 
response was substantial. But little did we realize what 
a "depth reaction" we had achieved until this unsolicited 
picture arrived in the mail. No pious pronouncements 
from us about these youngsters being future WWDC 
customers for you. We'll let the photo — and the spirit 
that prompted it — speak for itself. We add only this — 
as well as being Washington, D. C.'s #1 radio station 
(May Pulse), we are now "the mike behind the bike"! 

WWDC 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY JOHN BLAIR & CO. 



Radio Washington 



July 1959 



49 



WHEELING 

37 t *h TV 

MARKET 

* Television Magazine 8/1/58 

One Station Sells Big 
Booming Ohio Valley 



NO. 13 IN A SERIES: 

CHEMICALS 




With the deep salt wells supplying the 
essentia] brine, and the broad Ohio 
River furnishing economical transporta- 
tion facilities, a rich, thriving chemical 
industry has arisen in the bountiful 
WTRF-TV area. Typical is the Colum- 
bia-Southern Chemical Corporation at 
Natirum, W. Va., just south of Wheel- 
ing. Here more than 1,000 employees 
are engaged in the production of chlo- 
rine, caustic soda, chlorinated hydro- 
carbons, ammonia and titanium tetra- 
chloride. The more than $5 million an- 
nual payroll dollars help make the 
WTRF-TV 39-county area a super mar- 
ket for alert advertisers. 

For complete merchandising service and 
availabilities, call Bob Ferguson, VP 
and General Mgr., at CEdar 2-7777. 



National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Company 



wt rf t v 



Wheeling 7, West Va. 






316,000 waits |J B C "etwork color 



CULLIGAN 

{Continued from page 35) 

extends to broadcasting and adver- 
tising. He has disdain for the stand- 
patters and the stay-putters, thinks 
men of reflection and reason contrib- 
ute most to action which counts. 

Joe Culligan reserves a portion of 
each day to reflect. His reflection 
may be spurred by reading (at least 
three books a week for the past five 
years: currently a U. of Michigan 
history series, a Toynbee book and 
a mystery thriller, some philosophy 
hy Ortega I or listening to music 
( Russian music has been a special 
study for the past two years) or even 
staring into clouds from a plane win- 
dow ( he's on trips at least twice a 
month ) . But the reflection is earth- 
hound, leading to such specifics as 
the over-all strategy which he devised 
three years ago for NBC, and from 
which he has not deviated. "The 
means may be changed many times," 
he says, "but the basic approach to 
what we want has never been altered." • 

In his view, "Reasoning impels ac- 
tion: it's the ergo or the therefore." 
He wonders whatever happened to the 
''therefore'' — the simple conclusion 
from which two is based on the prem- 
ise of one added to one. 

In reflection, he has come to many 
conclusions about radio. He thinks 
networks inevitably must move into 
some form of transcribed or taped 
program service for affiliates, and 
that the best kind of programing will 
continue to be news and public serv- 
ice offerings, and music. 

"You can't solve a problem unless 
you state it. We've stated it with ra- 
dio. We know there's no one big vic- 
tory but, instead, there is a series of 
small successes which add up." 

"Tv is the entertainment medium, ' 
except for music; radio's forte is an 
intellectual appeal based on broad 
news and public service coverage." 
He sees all of the networks rising 
slowly from the current plateau of 
income after an inpouring of faith 
and advertiser money which enables 
them to expand news and writing 
staffs, stress quality and service. 

Network radio is an expert com- 
munications system, but "it matters 
little if your communication isn't 
sound and clear and well thought 
out."' Radio's strengths also lie in 
its mobility and portability, the fact 
that it goes everywhere with people, 
and in its appeal to the imagination. 



"That's really why radio has an 
intellectual appeal, though that mav 
be a misunderstood adjective. It en- 
courages people to think and to 
imagine, and some people would 
rather do this than take the easy way 
out with the kind of spoon-feeding 
you get in tv." 

Radio "can't hold on to its old 
forms and live in this tv age. Network 
radio was a patched up thing collaps- 
ing slowly, but we established some 
hallmarks and milestones in the re- 
building process," he comments. 

He sees the average market five 
years from now as having a top inde- 
pendent and a top network affiliate 
switching for No. 1 market position, 
with a diminution of straight music 
and news activity. His thinking: a 
strong independent should and will 
have to build a local news department 
of competent people. 

Joe Culligan is a man of many in- 
terests as well as all-media experience. 
He's a former space salesman, movie 
production executive, tv sales chief. 
He's still a marketing man and a 
writer. He's spoken on highly in- 
dividualized Culligan themes before 
a dozen college groups in the past 
year, and is currently working with 
a second major foundation on the 
development of a bridge city — a plan 
by which the excess population would 
be accommodated by cities built as 
bridges over bodies of water. 

The bridge city plan is detailed in 
a seven-page document which is con- 
cerned with the fact that there will 
be seven billion people in the world 
by the year 2,000 contrasted with 
only two billion now. "One way to 
absorb this exploding population is 
to get off the planet, and this we'll 
do without doubt. But we need also 
to find more living and working and 
growing space here." 

He delights in vocal fisticuffs with 
all comers, and in less volatile activi- 
ties, such as weekend golfing and su- 
pervising pony rides for his four 
youngsters in suburban Rye. 

Joe Culligan tends to agree with 
his image as described by the friend 
who said he was a mixture of St. 
Thomas, Freud and Machiavelli. ^ 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



50 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



SPONSOR'S 13th 

AIR 

MEDIA 

BASICS 



A valuable desk-tool. 
Out this week! 




ALWAYS... 
a jump ahead 



The vibrant enthusiasm of 
staying a jump ahead of our 
contemporaries is a vital part 
of all personnel at KONO 
in San Antonio. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
listeners' ears keenly tuned 
to the times . . . for first 
in news . . . finest in music. 

It's an enthusiasm that keeps 
San Antonio's largest radio 
audience buying at fever pitch . . 
day after day. 

For remarkable facts about the 
"jump-ahead" KONO . . . see your 

KATZ AGENCY 

REPRESENTATIVE 

5000 Watts • 860 KC 




JACK ROTH, Mgr. 

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



52 




National and regional buys 
in work now or recently completed 



SPOT BUYS 



TV BUYS 

The Nestle Co., Inc., White Plains, N. Y. : Campaign gets off in 
top markets for Zip, a chocolate syrup additive. Schedules start 3 
August and run through December, with mostly kid show participa- 
tions. Buyer: Enid Cohn. Agency: McCann-Erickson, New York. 

Kellogg Co., Battle Creek: Supplementing half-hour kid strips with 
late afternoon minutes, nighttime minutes and chains. 13-week flights 
start 3 August. Buyer: Tom Brennan. Agency: Leo Burnett, Chicago. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis: Schedules kick off late this month 
in scattered markets for its new Caramel Puffs cereal, and run 
through December. Daytime minutes in and around kid's shows are 
being placed. Buyer: Roy Terzi. Agency: Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, 
New York. 

Helena Rubenstein, Inc., New York: Schedules are being placed 
for its various cosmetic lines, to begin 8 August and run through 
mid-December in about 28 markets. Night minutes are being used, 
with frequencies varying. Buyer: Maxine Cohn. Agency: Ogilvy, 
Benson & Mather, New York. 

Pillsbury Co., Minneapolis: Going into selected markets with sched- 
ules for its Refrigerated Coffee Cake. Flights are for six weeks; day- 
time minutes. Buyer: Rudy Marti. Agency: Campbell-Mithun, Min- 
neapolis. 

The Quaker Oars Co., Chicago: Buying half hours for Aunt Jemima 
and Ken-L products in all West Coast markets except L.A. Schedules 
start late September for 40 weeks. Buyer: Harry Furlong. Agency: 
J. Walter Thompson, Chicago. 

Procter & Camble Co., Cincinnati: Some new activity in various 
markets for Camay Soap beginning late this month. Daytime minutes 
are being used, frequencies depending on market. Agency: Leo Bur- 
nett, Chicago. 

RADIO BUYS 

Gillette Co., Boston: Campaign to reach teenagers is being prepared 
for its adjustable razor. Total number of markets as yet has not been 
determined, but it will be a major promotion, with minute announce- 
ments in the very top d.j. shows throughout the country. Buyer: Ray 
Stone. Agency: Maxon, Inc., New York. 

National Cranberry Assn., Hanson, Mass.: Push for Ocean Spray 
Cranberry Juice starts 3 August in top markets. Daytime minutes are 
being set for 13 to 26 weeks, depending on market. Buyer: Trow 
Elliman. Agency: BBDO, New York. 

American Can Co., New York: Initiating a campaign in about 20 
markets to promote the sale of beer in cans. Four-week flights, day- 
time minutes, start 3 August. Buyer: Joe Burbeck. Agency: Compton 
Adv.. New York. 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



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starring Richard Greene... a proven success 
for 4 years on network . . . now available in 

exciting episodes for strip programming! 




A powerful film library of dramatic adventures . . . each one a different 

exploit of America's favorite hero! This great show has won critical acclaim 

from educators and teachers everywhere . . . hearty approval from parents 

and children. Sponsors report tremendous rewards in sales and brand identification. 

ROBIN HOOD PROMOTIONS ARE READY AND WAITING! 

Over 33 approved and popular tie-in promotional items built around Robin Hood 
make this one of the most importantly promotable shows ever presented! 



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Response to Robin Hood* has 
been proved in four success- 
ful years of network. Now, 
top, ARB ratings give Robin 
Hood a terrific send-off for 
syndication. . . with ra t ings 
still going up! ■ Reaction 
is quick: A Philadelphia 
station held a contest based 
on a sponsor's product... 
received over 28,000 replies 
in one month! 




OFFICIAL FILMS, INC. 



25 West 45th Street 
New York 36, N. Y. 
PLaza 7-0100 



what a feather in your cap 
when you strip-program Robin Hood 



HERAMY 

Continued from page 37) 

lothers — as well as chums, boy- 

iends, etc. — to contribute entries, 
otes and sales." 

A large crop of contestants meant 
ifficient time to parade them on tele- 
ision — the second time element. 
ays a.e. Dyson, "One 15-minute par- 
cipation per week in about 15 mar- 
eta uas all the budget would allow, 
nd 13 weeks was all the time we had. 
Ve wanted to run through 36 con- 
stants per city, devoting six weeks 
f the campaign to this; the remain- 
ig seven to introduction (2 weeks) 
nd wrap-up (five weeks)." 

The obvious conclusion : the con- 
sts would have to be made part of 
le shows. And the obvious prob- 
■m: to sell the stations on the idea 
nd to show them it wouldn't be as 
ig a job as it sounded." 

Specifically, the station and pro- 
ram personality would: 

(1) Choose six contestants per 
ireek for six weeks from photograph 
ii tries 

I 2 ) Provide one-minute interviews 
uth each during the weekly April 
Showers participation 

i 3 I Tabulate the votes ( a postcard 
runted for one vote, proof of pur- 
:hase 25) 

l 1 I Shoot an interview kine of the 
ocal winner 

i 5 1 Ship kine to New York for 
udging of national winner by 
Iheramy. 

By letter and telephone, the agency 
vas able to line up virtually all the 
narkets it was after: New York, Chi- 
ago, Detroit, Boston, Pittsburgh, 
Washington. Baltimore. St. Louis. 
Cleveland. Dallas-Ft. Worth, Minne- 
ipolis-St. Paul, Columbus, Cincin- 
nati. Oklahoma City, Tulsa. 

Stations were supplied with pro- 
duction kits containing: 

• Over-all instructions 

• Outline script for each week of 
the campaign 

• Promotional material 

• Recordings of theme music 
i limited rights to the old "April 
Showers" standby were purchased) 

• Two commercials; a 90-second 
contest commercial for use during 
the first eight weeks, a 60-second 
product commercial to be used 
during the last five weeks while the 
national winner was being selected. 

Notably absent from this campaign 



were the following stock ingredients 
most campaigns rely on heavily : 

• Station merchandising. In-store 
activity by the stations was not re- 
quested by Cheramy • ( "After all," 
says Dyson, "they were doing enough 
as it was" I . Because of the time ele- 
ment involved, the agency itself was 
able to do very little at this level. 
Plainly, the excitement of the contest 
would have to carry the campaign. 

• Easy-to-remove proof of pur- 
chase. The time element also pre- 
vented Cheramy from producing a 
standard, easy-to-remove device which 
could be torn from all products. In- 
stead, the metal cap on the talc had 
to be stepped on or otherwise flattened 
(under postal regulations) before 
mailing; the rim had to be removed 
from the plastic top of the deodorant 
talc package; the paper liner inside 
the can of dusting powder had to be 
fished out. "In other words." says 
Dyson, "a real will to send in proof 
of purchase had to exist." 

On top of this, it often required 
real ingenuity on the part of station 
personalities to demonstrate the nec- 
essary trampling, cutting or tearing 
involved in reducing the cap or ex- 
tracting the liner. 

With these handicaps on the one 
hand and advantages (a full 15-min- 
ute segment built around the promo- 
tion) on the other, Cheramy 's 13- 
week push for increased shelf space 
and new accounts began. 

From an early check with stations, 
it became obvious that most of the 
contestants were being entered by 
persons other than the entry herself. 
In other words, while Cheramv was 
capitalizing on the teen-age participa- 
tion angle, the audience was not 
limited to this group. 

The contestants, however, took an 
active interest in matters once they 
had been entered. One contestant in 
Tulsa talked a supermarket manager 
into setting up an April Showers 
stand close to the check-out counter 
and letting her personally sell "votes" 
for herself. She liquidated 10 dozen 
deodorant talcs in three hours. 

Interest in the high schools was 
spontaneous, too. One high school 
principal made a personal reminder 
over the loud speaker system to the 
student body to watch and "gel 
behind" a classmate up for judging 
that week. Interest among high 
schools is an area Cheramy and the 
agency will stimulate next year, along 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



with in-store merchandising. Ease of 
extracting proof of purchase is also 
in the plans. 

Reasons that Cheramy will repeat 
its tv beauty contest next spring are 
outlined 1>\ Cheramy sales manager 
Bert Georgi : 

• -19 1.000 votes were cast i one- 
half of these were accounted for by 
proof of purchase; meaning roughly 
10.000. considering each cap or liner 
was worth 25 votes I . Boston, for ex- 
ample, racked up 16,000 votes the 
first week. 

• New accounts were opened in 
many areas; in others, wholesaler 
interest was quickened. Examples: 
(1) rack jobbers reported selling 
twice as much merchandise in May 
as any other month, 1 2 1 a three- 
month supply of deodorant talc by 
normal standards lasted one rack 
jobber but five days. 

• Retail drug interest — a difficult 
area for the toiletries manufacturer 
because of lack of display space, self- 
service and other convenience factors 
— was perked up. Several wholesalers 
mentioned increased business coming 
from the druggist's "want book" 
rather than their own special sales 
effort. In other words, with all the 
drawbacks of drugstore selling, drug- 
gists were running out. 

That the tv campaign was a defi- 
nite stimulus over past efforts is at- 
tested to by toiletry merchandize! 
Irving Feldman. president of Zelart 
Drug Co. in Long Island. "Interest 
spread like wildfire through the nor- 
mally tough supermarket and chain 
buyers." Feldman told sponsor. 

A suspenseful moment occurred in 
Tulsa where Cheramy found it- '"Mi- 
April Showers." Chief prize, a Ram- 
bler Metropolitan, had been purchased 
from Knotts Rambler Ranch. At the 
last moment. Manager Warren Leple) 
found himself sold out and had to 
make a personal trip to Detroit to net 
the car. a "mishap" he attributes 1" 
accelerated interest in the line created 
l>\ the contest. 

A further note to the April Showers 
success storv: The winner. l(>-vear- 
old Sharon Calvert, will probably be 
featured in the contest commercials 
and merchandising next year. This 
year's contesl spokeswoman will be 
otherwise occupied. Hired b\ agency 
\.p. Tom Ellington i son of the 
agencj 's president i . professional mod- 
el Nancj Meredith became young 
Ellington's bride la>i Saturday ^ 



57 




WRAP-UP 

NEWS & IDEAS 
PICTURES 



SITTIN' ON TOP of bottle tops— exactly 
| 74,588— is Bob Waddell, host of R. C. Dance 
Parfy on WFMY-TV, Greensboro. Tops were 
votes in "Miss Royal Crown" contest 




ALABAMA'S ENTRY for "Miss Universe," 
Pat Sullivan, gets approval of Ben McKinnon 
(I), gen. mgr., WSGN, Birmingham (co-spon- 
sors of contest), Wayde Preston, star, Colt .45 




ADVERTISERS 



P&G has taken over the top mar- 
ket share in still another field: 
layercake mix. 

The P&G brand involved is Dun- 
can Hines I Compton) . The No. 2 and I 
No. 3 brands now among layercake 
mixes are Gener. 1 Mills' Betty Crock- 
er (BBDO) and Pillsbury (Burnett). 

Layercake sales represent over two- 
thirds of the flour mix business. 

The timetable for national dis- 
tribution of Philip Morris' new 
Alpine cigarettes (menthol) has 
been moved up several months 
due to the results obtained from 
the tests in Albany and Syracuse 
and Rochester. 

The brand will be backed by what 
PM calls "the heaviest tv schedule 
ever run for a new cigarette." This in- 
cluded spots and participation in the 
company's present network tv shows, 
with others added to the schedule as 
they start in the fall. 



"MISS SOUTH PACIFIC FOR 1959" (holding flowers), is joined by runners-up in contest 
staged by KINT, El Paso and RCA Victor to promote Southwest premiere of show in that city 




58 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 195!j| 



I; At this time. Philip Morris will not 
eveal the fall lineup of stations, be- 
cause, as expressed In the ad man- 
ger, "'Does Macy's tell Gimbels?" 
I Agency for Alpine: DDB. 

knottier new 'porosity paper' 
ncii I hoi cigarette on the market: 
Spring, to be introduced by P. Lor- 
Ilard this week in Philadelphia and 
'rovidence via radio and tv spots. 
kgency: L&N. 

Campaigns: 

o Jacob Ruppert Brewery and 

Herkel, Inc. have joined hands to 
nck-off a one-month beer and knock- 
\urst campaign. The theme: "Knock, 
mock for Knickerbocker and Merkel 
Miockwurst. * The campaign is high- 
ighted by a heavy advertising pro- 
gram, including 10 prime-time tv 
spots per week on WRCA-TV. WCBS- 
TV. WABC-TV and WNEW-TV, all 
n New York. The 99 radio spots per 
>veek are featured on WOR, New 
Sfork; WHLI. Hempstead: WRIV, 



Riverhead and WTAC, Patchogue, 
L. I. 

• General Mills will introduce its 
Bett> Crocker Instant Mashed Pota- 
toes nationally this week. Plans call 
for a heavy schedule of daytime and 
nighttime tv spots, to run through 
October. 

• FM sales: RCA Victor lout of 
Grey), to promote its new Van Cli- 
burn record release, has purchased a 
heavy schedule of spots on WFLN, 
Philadelphia; WASH. Washington; 
WLDM, Detroit and KFSR, San 
Francisco. 

Strictly personnel: Leonard Col- 
son, named advertising director of 
Pharma-Craft Corp. . . . Thomas 
Dillon, v.p. and treasurer of BBDO. 
elected to the board of directors of 
Advertising Research Foundation . . . 
Kudo: I. L. ""Ike" Eskenasy, execu- 
tive v.p. of Lestoil. cited for outstand- 
ing achievements in the merchandis- 
ing field by the Merchandising Execu- 
tives Club. 



AGENCIES 



Lennen & Newell, apparently im- 
pressed by the share that a Dick 
(Hark special got recently, has 
prevailed upon Lorillard to spot 
his World of Talent show in the 
ABC TV Sunday 10:30-11 period 
this fall. 

That will make four successive pro- 
grams on ABC that night with ciga- 
rette sponsors. The other three and 
sponsors: Lawman, R. J. Reynolds; 
The Rebel, L&M; The Alaskans, 
L&M. 

World of Talent had previously 
been set for Wednesday 8-8:30 p.m. 
(Because of the switch ABC is think- 
ing of putting a live show in the Wed- 
nesday 7:30-8:30 p.m. span. I 

Agency appointments: Midas Muf- 
fler Co., to Edward H. Weiss & 

Co., Chicago . . . Pharmaco, Inc. for 
three of its proprietary drug prod- 
ucts, from Ellington & Co. to Brown 
& Butcher . . . E. C. DeWitt & Co.. 



POSTERS FOR RADIO are new sales fool 
for KNX, LA. Taking look-see are (I to r) 
Jim Wechler, Myer Print Shop; Phil Hillman, 
KNX; Ralph Abell, Heintz & Company; Jim 
Donohoe of Pacific Outdoor Advertising 




FIRST IN THE D.J. DERBY, Stan Nelson 
(r), of WCPO, Cincinnati, receives congratu- 
lations from Bill Dawes, program director. 
Contest competitors were d.j.'s from the area 




THE BRIGHTEST -THEHAPPIEST 

J' fiRSIC 

H ows^' serv ice 

WCPO 

ILOR RADIO 1230 

m 




HIS NAME IN LIGHTS: That's the prize David 
Madsen won in contest staged by KOIL, Omaha. Here 
he is presented with an additional bonus from Steve 
Shepard, station manager — a season's pass to theater 



HERCULES AND THE D.J.'S is Bostons of- 
fer at this Hollywood-type premiere of new 
movie. Displaying "added attraction" poster 
are WBZ d.j.'s. Short was film about them 




59 



T 



proprietary drug manufacturer bill- 
ing $200,000, from Bryan Houston to 
Tatham-Laird . . . Roberts Dairy 
Co.. Omaha, billing $350-400,000, to 
Buchanan-Thomas, Omaha . . . 
Corinthian Broadcasting Corp., to 
Henry J. Kaufman & Associates, 
Washington, D. C. . . . American Car 
& Foundry division of ACF Indus- 
tries, from Hicks & Greist to Charles 
W. Hoyt Co. . . . Independent Avo- 
cado Growers & Shippers of Cali- 
fornia, billing $125,000. to Arm- 
strong, Fenton & Vinson, San 
Diego . . . Dot Records to Wade Ad- 
vertising, Los Angeles . . . Schick 
Safety Razor Co.. for a new product 
it will introduce in the East, to Rob- 
inson, Jensen, Fenwick & Haynes, 
Los Angeles. 

Name change: Smalley, Levitt & 
Smith, Los Angeles, becomes the 
Charles Levitt Co. with the with- 
drawal of Jack Smalley from the 
agency. 

Thisa 'n' data: Jobs Unlimited, ad- 
vertising personnel service, has bought 
out the 39-year old Walter Lowen 
Placement Agency . . . Anniversary 
note: Edward Kahn, v.p. of the Vic- 
tor A. Bennett Co., New York, pre- 
sented with a set of golf clubs to 
mark his 10th year with the agency. 

On the personnel front: Royall 
Smith, to a v.p. and creative group 
head of Lennen & Newell . . . Rich- 
ard Hall, elected president of Jack- 
son, Haerr, Peterson & Hall. Jeffer- 
son City, Mo. . . . Donald Carter 
and Donald Devor, to v.p.'s of Wil- 
liam Esty . . . John Petrie, to v.p. 
heading the media department at 
William Hart Adler, Chicago . . . 
Ross Legler, F. Michael Carroll 
and Maurice Sculfort, to v.p.'s at 
Compton . . . Herbert Kuscher, 
new marketing and sales development 
director of Kameny Associates, New 
York . . . Fred Lida, Edward Hunt 
and Lee Zahorik, to the copy de- 
partment of SSC&B . . . Robert 
Nemcik and Larry Larson, to the 
farm group copy staff at Aubrey, Fin- 
lav. Marlev & Hodgson. Chicago. 



EQUIPMENT 



Ampex received, this week, an 
order from the National Educa- 
tional Tv and Radio Center, New 



York, for $2.5 million of Video- 
tape Tv Recorders for 43 U. S. 
educational tv centers. 

According to Ampex, this is the 
largest single order for Videotape 
recorders the company has received 
to date. 

Deliveries to the 43 stations will 
start next week, with production ex- 
pected to be finished by October. 

New innovations and develop- 
ments should lead the tv and 
radio industry to greatly-in- 
creased sales during the second 
half, 1959, according to Jack 
Beldon, v.p. and gen. mgr., RCA 
Victor Home Instruments. 

Some of the developments Beldon 
cited at the International Home Fur- 
nishings Market in Chicago last week: 

"Tv sets that automatically play 
a pre-selected 12 hours of program- 
ing; tv set that converts into a living- 
room table, and vastly improved re- 
mote control tv — both in color and 
black and white." 

Another development at RCA: 

The Electron Tube Division intro- 
duced a new tv camera tube for "high 
quality performance" in color and 
black-and-white tv cameras. 

This RCA-7513 features precision 
construction and includes accurate 
alignment of each section of the tube 
with respect to the tube axis and 
maintenance of a high degree of uni- 
formity for the location of all elec- 
trodes and interelectrode spacings. 

Because of the precision construc- 
tion, the three images produced with- 
in a color camera are practically iden- 
tical in geometry. 

V 

Appointment: Ampex Corp., as 

sole authorized U.S. distributor of 
Marconi tv cameras, tv equipment 
and broadcasting equipment. 

New addition: At KETV, Omaha, 
an automatic video gain control am- 
plifier — built and installed by the sta- 
tion's engineering staff. Purpose: to 
maintain automatically uniform clari- 
ty and brightness of the tv picture. 

Personnel note: George Hagerty, 

engineering manager for Westing- 
house Broadcasting, elected chairman 
of the Institute of Radio Engineers' 
Professional Group on Broadcasting. 



FILM 



The syndication arm of all thre 
tv networks took a closer look a 
international business last week 
and each found a cause for opt 
mism as to world outlook. 
Here's what happened: 

• ABC Films reported it is noi 
represented in every tv market in th| 
world by virtue of its recent repri! 
sentation agreements with Merrnal 
Entertainments for Australia, Le 
Lax in Europe, TV Inter-American 
in Latin America and Kane Lynii 
Edward Romero in the Far East. 

• CBS Films found a 2W < in 
crease in its over-all 1959 foreig 
business as likely compared to 195 
grosses. 

• CNP I NBC Films) pointed | 
Canada where it accomplished a 65' 
increase in business through Jui 
over last year. CNP is represented 1 
Fremantle of Canada. 






Programing: MGM-TV will off 
Thin Man reruns (72 episodes! as il 
first syndication property. 

Consolidation: Guild Films ar! 
Vic Tanny gymnasiums ha 

merged and will operate under tlj 
collective name of Vic Tanny Entc 
prises. Guild has been active in 
tering tv product and Tanny has be< 
a large spot user. John Cole rernai 
head of the tv and film operation. 

Sales: MCA's Shotgun Slade h 
been signed to Jax Beer through Fi 1 
gerald Advertising of New Orlea 
for 19 markets in Louisiana, Tex; 
Oklahoma and Alabama; other net 
sponsors of the show are R. J. Re 
nolds via Wm. Esty, Holsum Bakeri 
in all Arizona markets, Schoenli 
Brewing in Dayton, Ohio and Dor 
van Coffee in Alabama market 
among 25 stations reported as buy*' 
of the show are WGN-TV. Chica> 
and KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh . . 
KCOP-TV, Los Angeles, has pi- 
chased Trans-Lux TV's Encyclopeci 
Britannica library . . . CNP's Bad'. 
714 to KNTV, San Jose; KTNT-T, 
Tacoma; WMAR-TV, Baltimor 
WSJS-TV, Winston-Salem; WJX, 
Jacksonville; WEAT-TV, West Pai 
Beach; KVOA-TV, Tucson; KCM- 
TV, Texarkana; WDMJ-TV. M- 
quette; WHEC-TV, Rocheste: 






60 



SPONSOR 



25 july 19) 



HrllO-TV, Da> ton, and WFMJ-TV, 

pungstown. 

ideo-tape note: Officials of two 

rvice companies, Mark Armistead 

ill (den Glenn, visited WBTVs color 
I c facilities in Charlotte to consider 
rising into a new company to be 
■ nipped with video-tape van? which 
>uld serve the West Coast. WBTV 
is the onl) two-unit color-tape oper- 
ion in the country and is at present 
ie only broadcaster other than NBC- 
V usiriii RCA equipment. 

ore sales: WPIX reports its car- 
on-plus-live series Three Stooges 
in house with Officer Joe Bolton is 
dd out with latest buyers General 
»j \ ia Webb Associates, Miles Labs 
a \\ ade Advertising, Maypo through 
etcher Richards. Calkins and Hol- 
•n. Bosco through Donahue and 
oe, Colgate-Palmolive via Ted Bates 
nd V. LaRosa through Hicks and 
reist . . . MCA's Paramount features 
, WTRF-TV, Wheeling, and KCMO- 
\ . Kansas City. 

ommercials : Music Makers reports 
impletion of pre-scoring for General 
oods Tapioca commercials to be 
lined by Elliot, Unger & Elliot. 

Ldditional sales: ITC's Brave Stol- 
on to Drake Bakeries through 
,oung & Rubicam and Chunkie Choc- 
,late through Grey on WPIX, New 
ork . . . WPIX's syndicated Russian 
'evolution and/or Cold War-Berlin 
risis sold to the following local ad- 
ertisers: Great Western Savings 
,!ank on KTTV, Los Angeles; Greater 
liami Federal Savings and Loan 
Lsan., WTVJ; Plasterer's Institute, 
irst Federal Builders and Domestic 
Iotors (Studebaker) on WGN-TV. 
i-hicago; Calso gas and Boston Globe 
\u WBZ-TV. Boston; American Beer 
[n WJZ-TV, Baltimore; Milwaukee 
fcas Co. on WXIX and WITI; Twin 
Cities Federal Savings on WTCN. 
Milwaukee; Pilot Life on WFMY-TV. 
Greensboro and WBTV, Charlotte; 
i^ldsmobile and Volkswagen dealers 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



SPONSOR • 25 JULY 1959 



on WTVT, Tampa; Savarin Coffee 
on WPIX, New York . . . Additional- 
ly, WBAL-TV, Baltimore, reports 
purchase of Secret Life of Adolph 
Hitler, another WPIX documentary. 

Further sales : UAA reports sales in 
14 different categories of motion pic- 
ture product in the past two weeks, 
ranging cartoons to feature film li- 
braries. Stations involved in the pur- 
chases are KGUN-TV, Tucson; 
WSOC-TV, Charlotte; WRVA-TV, 
Richmond; WITN, Washington, N. 
C; WSPD-TV. Toledo; WJTV. Jack- 
son; KETV, Omaha; WTVT, Tampa; 
WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge; WLBZ- 
TV, Bangor; WDBJ-TV. Roanoke; 
WCTV, Tallahassee; WSJV-TV, Elk- 
hart; KGBT-TV, Harlingen; KBTV, 
Denver; WCIA-TV. Champaign; 
WTVR, Richmond; KVKM-TV. Mon- 
ahans; WJAR-TV. Providence; 
CBLT-TV, Toronto; CHCH-TV. 
Hamilton; CKSO-TV. Sudbury; 
CBMT-TV. Montreal; CFQC-TV. Sas- 
katoon; CBUT-TV, Vancouver; 
PGTV, Prince George; KHTV, Port- 
land. Ore.: WSPA-TV. Spartanburg; 
WANE-TV, Fort Wayne; WFRV-TV. 
Green Bay; WHDH-TV. Boston: 



KCRA-TV. Sacramento; WTIC-TV, 
Hartford; WXEX-TV, Richmond, 
and KRTV. Great Falls. 

Strictly personnel: Jerry Kirby 

named northeastern sales manager 
for Ziv ... J. Kemi Crasto will rep- 
resent NTA international in the Far 
East and Near East . . . Jerry Fran- 
ken named public relations director 
for NTA. 



NETWORKS 



Chevrolet was the leading brand 
advertised on network tv during 
May, with gross time billings at 
$796,534, according to TvB. 

Gross time billings for the three 
t\ networl s in May rose to $52.1 mil- 
lion compared with $48 million for 
the like month in '58, while January- 
May billings registered $261 million 
over $239 million in Jan-May, '58. 

Following, the TvB list of estimated 
expenditures of the top 15 network 
brand advertisers and the top 15 net- 
work company advertisers for Ma\. 
1959 (based on LNA-BAR gross time 
costs figures) : 



«t 



mibthmMd'' 



Miss Carolyn Melton of Cheraw, S. "C, ex- 
emplifies southern charm by winning runner- 
up honors in the 1959 Miss Universe contest 
held at nearby Myrtle Beach. 

South Carolina's more that 2 I 3 million 
citizens cannot possibly be covered by the 
first TV market stations alone. WBTW offers 
you cosy access to South Carolina's second 
socioble million largely free from effective 
competition. Check NCS #3 totals for South 
Carolina TV stations. One good look ond 
you'll ogree "Second Can Be Beautiful ." 




Serving South Carolina's SECOND Biggest TV Market 



UUBTUU 

FLORENCE, S.C 



LJwm j ^Xmto^Jv 



I 214.600 
C 193.480 
D 179,600 






THE JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY represented nationally by CBS TV Spot Soles 



61 



RANK BRAND 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 

6. 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 



Chevrolet 

Kent 

Anacin 

Colgate 

Tide 

Camel 

Gleem 

Ford 

Bulova 

Phillies Cigars 

L&M Filter 

Dodge 

Dristan 



GROSS TIME COSTS 

$796,534 
762,687 
752,526 
681,848 
625,530 
581,432 
562.820 
546.164 
532,489 
523,894 
448,809 
442,608 
440.608 



14. 
15. 



Winston 
Handy Andy 



434,895 
429.290 



RANK COMPANY GROSS TIME COSTS 



1. 
2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



9. 
10. 
11. 



P&G 
Lever 
Colgate 

American Home 
General Motors 
General Foods 
R. J. Reynolds 
P. Lorillard 
General Mills 
Gillette 
Sterling Drua; 



$4,561,339 
2,687,803 
2,073,064 
2,053,041 
1,795.471 
1,550,306 
1,345.421 
1,166,647 
1,159,254 
1.089,766 
1.081.615 



. . and 



WOC -TV 



FOR BEST 
COVERAGE 
IN THE 

NATION'S 47th 
TV MARKET 



(Davenport, Iowa — Rock Island — Moline, Illinois) 

The Largest Market between Chicago and 
Omaha . . . Minneapolis and St. Louis . . . 
the 47th TV market in the nation. 




Population 
1958 1959 



Effective Buying Income 4 
1958 1959 



1,599,500 



1,632,100 



Increase — 32,600 



$2,668,806,000 

$2,879,387,000 
Increase — $210,551,000 



TV Homes 



Retail Sales' 



422,800 

Increase - 


- 15,680 


438,480 



$1,918,167,000 



Increase 



$2,042,037,000 
$123,870,000 



w 


Col. B. J. Palmer 
President 

Ernest C Sanders 


^^^™ ^^^ 


Resident Manager 
Pa* Shaffer 

Sales Manager 

Petets. Griffin, Woodward, 
Inc., Exclusive National 
Reptesentatives 


THE QUINT CITIES 

DAVENPORT , 
BETTENDORF 1 

ROCK ISLAND j 
MOLINE > ILh. 
EAST MOLINE ' 


channel 



'Sales Management's "Survey of Buying Power — 1959" 



WOC-TV is No. 1 in the 
nation's 47th TV market — lead- 
ing in TV homes (438,480), 
monthly coverage and weekly 
circulation — day and night — 
as reported in the Nielson 
Coverage Service No. 3, Spring, 
1958. For further facts and lat- 
est availabilities, call your PGW 
Colonel . . . NOW! 




WOC-TV Davenport, Iowa is part of Central 
Broadcasting Co., which also owns and operates 
•"HO-TV and WHO Radio, Des Moines, Iowa 



12. Liggett & Myers 1,043,190 

13. Chrysler 911,640 

14. Bristol Myers 906,453 

15. American Tobacco 885.243 

Network tv sales: The National 
Academy of Recording Arts and Sci- 
ences will follow the Oscar and Em- 
my awards via award-winning cere- 
monies for 10 categories, on NBC 
TV, Sunday, 29 November, 8-9 p.m., 
for the Watchmakers of Switzer- 
land (C&Wl . . . NBC News De- 
partment will survey problems cur- 
rently facing the nation's schools via 
a Back To School special on Tuesday, 
25 August. 8-9 p.m. for the type- 
writer division of Remington-Rand 
(Coniptonl . . . Fred Astaire, 14 
Emmy-awards winner for his per- 
formance on NBC TV last season, 
will star in a live musical Wednesday, 
4 November. 9-10 p.m. on NBC TV 
for Chrysler Corn. . . . Grocery 
Products division of Armour & Co. 
(FC&B) will participate in four ABC 
TV shows next season: Cheyenne, 
Adventures In Paradise, The Un 
touchables and The Alaskans ... It 
was Turns that gave an ABC-TV 
salesman a $1 million order on the 
back of an American Airlines enve' 
lope on a plane — and not American 
Airlines as notel in a previous issue. 

Thisa 'n' data: Late-night tv star,) 
Jack Paar, celebrates the secondl 
year of his NBC TV show this week 
. . . Name change: Hotel de Paree, 
western slated on CBS TV next seaH 
son, to Sundance . . . NBC Radio's 
Monitor toured the Mogen David 
Wine Corp.'s winery in Chicago last 
week, airina. the show from the spon- 
sor's plant. 

Promotion: CBS TV is sending tc 
agencies large prints depicting fa- 
mous people uttering their thoughts 
on Women to promote the network's 
hour-long daytime broadcasts dubbed 
Women. 

People on the move: Frederick 
Pierce, to manager of research foil 
ABC TV . . . Julian Goodman, di 



negro radio for 
metro new york 



62 



SPONSOR 



25 july 195" 



isector (il news and public affairs and 
Elmer Lower, manager of news in 
Washington. NBC . . . Edgar Sbel- 
ton Jr., assistant to the president for 
national affairs and Joseph Jacobs, 
tesistant to the president for legal and 
hroadcasting division affairs. AB-PT 
. . Aaron Bournstein, regional 
sales head, headquartered in Salt 
Lake City, for Intermountain Net- 
work. 



RADIO STATIONS 



WRCA, New York, is introducing 
what it calls a "new, easy-to-listen- 
to" concept : 'Wall-lo-WalF music. 

Here's how the term is defined: 
personalities will play only records 
that have a rich, full-dimensional 
sound. The\ will not plav any small 
comho. tinkling piano, or the like. 

The stations evening newscasting 
will also be revamped, with Ken Bang- 
hart functioning as an "editor-in- 
chief" or a combination coordinator- 
aewscaster. 

Ideas at work: 

• Fun in the studio: WLLY, 

Richmond. Va. is airing a series of 
gag promotions, offering listeners un- 
usual items. The first of these: rail- 
road ties. Current promotion is for a 
""Febel Vetzer" — a product not vet 
invented, but with capabilities of do- 
ing anything. Station reports dozens 
of orders now pouring into the studio. 

• Sponsors on WSAZ, Hunting- 
ton. W. Va. are giving awav money — 
that is. what the station dubs as "hap- 
py monev." The idea: with each pur- 
chase, the customer of a participating 
business receives the like amount of 
his expenditure in "happy money." 
The four-week promotion ends 15 
August, when WSAZ will hold a "hap- 
py da\s auction" in a local theater 
where people receiving the "money" 
can bid for merchandise. 

• Saluting the movies: KWK, 
St. Louis begins a "Movie Musical 
Salute" project this week. The ideas: 
(\) highlighting, via special pro- 
graming, music from pictures from 
1928 to the present; (2) musical sa- 
lutes to the movies every half-hour 
for two weeks; (3) 60-second film 
trailer to be shown on every theater 
screen thru 15 August: (4l lobby dis- 
play s in every theater (furnished by 
^\\ K i during the same period: (5) 
displays in record retailers, and (6) 



on-the-air promotions ami newspaper 
ads. 

• The buried bride: WQAM, 

Miami, arranged for a newly -wedded 
couple to spend a two-week honey- 
moon in a bomb-proof shelter as an 
experiment in connection with civil 
defense. Upon completion of the ex- 
periment, station will send the pair 
to Jamaica for an all-expense paid 
honeymoon. 

• On hand to welcome in the 
49th state: KPHO, Phoenix, went 
to Alaska to tape a 12-hour program 
of the Admission Day activities. High- 
light of the show was a live 70-minute 
broadcast from Juneau, describing 
the raising of the 49-star flag. 

Increasing their networks: Inter- 
mountain Network has added these 
four stations as affiliates: KEXO. 
Grand Junction and KLVC. Leadville. 
Col.; KXXL, Bozeman, Mont., and 
KOBH. Hot Springs, S. D. . . . The 
QXR Network is entering Massachu- 
setts for the first time via the addition 
of WTAG-FM. Worcester. 

Station purchase: Burt Harris & 
Associates, KSPR, Casper, Wyo., 
from Donald Hathawa- . for $149,982. 
Broker: Hamilton-Landis & Associ- 
ates. 

Thisa 'n' data: RAB is launching 
a new sales campaign aimed at the 
$33 billion supermarket industry, in- 
cluding sales tools for member sta- 
tions containing presentations, case 
histories, sales ideas and the like . . . 
RTES will start its 1959-60 Time 
Buying & Selling Seminars at the Ho- 
tel Lexington in New ^ ork 10 No\ em- 
ber this year . . . KCMO-FM. Kan- 
sas City, has filed application to in- 
crease its antenna height and power 
from 56.000 watts to 65.000 watts 
ERP . . . WOV, New York, and Asso- 
ciate Grocers of Harlem are set for 
mutual promotions, with station s 
symbol "Wovbug" on display in all 
AGH stores, and the latter broadcast- 
ing on the station. 

About personnel: Eugene Weil, 

v.p. and general manager. Tuschman 
Broadcasting Corp. iWABQ. Cleve- 
land I . . . Harry Sullivan, sales 
manager. WENO, Nashville . . . 
James Doyle, sales manager. Yy LL\ . 
Richmond . . . Donald Stanley, lo- 



) SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



< al sali- manager. \\ DBJ. Roanoke 
. . . Judy Mischel, sales service 
manager, Good Music Broadcasters, 
\ew York . . . Cbett Carmichael, 

promotion manager. \\ DAS, Phila- 
delphia . . . Jack Lantry. director of 
promotion and p.r., KXLY, Spokane 
. . . Freeman Hover, director of 
station promotion. KEYZ, Williston, 
YD.... Kay \rmand has resigned 
as executive v.p. of Continental 
Broadcasters to purchase a station in 
the far west. Replacing him: Col. 
George Aubrey (rump. 

Add to new personnel appoint- 
ments: Parker Daggett, sales mgr. 
WRIT. Milwaukee . . . Julius Talton, 
local sales mgr. W \P1. Birmingham 
...Bennett Scott, gen. sales mgr.. 
\\ i\I). Chicago . . . Anthony Bello, 
sales mgr. KMOX, St. Louis . . . Nick 
Pagliara, v.p. in charge of sales, 
KADY. St. Charles. Mo. ... Joe 
Moffatt, news director. Ed Thomas, 
assistant news director and Sid 
Shaw, neyvs staff of WSLS, Roanoke 
. . . Ed Winton, assistant to the 
president and chairman of the board, 
Connie B. Gav Enterprises, Washing- 
ton. D. C. . . . Cal Perley. \ ice presi- 
dent in charge of all Kenyon Brown 
radio stations . . . Kelly Wofford. 
mgr.. KITE. San Antonio. Texas . . . 
Robert F. Nims, mgr.. WNEB, Wor- 
cester, Mass. . . . Earl F. Reilly. Jr.. 
mgr., KING. Seattle. Wash. 



TV STATIONS 



During 1958. I.D.'s accounted 
for 11.1% of the total dollars 
spent in spot tv. according to 
TvB figures. 

The amount: $56,825 million out 
of $511.77 million spent in spot t\ 
during 1958. 

The comparison : 
# COMPANIES 

SPENDING I.D. 

OVER BILL- 1\- 

YEAR $50,000 (NGS I REAS1 

1956 155 $46,806,000 

1957 159 18,856,000 1.1', 
L958 189 56,825,000 \ lo..V, 

WSFA-TY. Montgomery, Via., 
has been sold by WKY Tele- 
vision System. Inc.. for 82. 5 mil- 
lion to tbe Broadcasting Com- 
pany of the South. 
The BCS also operates WIS-TV, 



63 



Columbia. S. C. and WIST, Char- 
lotte. G. Richard Shafto as executive 
v.p. executed the contract for BCS. 
Carter Hardwick continues as general 
manager for WSFA-TV. 

Insurance companies are upping 
their tv budgets at a greater rate 
than the average for other classi- 
fications in tv, according to TvB. 

The figures, for the first five 
months. 1959: 

• In network tv, gross time expen- 
ditures for insurance companies to- 
taled $4.5 million — an increase of 
48 '( over the like period last year. 

• In spot tv, gross time expendi- 
tures were $786.000 — a 22% increase 
over the first quarter 1958. 

Leading spot advertisers included 
Associated Hospital Service & United 
Medical Service, National Assn. of 
Insurance Agents, Equitable Life. Mu- 
tual of Omaha. State Farm Mutual 
Auto Ins. and National Life & Acci- 
dent Ins. Co. 

Prudential was the leading network 
tv insurance company, with gross 
billings at $1.6 million, followed by 
Mutual of Omaha with billings at 
$1 million. 



Ray Ellingsen 



HOTOGRAPHY 



can give 

your 

photographic needs 

the kind of 

attention 

you like 

. . . backed by 

experience 

and artistry! 

Simply call 
DEIaware 7-7249 

or wrife to 

12 E. Grand Ave. 

Chicago 



NAB's Tv Information Commit- 
tee expects its newly-created Tv 
Information Organization staffed 
and operated by 1 October. 

I TIO is being formed to conduct 
an industrywide campaign ballyhoo- 
ing tv's contribution to American 
life.) 

At its meeting in New York last 
week, the Committee: 

• Received contributions from the 
tv networks totaling $195,000 for the 
first year's operation. The individual 
breakdown: ABC, $45,000; CBS, 
$75,000 and NBC, $75,000. 

• Set up three subcommittees ■ — 
program, structure and personnel. 

• Approved sending pledge forms 
to tv stations asking annual contribu- 
tions of four-times a station's highest 
quarter-hour rates to become spon- 
sors of TIO. 

Members of the pro tern Commit- 
tee at the meeting included: Clair Mc- 
Collough. Steinman Stations; C. 
Wrede Petersmeyer, Corinthian: Wil- 
lard Walbridge, KTRK-TV. Houston; 
John Hayes, Washington Post Broad- 
cast Division; Michael Foster, ABC; 
Charles Steinberg, CBS and Kenneth 
Bilbv, NBC. 

Programing notes: KTTV, Los 

Angeles, debuted what it terms "a 
unique show" last week. Dubbed 
Cavalcade of Spots, the show is made 
up of the best and most creative an- 
nouncements from England, Italy, 
France. Belgium. Japan and the U.S. 
. . . KFMB-TV, San Diego, has 
joined the local specials parade via its 
one-hour prime time spectacular the 
other week. The show starred Andre 
Previn in a one-man tv routine. 

Thisa V data: WVEC-TV, uhf'er 
in Norfolk, Va., has been awarded the 
grant for vhf Channel 13 in that mar- 
ket .. . Beginning this fall, KMSP- 
TV, Minneapolis-St. Paul, will carry 
four one-half hour ABC TV p.m. 
shows . . . Kudo: WNEM-TV, Flint, 
Mich., cited by the Mayor of Bay 
City for its The Seachest children's 
program. 

Strictly personnel: William Zim- 
merman, to local sales manager, 
WTVN-TV, Columbus. 0. . . . Mi- 
chael Cary, to director of continuity, 
WNTA-TV-AM-FM, Newark, N. J. 
. . . James Henneberry, director of 
promotion, KPLR-TV, St. Louis. 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Edwin Medcalfe, v.p. in charge 
of Weed Tv Corp.'s West Coast 
offices, moves to New York next 
week as the newly-created na- 
tional sales manager. 

His position: directing sales in 
nine Weed offices and assisting in the 
formulation of plans and policy in 
Weed's research, marketing and man- 
agement services department. 

Rep appointments: KHFI, Austin, 
to Good Music Broadcasters, New 
York . . . KZIX, Ft. Collins, to 
B-N-B, Inc., Time Sales as West 

Coast reps. 

On the personnel front : Larry 
Gentile, general manager of the new 
Detroit office of Forjoe & Co. . . . 
Mark Hanlon, to Ohio Stations 
Reps in Cleveland as assistant general 
manager . . . John Francis, to the 
sales department of CBS Radio Spot 
Sales . . . Forrester Johnson, ac- 
count exec, PGW, Hollywood. ^ 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 47) 

creative purpose. No good visual 
effect is merely photographic. That 
is why art directors go to such tre- 
mendous effort to achieve unusual 
effects. 

And I doubt very much if any ad- 
vertising agency is willing to sacrifice 
the creative theme of its advertising 
to satisfy the financial end. 

Eventually both of these ends will 
be achieved, and I feel that they will 
be achieved when the best combined 
qualities of film and video tape are 
merged for the ultimate in visual 
creation. 

William Miesegaes, pres., Transfilm 
Inc., New York 
The only "conflict" between film 
and tape exists in the minds of those 
who may not fully understand the 
techniques and functions of each 
medium. They presuppose that be- 
cause both systems record visual im- 
ages they are completely interchange- 
able. Today, this is not true. How- 
ever, when tape production techniques 
are more highly developed a greater 
degree of interchangeability will exist. 



64 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 




Tape offers decided advantages 
over film in the recording of live tele- 
casts for delayed or repeat broad- 
casts. But, as a substitute for com- 
mercials ordinarily destined for film, 
tape must contend with other factors 
which might preclude its use or, at 
the very least, bring tape costs and 
production time up to those of film. 



Tape and film 
ivill be used 
side-by-side 
as need 

dictates 



Two important differences in cur- 
rent tape and film production tech- 
niques exist in lighting and direction. 
With tape, using multiple tv cameras 
to shoot a commercial in a continuous 
run-through necessitates "flat" light- 
ing, which permits minimal control. 
I All too often this lighting is very 
cruel to actors. I Continuous run- 
through also limits direction and puts 
a greater burden on the performers. 
The proponents of tape frequently 
praise this lack of detailed direction 
for the "spontaneity" it offers. This 
in a single telecast, like a live com- 
mercial, can be appealing. However, 
I cannot see the logic in repeated air- 
ings of "spontaneous'" actions, as 
spontaneity and repetition are psycho- 
logically antipathetic. Further, the 
client must approve his commercial 
"Johnny-on-the-spot.'" 

Motion pictures, on the other hand, 
are shot scene-by-scene permitting 
maximum lighting control and direc- 
tion. Image "modeling" — the place- 
ment of dimensional lighting — shows 
off both actor and product at their 
very best. 

Under the current system of pro- 
duction tape is quick and perhaps less 
expensive than film. Relatively 
speaking (hours vs. days!, speed has 
rarely been a factor in the making of 
commercials. It is highly doubtful 
that economy alone will rule agencv 
thinking. The investment in tv com- 
mercials is. h\ far. the least of the 
charges involved in tv advertising 
r. . yet it is certainly the most im- 
portant. 

But. handled like film, i.e., scene- 
by-scene lighting and single camera 
shooting, the quality of the tape im- 



age can he excellent, and the story- 
telling greatly sharpened by maxi- 
mum direction. This method, how- 
ever, must bring the cost and time 
element of tape production into line 
with film. 

Another important consideration is 
the traffic in a saturation tv spot cam- 
paign. Even if quantity dupes of the 
original taped commercial could be 
reproduced at reasonable cost and 
played by every tv station, the bulk 
alone of a tape shipment would be 
overwhelming and the costs prohibi- 



tive. A one-minute I Omm film print 
can practically be mailed in an enve- 
lope. Kinescopes would seem to be 
the only answer. But. wh. use tape 
in the first place if kines will ulti- 
mately be used? 

The answer here may well be that 
both film and tape will be used side- 
by-side as the need dictates. And, as 
I believe that the production tech- 
niques for tape ultimatelv will be 
similar to film, it will be the experi- 
enced film-maker who will be respon- 
sible for producing it. ^ 



Ask + he man wHo gefc 9t0(Jf ^ 




• . • anywhere! 



WDBJ-TV covers 53 coun- 
ties . . . where there are over 
400,000 television homes, 
$2 billion in retail sales. You 
can buy into this rich market 
economically and effectively, 
for WDBJ-TV furnishes highly 
rated shows at comparatively 
low cost to you. 

For example, WEATHER 
SPECIAL and LATE 
EDITION at 11:00 PM 



nightly delivers viewers for 
$1.14 per M on a 5 Plan; 90 
cents on a 10 Plan.* This 
receptive audience is almost 
totally adult. Powerful sales- 
producing merchandising 
support provided, too! 

It will pay you to take a 
closer look at WEATHER 
SPECIAL and LATE 
EDITION and other "best 
buys" offered by WDBJ-TV. 

'all cpmj bated on March, 1959 NSl 



ASK YOUR PGW COLONEL FOR CURRENT AVAILABILITIES 




Maximum Power 



CHANNEL 

Maximum Height 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 



7 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



65 



'SPONSOR 




I inform, interpret, analyze, advise, question, compliment and 
complain. I am the heartbeat of your industry. 

As my issues tick by, I record the pulsations of your industry — 
its strengths and weaknesses, its triumphs and failures, its hopes and 
regrets. 

I live to serve. I live to serve your industry that is also mine. 

My sense of service means many things. More than just words- 
in-print to keep you posted, my sense of service also means projecting 
the significant facets of our kaleidoscopic industry in sharpest focus 
for all to see. 

It means fighting for industry advances, sometimes in the face 
of bitter opposition. 

It means providing you with fact-and-figure tools to help you 
do your job better. 

It means painting a positive picture of our industry, a picture 
so plausible that even the most carping critic cannot deny its validity. 

It means adding moral stature to our industry whether the issue 
be Code compliance, rates, or ratings. It means a personal code of 
conduct that permits me, with clean hands, to urge highest standards 
on our industry. 

I am the heartbeat of our industry. As you can see, I am also 
its conscience. 

How well I do my job only you are qualified to judge. 

I am proud to be your trade paper. I promise to serve you in 
every way at my disposal. 

I am SPONSOR. 



How well SPONSOR does its job is partially 
revealed by agency-advertiser surveys of 
reading preferences. We'll be happy to send 
you summaries of the two latest. 



• SPRINGFIELD 

• DECATUR 

• CHAMPAIGN-URBANA 

"When* Mid Am&uca 
Jdiuel and fcuyl . . . " 




TV CO-OP 

{Continued from page 43) 



Allow- 
ance 



Other 
Films material 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



IMPACT! 

mi 




SHARE OF AUDIENCE 
IN A COMPETITIVE, 
3-STATION MARKET* 

More audience than all other El 
Paso stations combined! That's 
what the latest ARB gives KROD- 
TV ('February 1959.) And that's 
why KROD-TV is the "must" buy 
to reach the vast West Texas-South- 
ern New Mexico market. 




xRoj>-!nr 

EL PASO, TEXAS 



Dorronce D. Roderick, Pres. 

Vol Lawrence, V.-Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



68 



Proctor Elec. 
Regina Corp. 
Geo. D. Roper Sales 
Roto-Broil 
Scoville Mfg. 

Hamilton-Beach Div. 
Sunbeam 
Tappan 
Waring Prod. 
Westinghouse Elec. 

Major Appliance Div. * 
Whirlpool 

Auto Accessories & Equipment 

Armstrong Rubber 
Arvin Ind. 
Clifton Mfg. 
Commercial Solvents 
Dayton Rubber 
DuPont 

Organic Chem. Dept. 
Firestone Tire & Rubber 
B. F. Goodrich 
Gould-National Batteries 
Gulf Oil 

Lee Tire & Rubber 
Midas, Inc. 
Mohawk Rubber 
Seiberling Rubber 
U.S. Rubber— Tires Div. 

Automotive 

American Motors 
Chrysler 

Chrysler Div. 

Dodge Div. 
DeSoto Div. 
Ford Motor 

Ford Div. 

M-E-L Div. 
General Motors 
Spartan Aircraft 

Mobile Homes Div. 
World-Wide Auto. 

Beer-Wine-Ale 

Ballantine 

Carling 

Falstaff 

M. K. Goetz 

National 

Peter Hand * * * 

Miller 

West End * 

Building & Construct. Materials 

Acme Steel 

Geneva Kitchens 
American Houses 
Anderson Corp. 
Butler Mfg. 
Johns-Manville Sales 
Jones & Brown 
Miller Metal Prod. 

Beautycraft Kitchens 



National Gypsum 

Asbestos Prod. 
National Homes 
Republic Steel Kitchens * 
Republic Steel Corp. 

Truscon Div. 
F. C. Russell 

Storm Windows of Alum. 
U.S. Plywood 
U.S. Steel Homes 

Confections & Soft Drinks 

E. J. Brach 
Chunky Choc. 
Coca-Cola 
Cott Beverage 
Dr. Pepper 
Charles E. Hires 
Hollywood Brands 
Royal Crown Cola 
Pepsi-Cola 
Seven-Up 
Squirt 

Drugs & Remedies 

Beltone Hearing Aid 
Block Drug 
Bristol-Myers 

Products Div. 
Campana Sales 

Carlay Co. Div. 
Dictograph Prod. 

Acousticon Div. 
Grove Labs., Inc. 
McKesson & Robbins 

McKesson Labs. Div. 
Rexall Drug 
S.S.S. Co. 
Warner Lambert Pharm. 

Co., Family Prod. Div. 
Zenith Radio 

Hearing Aid Div. 

Food Products 

America:) Kitchen 

Armour 

Atlantis Sales * 

Atmore & Son 

Blue Plate Foods, 

Bowman Biscuit 

Breast-O-Chicken Tuna 

Brooks Foods 

Burnham & Morrill Co. 

California Packing 

Chicken of the Sea 

College Inn 

Gerber 

Baby Foods Div. 
Glidden Co. 

Durkee Foods 
Green Giant 
Hawaiian Pineapple 
H. J. Heinz 

Marketing Div. 
International Milling 
Junket Brand 
Kitchens of Sara Lee 

{Please turn to page 74) 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



What's happening in U. S. Government 
that affects sponsors, agencies, stations 



WASHINGTON WEEK 



25 JULY 1959 The difficulty in getting even a Lar Daly repealer moving in Congress illu-- 

copyright 1959 trates the jitteriness with which legislators approach the equal-time question — 

sponsor so important in their own political lives. 

publications inc. Take what happened in the House Commerce Committee this week: It had been slated 

to act on the question the first of the week hut disagreements forced a postponement. 

The bill it has under consideration was more restricted than the one approved by the 
Senate Commerce Committee, which shied away from large scale changes in Sec. 315 but 
did exempt straight newscasts, panel discussions, news documentaries and panel shows. 

As for the House committee it seemed inclined to steer clear on including panel shows 
and documentaries. Some wanted to narrow 7 the measure still farther. 



FCC commissioner Rohert E. Lee has made an eloquent plea for the moving 
of all tv to uhf. 

He predicts outright that the current FCC negotiations with the military for more 
vhf space will end in failure, and says the only way to secure enough channels for all of the 
stations of the future is to move to uhf right now. 

Meanwhile, the FCC majority was moving right along in adding new vhf assignments. 
In other words, in the opposite direction. Columbus, Ga., got one. The Commission started the 
ball rolling toward adding new vhf channels to Montgomery or Birmingham, Ala., to Sacra- 
mento, San Francisco, or Reno, Xev., and to either Fresno or Bakersfield, Cai. 

Commission action on as many as 17 other major markets with fewer than 
three vhf assignments was expected before the August recess. 

The Lee dissent was delivered to the Senate Commerce Committee, which in the past 
has called for consideration of a move of all tv to uhf. However, even here the Lee dissent 
appeared to be falling on deaf ears, since many on the committee have cooled on uhf. 



Rep. Oren Harris (D., Ark.), chairman of the House Legislative Oversight sub- 
committee, told the House that the group continues to keep a sharp eye on broad- 
casting, as administered by the FCC. 

Meanwhile, the Senate Judiciary subcommittee under Sen. John Carroll I I).. Colo.) this 
week started its own probe of Federal regulatory agencies. Carroll has hinted that his group 
might eventually get into the juicy grounds already covered by Harris. The start promises to 
deal with more technical matters, however. 

Harris noted that his group is currently taken up more with speeding up the work of 
the regulatory agencies and making them more efficient. But he made it clear that the prob- 
ing eye remains on off-the-record approaches in contested cases, trafficking in li- 
censes, mergers and "pay-offs" as between competing applicants. 



The "Atlanta case"' has been closed: All stations whose licenses had been held 
up because of alleged lack of programing balance had their licenses renewed with- 
out hearings. 

This leaves the whole question of FCC authority over programing still in the categor) 
of "regulation by lifted eyebrow," to quote chairman Doerfer. None of the commission- 
ers are quite sure whether this end of the case portends greater or less FCC attention to 
station programing. 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



69 




25 JULY 1959 

Copyright 1959 

SPONSOR 

PUBLICATIONS INC 



Marketing tools, trends, news, 
in syndication and commercials 



FILM-SCOPE 



Considering the causes for optimism and gloom facing syndication at mid-sum 
mer, you might describe the field as invested with a split personality. 

This schizoid condition stems from the fact that there are more and bigger syndication 
spenders before but fewer places where they can spend their money. 

Let's take the bright side first. The regional gates have opened wide and new advertisers 
and distributors have entered the picture, creating such situations as these. 

• NEW BUYERS: Carling with CBS Films' Phil Silvers in 63 markets and Lucky 
Strike on a two-show spread, adding Ziv's That Man Dawson in 11 cities. 

• NEW SELLERS: ITC's maiden syndication entry, Four Just Men, has five deals worth 
$750,000: Schaefer beer, Standard Oil of Texas, the Crosley stations and the 40-station CBC 
line-up. UA-TV is also making a syndication debut with The Vikings. 

Another upbeat is repeat spending such as Budweiser's renewal on NTA's U. S. Marshall 
and this flock of regionals on new shows: Falstaffs Coronado 9 (MCA), D-X Sunray's Grand 
Jury (NTA), Ballantine's Shotgun Slade (MCA) and Lucky Strike's Lock-Up (Ziv). 

But there's a debit side posing such possibilities as: 

1) The newwork's recapturing more 7:30-11 p.m. option time. 

2) Syndicators trimming production in anticipation of a time shortage. 

3) On-the-fence spenders, as a consequence, shifting to announcements instead of pro 
grams rather than face troubles of clearing and holding time slots. 



70 



Les Harris is leaving a v.p. post at CBS Films to become international manag 
ing director of production for ITC. 

With 6 years in production and management at CBS Films, Harris may help to solve this 
ITC problem: How to produce tv film series in England and elsewhere abroad that will be 
acceptable to network film buyers in the U. S. 






One of the toughest problems facing established syndicated shows is the threat 
of a forced time-period switch after the show has built up a good rating. 

A study of April and June ARB reports in six major markets at 10:30 p.m. on Saturday 
indicates a 45^ average dip in ratings for reshuffled shows compared to only a 6% sum- 
mer slump for shows that remained in their time periods. 

Note how in these three markets the average ARB went down from 25.1 to 13.8: 



CITY 


SHOW 


OLD TIME SLOT 


NEW TIME SLOT 






(April ARB) 


(June ARB) 


St. Louis 


Death Valley Days 


26.8 


16.5 


New York 


Sea Hunt 


25.1 


12.8 


Philadelphia 


San Francisco Beat 


23.4 


12.1 



Now, note how in these three other markets, where there were no schedule changes, the 
average rating in June (21.3) was practically the same as April's (22.4) : 



CITY 


SHOW 


Pittsburgh 


State Trooper 


Detroit 


Sea Hunt 


Boston 


U. S. Marshall 



APRIL ARB 


JUNE ARB 


31.9 


24.4 


23.2 


21.6 


12.1 


18.0 



(Tn the chart at top, station changes resulted from network time recaptures.) 

sponsor • 25 JULY 1959 






FILM-SCOPE continued 



It took ITC's Cannonball series on trucking adventures to bring about the first 
major spending by a trucking company in tv. 

The show was purchased by Garrett Freightlines of Salt Lake City on the seven markets 
Skyline Network: KSL-TV, Salt Lake City; KBOI-TV, Boise; KID-TV, Idaho Falls; KLIX-T\ , 
Twin Falls; KSLF-TV, Butte; KFBB-TV, Great Falls and KOOK-TV, Montana. 

Garrett is one of a number of companies that normally do not use tv but have created 
special budgets at one time or another for syndicated shows devoted to their particular indus- 
try. 

Syndication will have to rely increasingly on 7 p.m. time periods this fall since 
there won't be more than five half-hours a week open after 7:30 p.m. in three-sta- 
tion markets. 

The five half-hours are: 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. on Thursdays on ABC stations, 7:30 
p.m. Tuesdays on CBS affiliates and 10:30 p.m Sundays and Tuesdays on NBC outlets. 

Feature film participation buyers can increase their reach by as much as 40' < 

to 80/^ with night-to-night rotation as compared to fixed position schedules. 

According to a Nielsen study for WBBM-TV's Evening Performance, four week coverage 
advanced from 21% to 29% for one-night a week exposure and from 25% to 45% 
with two-night exposure under the new rotation method. 



The syndicated documentary specials produced and sold by WPIX, New York, 
are apparently proving that unusual programing will create its own market. 

Automobiles, gasoline, banks, insurance, newspapers, homebuilders, foods and beers are 
among the types of sponsors that bought The Russian Revolution and the Cold War in major 
cities. (See Wrap-Up for details, p. 61.) 

In addition to the prestige element for local advertisers, shows of this type with just a 
single full-hour to buy don't involve the need for a year-round budget. 



COMMERCIALS 



Small and medium sized film producers in the commercials field are experi- 
menting with new ways of using video-tape systems and are increasingly optimistic 
on their role in tape. 

A spokesman for the Film Producers Association in New York told FILM-SCOPE: "It's 
the producer who'll find the right uses for video-tape in commercials. At the moment network 
and studio tape facilities are being used mostly to record live commercials, and not to dis- 
cover innate production possibilities." 

FPA members have invested an estimated $1.5 million on tape equipment and experimen- 
tation to date, but only three have their own facilities: Elliot. Unger & Elliot, Eilmwavs and 
Termini. 

Several tv commercials have reportedly been made on video-tape only to be 
subsequently produced on film. 

This has led to a crossfire of comment between two camps. 

Sav the film men: Tape caul capture film's quality and creativity and its better to be 
slow with film than sorry with tape. 

Say the tape men: Tape is excellent for fast delivery for network schedules and there's no 
reason why it can't be used as a rehearsal or testing device for a film commercial that will 
get a long-range spot schedule. 

sponsor • 25 julv 1959 71 




A round-up of trade talk, 
trends and tips for admen 



SPONSOR HEARS 



25 JULY 1959 There's an exciting battle for power going on in one of the big drug companies. 

copyright 1959 Spearheading one faction is the heir-apparent of a founder (who heads a division) 

sponsor anc ] a college roommate of his. 



PUBLICATIONS INC. 



NBC TV appears to be picking and choosing when it comes to putting out for 
color. 

Because of the economics of residual uses, the network has decided to limit the color 
for Riverboat to three episodes. On the other hand, it will absorb the additional costs 
for color of the Ford Tuesday night extravaganzas. 



Several stations have found out recently that P&G is pretty sensitive about how its 
name is used in promotion pieces listing it among the station's sponsors. 

In the event P&G hasn't been on the station — or merely used it for a quick test schedule 
— Cincinnati dashes off a letter to the station putting the record straight. 

Tang has become the biggest seller for any single brand in the General Foods 
family — even after changing its appeal-target in the middle of the battle. 

The powdered drink found that if it was going to get anywhere, it would have to focus 
its commercials on children — not adults. 



Here's how Alcoa and Goodyear make sure that their alternate sponsorship on 
NBC TV Monday nights never starts a hassle over who gets which script: 

Their respective agencies — Y&R and F&S&R — hold story-outline meetings and 
flip a coin for first choice. 

The producer, Screen Gems, sits in between. 

The penchant of McCann-Erickson's Marion Harper for suddenly and fre- 
quently dashing off to all points of the globe is symbolized by this gag making the 
rounds of Madison Avenue: 

Some of his account men were having lunch when one of them asked: 

"Have you seen Marion Harper lately?" 

"He flew to Europe this morning," remarked another. 

'-"*■*"-"'—-*; 

Revlon"s plan to include Schick in at least three of its 90-minute shows is 
bound to pose a touchy discount problem for CBS TV. 

The question: Is Schick entitled to benefit from the discounts accruing to Revlon, since 
the latter company owns but 20% of the Schick stock? 

NBC TV not so long ago had a similar nut to crack in the case of Whirlpool, in 
which RCA holds a 20 r < interest. 

The network's decision: not to include Whirlpool in any discounts granted RCA. 

72 sponsor • 25 .tui.y 1959 



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ELECTRONICS 




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ules into the control panel. Each module has 
illuminated symbol showing the effect it will 
produce. Slide an effect out— slide another 
in— it's just that easy. You get just the right 
effect to add that extra SELL to your pro- 
grams and commercials. 



SIMPLIFIED CONTROL- Push-buttons put effects se- 
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illuminated symbol and you are ready to go "on-air." 
Wipes and transitions are controlled by a standard 
fader lever for simple foolproof operation. 

UNLIMITED VARIETY— The complete complement of 
154 special effects includes wipes, split-screens, pic- 
ture insets, block, wedge, circular and multiple fre- 
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And get them with the least amount of effort possible. 



Ask your RCA Broadcast representative for complete information. Or write to RCA, Dept. 
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RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

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J 



My Mommy- 
Listens to KFWB 



Use Pulse. Use Hooper. Use 
Nielsen. All three rate KFWB 
#1 in total audience in the 
L.A. area. Buy KFWB . . . first 
in Los Angeles. It's the thing 
to do! 




6419 Hollywood Blvd , Hollywood 28 / HO 3-5151 
ROBERT M. PURCEIL, President and Gen Manajei 
JAMES F. SIMONS. Gen Sales Manager 
Represented nationally by JOHN BLAIR I CO. 



m 

1490 kc. 
102.7 mc. 

represented 

by 

Bernard 

Howard & Co., 

Inc. 


is the 
most 
effective 
sales force 
in the 

CHICAGO 

NEGRO 

MARKET 

with 

Chicago's Greatest 

Air Salesman 

km <Jfl 1 H * 1 1 *■ 


P ^1 BILL 
m*f HILL 



TV CO-OP 

{Continued from page 681 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Same ownership as WDIA— Memphis 



Kraft 

Larsen Co. * * 

Libby, McNeil & Libby 

Mrs. Tucker's Shortening * 

Pet Milk 

Rath Packing 

River Brand Rice Mills * 

Skinner Mfg. * 

Star-Kist 

Stokely-Van Camp * 

United Biscuit 

Keebler Biscuit Div. 
Wilson & Co. * 

Footwear 

Allen-Edmonds 

Desco 

Dunn & McCarthy 

Freeman * 

Gen. Shoe 

Fortune Div. 

Fortuner 

Jarman 
H. C. Godman 
International Shoe 

Friedman-Shelby 

Peters Branch 

Sundial 

Winthrop 
I. Miller 
A. E. Nettleton 
U.S. Rubber Co. 

Footwear-Gen. Prod. 

Furniture-Floor-Coverings- 
Wallpaper-Fabrics 

Berkline * 

Bigelow-Sanford Carpet 

Birge Co. 

Fieldcrest Mills 

Harvard Mfg. 

International Furniture 

A & M Karagheusian 

Kenmar Mfg. 

Sandura 

F. Schumacher 

Waverly Fabrics Div. * 
Scranton Lace 
Sealy 

Serta Assoc. 
Simmons 
Taylor Bedding 
Trimble 
Wunda Weve Carpet 

Gasoline-Lubricants-Fuels 

Bardahl International Oil 
Cities Service Oil 
Continental Oil 
D-X Sunray Oil 
General Petroleum 
Humble Oil & Refining 
Quaker St. Oil Refining * 
Richfield Oil Co. of N.Y. 
Shell Oil 



Sinclair Refining * 

Socony Mobil Oil * * 

South Penn Oil 

Penzoil Div. * 

Standard Oil (Ind.) * * 

Sun Oil 

Texas Co. * * 

Tidewater Oil * 

Hardware & Garden Supplies 

Burgess Vibrocrafters * * 

Clinton Engines Corp. 

Chainsaw Div. * * 

DeWalt 

Fairbanks Morse * * 

Outboard Marine 

Lawn Boy Div. * * 

Garfield Williamson * * 

Magna Power Tool * * 

Motor Wheel 

Appliance Div. * 

John Oster Mfg. 
Porter-Cable Machine * 

Whitney Seed * 

Heating-Air Conditioning- 
Plumbing 

Amer. Radiator & Standard 

Sanitary Corp. 

Air Conditioning Div. * 
Armstrong Furnace 
Borg-Warner 

York-Commercial Div. * 
Carrier 

Chattanooga Royal 
Crane 
Eureka-Williams Co. 

Williams Div. 
General Electric 

Room Air Cond. 
Lennox Industries 
A. 0. Smith 

Permaglas Div. 
U.S. Air Conditioning * * * 

Household Furnishings 

Boonton Molding 
Bridgeport Brass 

Copperware Div. 
Doeskin Products 
Idealware 

Kaiser Alum. & Chemical * 
Kirsch Co. 
Reynolds Metals 
Wear-Ever Aluminum 

Insurance 

Mutual Benefit Health & 

Accident Assoc. 
Nationwide Ins. 
State Farm Mutual 

Auto Insurance Co. 

Jewelry-Clocks-Silverware 

Ansom 

Benrus Watch 
Bulova Watch 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Columbia Diamond Rings 
Elgin National Watch 
General Electric 

Clock & Timer Dept. * 
lean R. Graef 
Jruen Watch 
Hamilton Watch 
-lelbros Watch 
acques Kreisier 
Gorman M. Morris 
>peidel 
I Wallace 

Miscellaneous 

American Can 
Jerlou Mfg. 
ohn Dritz 
Household Finance 
Niagara Therapy Mfg. 
toto-Rooter 

Music & Entertainment 

Columbia Pictures 

Decca Records 

Walt Disney Productions * 

Hardman, Peck 

Kranich & Bach 

Pacific Mercury Electric 

Thomas Organ Co. 
Sohmer * 

Universal Pictures 
Warner Brothers Pictures * 

Office Equipment & Supplies 

iversharp 
Joshua Meier 
Paper Mate 
Remington Rand 
Royal McBee 
I A. Sheaffer Pen 
Swingline 
White & Wychoff 

Paints-Varnishes-Enamels 

American Marietta 
National Chemical & Mfg. 

Luminall Paints Div. * 
National Lead 
National Gypsum 

Paint Products Div. 
O'Brien Corp. 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass 

Paint & Brush Div. * * 

Valspar Corp. * * 

Radio-Television-Electronics 

Admiral * * 

Altec Lansing 
Bell Sound System 
DeWald Radio Mfg. 
Jensen Mfg. * 

General Electric 
Radio Receiver Dept. * 



TV Receiver Dept. 
Magnavox 
Motorola 

Olympic Radio & TV 
Packard-Bell 
Philco 
Pilot Radio 
RCA Victor 

Victrola Div. 
Stromberg-Carlson 

Special Prod. Div. 
Sylvania Elec. 
Trav-ler Radio 
Westinghouse Elec. 



TV-Radio Div. 

Zenith Radio Corp. 

Radio-TV Div. 

Soaps-Cleaners-Polishes 

Adell Chemical 
Armour 

Household Soap Dept. * 
B. T. Babbitt 
Cellowax 
Calgon 
Clorox Co. 
Colgate-Palmolive 



LESTOIUS Dollar 
Buys More on WKOW-TV 



"Our saturation campaign is reinforced at the 
retail level by the merchandising support given 
us by WKOW-TV. Over fifty personal calls on 
grocers, plus a sustained flow of information 
through a merchandising letter 
has kept all our retailers in- 
formed of the sales support 
they can expect. Stocks are 
up, displays are up, shelf 
space is up, and SALES are 
up, thanks to the WKOW-TV's 
splendid support." 

Thomas F. Morissey 
Sales Representative 
Lestoil (Adell Chemical Co.) 

"Thank you, Eleanor 
Miller of Jackson Associ- 
ates, for the opportunity to 
demonstrate that your dol- 
lar buys MORE on 
WKOW-TV. And it SELLS 



more, too! : 



Ben Hovel 
General Manager 
WKOW-TV 




Li* J Oil 



WKOW 

MADISON, WISCONSIN 




SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



75 



A SIGHT TO SEE! 



KTLE 



CHANNEL 6 




..dafiDg^eu/^ 



TELEVISION STATION 



BASIC NBC 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 

FORJOE & COMPANY 

New York - Chicago - Los Angeles- Atlanta 
Son Francisco - Philadelphia 






CHECK (/and 
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WTHI-TV offers the 
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stations! 



One hundred and eleven 
national and regional 
spot advertisers know that 
the Terre Haute market is 
not covered effectively 
by outside TV. 

WTHI-TV 

CHANNEL IO • CBS — ABC 

TERRE 
HAUTE 

INDIANA 

Represented Nationally 
by Boiling Co. 




Allow- Other 

ance Films material 



Allow- Other .( 

ance Films material 



Household Prod. Div. * 
Corn Prod. Refining 
Colgate-Palmolive 

Toilet Articles Div. 
Coty 
Helene Curtis 

Lentheric Div. 

Products Div. 
Eversharp 
Max Factor 

Pharm. & Spec. Div. 
Gillette 

Johnson & Johnson 
Lehn & Fink 

Dorothy Gray, Ltd. 

Lehn & Fink Div. 
Juliette Marglen 
Pacquin 
Remington Rand 

Electric Shaver 
Revlon 

Andre Richard 
North American 

Philips Co. 
Ronson 
Warner Lambert 

Pharm. Co. 

Family Prod. Div. 

Sporting & Hobby Goods 

Arkansas Traveler Boats 

Bell & Howell 

Brunswick-Balke-Collender 

Eastman Kodak 

Enterprise Mfg. 

Evans Prod. 

General Analine & Film 

Ansco Div. 
Graflex 

Internat'l Swimming Pool 
Kiekhaefer 
Lone Star Boat 
Outboard Marine 

Evinrude Div. 

Johnson Div. 
Picture Craft * 

Polaroid 
Rawlings Sporting Goods 

Toilet Requisites 

Eliz. Arden Sales 
A. S. R. Prod 
Barbasol 
Hazel Bishop 
Chemway 

Lady Esther Div. 
Jacqueline Cochran 

Toys & Games 

American Character Doll 

Amer. Metal Specialties 

Effanbee Doll 

A. C. Gilbert 

Ideal Toy 

Lionel 

Mattel 



Remco 
Transogram 
Dif Corp. 
Glamorene 
Gold Seal 
Andrew Jergens 
Lever Bros. 

Soap Prod. Div. 
Noxon 



BBDO 

{Continued from page 33) 

board and the creative plans board 
get together and co-ordinate their 
individual efforts and the final plans 
are submitted for "top-of-the-agency" 
approval. 

As for the new associate media 
directors, any one of them can be 
called for consultation on another ac- 
count than his own. 

"We don't put any BBDO brains 
under a bushel basket just because we 
have an organizational chart," says 
Mike Donovan. Donovan, one of the 
new associate media directors came 
to BBDO from B&B about a month 
ago, is a veteran mediaman and was 
once broadcast media supervisor for 
Mc-E. 

'"The improvements in advertising 
media," he told sponsor, "are reach- 
ing a peak of sophistication. 

"To give the client the planning in 
depth which is necessary to keep up 
with these improvements, the agency 
of today must itself grow more and 
more sophisticated." 

One of the big areas of media im- 
provements is in the development of 
the media "market mix." The mar- 
keting revolution that has been in 
progress for years has been forcing 
this upon media. Spot radio and tv 
have demonstrated the importance of 
flexibility to the modern ad campaign. 
To meet the new marketing demands, 
net radio has become as flexible as a 
willow wand. "And network tv," says 
Donovan, "is becoming more flexible 
now." On the print side of the pic- 
ture, national magazines are affording 
market area mixes through split press 
runs for different regions. 

"To appreciate and take advantage 
of this local market mix," says Dono- 
van, "an agency has a growing need 
for greater depth of planning." 

The new re-organization of BBDO 
media department is that agency's 
answer to the challenge. W*\ 



76 



SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



GENCY GUYS 

Continued from page 39) 

lides and nine cuts on two transcrip- 
pns, to be rotated each with the 
>ther for a total of II spots a week, 
fessiree! Here's a good-sized order 
■ou can really get your teeth into. So 
ou start out with your work sheets 
ind rough drafts setting up a rota- 
ion schedule. Oops! Two paragraphs 
ater they reverse their field and give 
ou a different rotation order than 
ou started out with. But you're still 
n a forgiving mood (after all, it is 

14-a-week order I and gamely, if 
lot cheerfully, you start over. Several 
heets of workpaper later, you find 
hi- gay little hand-written note: 

"P.S. Have just discovered that we 
lo not have sufficient slides to send 
ill of those listed above. ..." 

B\ now, grimly vowing never to 
at another one of those (product) 
is long as you live, you once again 
tart your charts. Oh. yes, the next 
lav we get a phone call delaying the 
tart of the entire schedule and, 
latu rally, shifting just a few spots. 

6. Infernally Informal. Some 
>f those cheery little informal notes 
ire the ones that can throw you! 

'"7 his does not involve any change 
n schedule of any hind, just a new 

el of films to feature our 

oils when they are scheduled {cool 
veather — 35 to 40 degrees) on your 
tat ion." 

This, in a clime and season when 
laily fluctuations in temperature were 
;oing ten to twenty-five degrees on 
{■her side of these brackets. Subse- 
)uent letters of instruction took away 
Sen this slight leeway and pin- 
jointed the breaking point at a very 
lefinite 42 degrees. We don't sup- 
oose it would surprise any of you to 
viiou that film schedules are made up 
wo to four days in advance of air 
ime. Eisenhower didn't get this kind 
A service for D-Day. 

7. Let-George-Do-It Lethargy. 
"During the week of April 26, 

your local newspaper ivill be running 
'in advertisement announcing the 

— offer. This is scheduled to 

nn ipril 30 but please recheck the 
•leuspaper for a definite date. On the 
lay this advertisement appears, please 
use on all commercials, number 
12-589 and 12-605." 

Translated: The agency can't co- 
irdinate their advertising campaign. 



so let's put the monkey on the back 
of the tv station. 

Also in this classification is the 
letter of "instructions" which merely 
gives you a list of films, and then 
asks vou "within 21 hours" to send 
the agency a list of how you will 
alternate the films and at what times 
on what days they are scheduled. 
Where were they when the schedule 
was placed? Don't they know what 
they bought for their client? 

Besides these specific categories, we 
are all too familiar with what is be- 
coming commonplace: Instructions 



received after the starting dale on the 
schedule; as mam as five changes a 
week on rotation schedules for one 
account; requests to go down to the 
express office over the weekend, wait 
for films, then escort them to the sta- 
tion and see that they are aired 
promptly. 

But the clincher was received the 
other daj : \ii Mail and Special De- 
livery came a beautifulK embossed 
agency letterhead — perfectly blank. 

Whatever it was supposed to be, 
I'LL BET WE DID IT WKOMi! ^ 



YOU'RE ONLY 

HALF-COVERED 

IN NEBRASKA 




IF YOU DON'T USE KOLN-TY! 



.DODO 

-Hoc* 



This is Lincoln-Land — KOLN-TVs NCS 

No. 3. Figures show percentages of TV ■ ^™ 

homes reached weekly, day or night. I 3l3E 



NO OMAHA STATION COVERS LINCOLN! 



60 

1 40 

§30 

E» 



omtHi statioh -A- 


































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ARB I9SS 



19S* 



1957 
Hi au 



9~fte tye/yet if/eifiom 

WKT.O TV — GRAND RADIOS KALAMAZOO 
WKIO RADIO — ialama:00 BATHE CUB 
WJEf RADIO — GRANO RAP10S 
WJEF fM — GRAND RAPIDS KALAMAZOO 

www — Cadillac. Michigan 

KOlN TV — LINCOLN, NCIIA&KA 




There are just two big, important TV 
markets in Nebraska. One is in the ex- 
treme Eastern part of the state. The other 
is Lincoln-Land. 

Lincoln-Land contains more than half 
the buying power of the entire state, and 
it's completely dominated by one TV sta- 
tion — KOLN-TV! In the Eastern market, 
no fewer than thrrc TV stations compete 
for viewers' attention. 

Avery-Knodel will give you all the facts 
on KOLN-TV— Official Basic CHS Outlet 
for South Central Nebraska and .Northern 
Kansas. 



K0LNTV 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT TOWIR 

COVERS LINCOLN-LAND — NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIO MARKET 

Aitry Knodtl, Inc., txclutivt Nofionof >«pr«f«nfotiv*> 



SPONSOR 



25 july L959 





TV 

Advertising 

A Handbook of Modern Practice 
By ARTHUR BELLAIRE 

Vice President, Batten, Barton, Durstine and Osborn 

*"I hope all my sponsors - past, 
present and future — will give it a 
thoughtful reading." 

Here are explicit directions on 
how to create television advertising 
from the basic theme to the fin- 
ished product. 

"I am very much impressed by 
the amount of practical and meaty 
information he has compressed 
into this book and how clearly this 
information has been organized." 
—Otto Kleppner, 
The Kleppner Company 

$6.50 at your bookstore or from 
HARPER & BROTHERS, N. Y. 16 



78 







Tv and radio 
NEWSMAKERS 



I 






James H. Moore, executive v.p. of Shen- 
andoah Life Stations (WSLS-AM-FM-TV, 
Roanoke, Va. ) , has been promoted to presi- 
dent. Moore joined the station as man- 
ager when WSLS was built in 1940. Prior 
to that, he was with WLVA, Lynchburg, Va., 
for seven years, as announcer, program 
director and later, assistant mgr. He began jn 
his radio career in Charlotte, with WBT 
and the Dixie Network. Moore attended Appalachian State Teachers (pi 
College, Boone, N. C, and was a singer in radio for eight years, 





Robert M. Prentice has been promoted to 
the newly created position of marketing 
services director of Lever Bros. He will 
have staff responsibility for all promo- 
tional activities of the company and will 
continue to supervise the marketing in- 
formation unit which he formerly headed. 
Prentice joined Lever in 1956 as product 
manager, later becoming manager of the 
advertising policy department. Previously, he was with Compton, 
Clifford, Steers & Shenfield Advertising and General Foods Co. 

Allen Hundley is the new manager of the 
John E. Pearson Co.'s Dallas office. He 
comes from NTA, Inc. where he was field 
representative out of Dallas. Previously he 
was with the Katz Co., served as manager 
of KNOE, Monroe and KDSX, Dennison. 
He was also associated with WHOM, New 
York and the sales promotion department 
of- Mutual Broadcasting Co. Hundley is a 
graduate of Louisiana State U. and Columbia U. He's married, the 
father of four; a member of the Association of Broadcasting 
Execs and the Variety Club of Texas. He replaces Ralph Widman. 

Bergen F. Newell, account executive with 
R. E. McCarthy & Associates, Tampa, has 
authored a recently published book: Naked 
Before My Captors. The novel, not about 
advertising men, is concerned with post- 
war, occupied Germany. Newell has been 
with the Florida agency for the past three 
years. His prior experience includes a 
stint as national advertising manager for 
two newspapers — The Idaho Daily Statesman and The Montgomery 
Advertiser and Journal, and head of his own agency in Boise, Idaho. 



1l 



:.; 





SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



How to put in a full day's work 

... before breakfast 



juaker Oats has to get its work 
i before breakfast or it's too 
ite. So Ad Director, Robert 
lacdonald, developed a philos- 
phy anyone can use— "Do it 
low ! Do it yesterday ! But don't 
iut it off until tomorrow!" 



t's a formula that looks to the 
uture and, for that reason, 
ds very naturally into selling 
nore than just product. 

Develop a personality. 

Ivlr. Macdonald feels that in- 
corporating public interest 
Inessages in product advertis- 
ing is an excellent way to pre- 
pare today for tomorrow. 

I'lt helps develop a friendly, 
likeable corporate personality," 
'he says. "And this is just as 
important as building a favor- 
able franchise for consumer 
'product. A favorable corporate 
image makes it easier to get 
credit in financial circles, to 
attract reliable personnel and 
makes our own shareholders 
and employees feel that their 
company is unselfishly inter- 
ested in the nation's welfare." 

"And," adds Mr. Macdonald, 
"do it now, or it will be more 
difficult later." 

What was done? 

Mr. Macdonald asked his top 
management to get behind the 
Advertising Council ... to in- 
corporate Council public serv- 
ice projects in all advertising of 
Quaker Oats products. 

Figures from October '56 
through January '59 show how 
massive the program has been. 
Newspaper circulation carrying 
Quaker Oats ads in support of 
Council causes was 130,585,940; 
magazine circulation, 244,713,- 
016; home impressions on TV 
and radio were 259,357,600 on 
network programs alone. 




You can benefit, too. 

You can help your company 
build a more favorable corpo- 
rate image. Include Advertising 
Council drop-ins in your regu- 
lar advertising; use a Council 
advertisement instead of "Com- 
pliments of a Friend" in your 
yearbook advertising; see that 
Council campaign posters are 
on bulletin boards in all your 
offices and plants. 

The advertising materials — re- 
production proofs, newspaper 
proofs and mats, posters, copy 
for radio and TV spots, etc. — 
are free. The current campaigns 
are: 

Aid to Higher Education 

Better Mental Health 

Better Schools 

Crusade for Freedom* 

Forest Fire Prevention 

'Red Cross* 

Register, Contribute, Vote* 

Religion in American Life 

Religious Overseas Aid 

Stop Accidents 

United Fund Campaigns* 

United Nations* 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

*Not year-round campaigns 

For more information send in 
the coupon below, or call the 
Advertising Council branch 
office nearest you. Branches in 
Chicago, Los Angeles and 
Washington, D. C. 



| THE ADVERTISING 

25 West 45th Street, 

1 New York 36, New 

1 Please tell me ho 
in with the Counc 


COUNCIL, 
York 

w to tie 
1. 


INC., 

m 


1 NAME 


1 COMPANY 


I ADDRESS 





SPONSOR 



25 july 1959 



7" 



SPONSOR 



The meaning of specials 

The most challenging, provocative and deeply significant 
development of the current air media year is the great tidal 
wave of special programs, scheduled to appear on the tv net- 
works this fall. 

Every thoughtful advertising man will want to examine 
this unusual phenomenon and ask searching questions about 
it. Why is it happening? What does it mean? 

As reported in last week's sponsor, the 1959-60 tv season 
will see well over 150 of these super-shows, each costing more 
than $300,000 for a single performance. 

Practically every kind of advertiser will be using specials 
this year, and interest in this type of programing is so high 
that many agencies are already negotiating for specials to 
appear in the fall of 1960. 

For the average tv viewer, the rush to specials probably 
means a higher level of tv network entertainment than he has 
ever known before. But to many agencies and advertisers 
the trend represents a new approach to the tv medium. 

A defeat for slide rules 

Most notable aspect of the great rise of specials is the fact 
that denotes a real defeat for the slide-rule boys, who see tv 
merely in terms of circulations, ratings and costs-per- 1,000. 

Specials cannot be justified on these terms. There are other, 
more efficient methods of using tv, if you are looking only for 
statistics, for cume audiences and low cpm's. 

What specials supply to an advertiser is the priceless in- 
gredient of excitement, the ability to stimulate enthusiasm 
among salesmen and retailers, to fill distribution pipelines, to 
create news and attention values for products and brands. 

This excitement factor is, and always has been, a major 
consideration in all sound advertising strategy. The current 
rush to specials means, among other things, that tv is freeing 
itself of old, myopic timebuying concepts and assuming a 
larger role in over-all marketing. 

THIS we fight FOR: Recognition that the 
air media cannot exist simply on facts and fig- 
ures. Challenging creativity is even more im- 
portant in maintaining the health of radio/tv. 



80 




lO-SECOND SPOTS 

Syndication: In New York, 11 ad- 
men from six agencies and one inde- 
pendent research firm have formed 
The Ad Research Fund, dedicated to 
making money in the stock market. 
They are: Paul Klein and lerry 
Sachs, DDB; Norm Petersell, OBM; 
Marty Stern, JWT; Sol Katz, D&C; 
Bernard Ober, John Grossman, Henry 
Serval and Joe Benjamin, Esty; Man- 
ny Mansfield, Mansfield Research. Ad 
Research Fund has been operating for 
about eight months; per capita profits 
— 81^ each. 

Expose: Ever wonder what holds up 
the line at a bank window? Here's an 
eye-witness account by Jack O'Reilly, 
of WPEN, Philadelphia: Man gives 
teller paycheck, says, "Hold the 
money; I want to make some de- 
posits." Hands in Christmas club 
book. Next, hands teller savings de- 
posit slip incorrectly made out; fills 
out another. Tries to make a deposit 
in his vacation club without his book; 
no luck. Decides he has over-deposited 
in his savings and had better make 
a withdrawal; another slip. Confused 
teller finally hands out residue of pay- 
check. Man pushes back five, asks 
for five singles. Hands back one dol- 
lar, asks for ten dimes. Comes up 
with half dollar, gets two quarters. 
Departs, probably looking for another 
line in another bank. 

Giveaway: Business card of Sam 
Schneider, CBS Radio, Chicago: 
GOOD FOR ONE FREE DRINK 

at any bar, cafe, bus station, hotel 
if accompanied by 

SAM 

Our busy FCC: The FCC uncovered 
the reason for radio interference 
down in Texas to be walkie-talkies 
used by members of a military reserve 
unit for unofficial purposes. One fel- 
low covered a golf tournament with 
his; another, who worked in a super 
market, "walkie-talkied" the transfer 
of groceries from the stockroom to 
the store. 

Versatile: When Seth Adams de-: 
livered the Ford commercial at the 
end of Wagon Train, my seven-year- 
old son said, "Hey, Ma, he can drive 
a car too!" — Mabel Renfro. 






SPONSOR 



25 JULY 1959 














4 




If you're marketing drug products . . . 

In Oklahoma, 697c of all drug products are purchased in the WKY-TV coverage 
area. It's not that our viewers are any less healthy— it's just that we have more 
viewers. And they're more responsive. Guess you might say we're experts at 
getting pocketbooks to open up and say 'AHHHHH." 



1949-1959 

• 

CELEBRATING 

10 

YEARS 

TELEVISION 

SERVICE 

TO 

_OKLAHOMANS 



\AI%C V TELEVISION 

V OKLAHOMA CITY 



NBC Channel 4 



The WKY Television System, Inc. 

WKY Radio, Oklahoma City 

WTVT, Tampa • St. Petersburg, Fla. 

WSFA-TV, Montgomery, Ala. 



... V~i- 



KMBC 



FILLS NEWS GAP 



IN KANSAS CITY PRESS STRIKE 

Acts Immediately and Vigorously ... Dynamic Difference < 
KMBC News Service Wins Tremendous Public Acclain 



Service Included 192 Weekly 
KMBC Newscasts . . . 21,600 
Twice-Daily Print-Bulletins in 
America's 17th Market During 
Ten Newspaperless Days 



It was 8 p.m. Thursday, June 18, when 
strike-vote decided Kansas City would 
not have any daily newspaper on Friday. 
KMBC immediately beefed up its expert 
news staff. Its AM and TV newscasting 
was expanded, starting Friday morn- 
ing, to 192 full-scale newscasts per week. 
Friday afternoon, 300 Yellow Cab signs 
designed, printed and installed in six 
hours!— told all Kansas City that KMBC 
was the place to get news. Emergency 
production of condensed news-bulletins 
began flowing off KMBC mimeographs. 

Taxis and messengers stood by to rush 
each edition to hotels, restaurants, Ath- 
letics' stadium, Starlight municipal the- 
atre, civic club meetings — all free, all 
eagerly grabbed by a grateful public — 
thirteen editions in eight days — 21,600 
daily print bulletins — proving again what 
Kansas City knows: In news, in emer- 
gencies, it is KMBC that SERVES. 

Pre-planned and immediately effective 
action by KMBC AM-TV in filling the 
news void brought instant, enthusiastic 
public response. It made possible complete 
awareness of local, regional, national and 
international events by everyone in the 
huge coverage area of KMBC-TV, KMBC 
and bonus-station KFRM which serves 
all of Kansas. This was done without 
disruption of regularly scheduled pro- 
grams — KMBC AM and TV audiences 
enjoyed all of their favorite TV shows, 
all of the refreshing hours of the "Top 
10,000 Tunes," just as they always do, 
every day! 

g! Popular feature of KMBC 
news coverage during 
press strike was special 
teletype and facsimile 
pictures set up in display 
windows of large down- 
town Kansas City depart- 
ment store. 



"Cab - casting", played 
vital part. With only six 
hours notice, taxi cards 
were designed, printed 
and in tailed on 300 
Yellow Cabs to tell all 
K. C. that KMBC was 
news nerve center during 
press strike. 



Tn Kansas CitH ihe Swi ng is 






"laude Dorsey (left), KMBC AM-TV news chief, and staff in KMBC newsroom just before 
start of K.C. press strike. At strike's onset, KMBC immediately added personnel for emer- 
gency's duration. Other news staffers shown: Pat Petree at news booth mike; Charles Groy 
at phone, and Max Bicknell checking news service teletype. 




News Chief Dorsey 
In 20th Year at KMBC 

KMBC AM-TV's crack news staff, 
headed by veteran news chief Claude 
Dorsey, this month marking his 20th year with 
KMBC, has become noted for award-winning 
radio-TV journalism. "It's lively coverage — 
getting there first with responsible, accurate 
reporting," says Dorsey, "that leads to scoops. 
This is why our scoops just seem to happen — 
without any need for hurried incompleteness, 
inaccuracy or sensationalism." 

To locally originated news programing has 
recently been added a series of hour-long TV 
documentaries examining in depth such his- 
toric events as the Berlin crisis and the Rus- 
sian Revolution. 

Local news is supplemented by news of na- 
tional and worldwide significance streaming 
into KMBC AM-TV newsrooms at the rate of 
250,000 words daily from United Press Inter- 
national and Associated Press — plus films and 
wirephotos — and by 16 daily network reports 
and commentaries by such nationally famous 
news figures as John Daly, Edward P. Mor- 
gan, John W. Vandercook and Paul Harvey. 

News is where you find it, and KMBC find's 
it at home and throughout the world, reports 
it promptly, accurately and frequently to an 
avidly news-conscious audience of nearly four 
million persons! Excellent news programing 
and unmatched audience coverage in Amer- 
ica's 17th largest market account for KMBC 
AM-TV TOPularity . . . and for the terrific 
sales results experienced by advertisers using 
time within the KMBC news structure. 

KMBC News Staff 

Makes Scoops a Habit 

During the November strike of Trans-World 
Airlines machinists, the KMBC news staff's 
diligence and reputation for responsible re- 



porting enabled KMBC-KFRM to broadc 
exclusive coverage of a secret meeting 
union and TWA officials, to report it bef 
the meeting even became known to ot 
media, and subsequently to "scoop" all ot 
media on the strike's conclusion. 

Recent Cuban revolution was literally 
forcefully "brought home" to KMBC AM- 
audiences through exclusive pictures of 
interviews with the head of Kansas Ci 
own "26th of July" movement set up here 
Fidel Castro to assume responsibility for 
Kansas City Cuban consulate. 

In January, KMBC AM-TV news staff g 
the only complete coverage of the tense 
ments before, during and after the en 
gency belly-landing of TWA Constellatiot 
nearby Olathe Naval Base. The coverage oi| 
pied more than two hours of radio and 
time and included personal interviews 
ported over the only available open line 
supplemented by on-scene photographs 
telecasts. 

Local Features Build Audien< 

"Driver-Scope", a KMBC exclusive, rem| 
rush-hour motorists of careless driving 
ards, awards cash to observed careful drivl 
renders a welcome service to KMBC listetf 
on the move. 

KMBC "Weather-Scope", by constant <| 
tact with the U. S. Weather Bureau, br<f 
casts up-to-the-minute news coverage ti 
each hour — keeps its vast audience forewai[ 
of dangerous weather conditions, torr| 
threats. 

KMBC "Baseball Scoreboard", hourlyl 
the half-hour, 1:30-11:30 p.m., gives ml 
league baseball scores quickly, completj 
keeps fans tuned to KMBC-AM. 

Check your Peters - Griffin - WoodiM 
"Colonel" now for full facts and sales-bof 
ing availabilities on KMBC-KFRM 
KMBC-TV news programs. 



to 




KMBC-TV a 

Kansas City's Most Popular and Most Powerful TV Station 
and in Radio the Swing Is to 

KMBC «4 Kansas City — KFRM fa the State of Kansas 

with 10,000 Watts Power from Twin Transmitters 



DON DAVIS, President 
JOHN SCHILLING, Executive 
GEORGE HIGGINS, Vice Pres.| 
ED DENNIS, Vice President 
MORI GREINER, Television Ml 
DICK SMITH, Radio Manager 



& 



Peters. G| 
Woodwa 



SPO 



L3th annual edition 



PONSOR'S AIR MEDIA 




Timebuying Basics 
Radio Basics 
Television Basics 



'age 9 
Page 35 
Page 93 



Film & Tape Basi 
Marketing Basic 
5 -City Directory 



Page 163 
Page 179 
Page 20^ 






FOR COMPLETE INDEX SEE PAGE 



RCA 5KW FM TRANSMITTER 

TYPE BTF-5B 
DESIGNED FOR MULTIPLEXING AND REMOTE CONTROL 












THIS NEW FM TRANSMITTER is designed for 
both conventional and multiplex operation. 
Outstanding performance features such as, a 
direct FM system, built-in remote control pro- 
visions, screen voltage power output control, 
and many others, make the BTF-5B today's 
best FM transmitter buy. 

ADEQUATE COVERAGE— Its 5000-watt power 
output provides adequate coverage of a multi- 
plex channel and improved coverage for conven- 
tional operation. The high power level permits 
the use of low-gain antennas to achieve a 
high ERP. 

UNIQUE EXCITER -New FM Exciter, Type 
BTE-10B, uses "Direct FM" modulator cir- 
cuits, thus fewer tubes are required. Automatic 
frequency control system with frequency 
detector prevents off frequency operation. 

MULTIPLEX ACCESSORIES — Subcarrier gener- 
ators for multiplex operation are available as 
optional equipment. There is room inside the 
new transmitter for mounting one of these 
generators. Exciter and subcarrier generators 
are also available as separate items for use with 
existing FM transmitters. 

BROADBAND ANTENNA— New antenna 
designed to meet low VSWR requirements of 
multiplex system is available, along with a 
complete line of FM accessories. 



For all your FM needs call your nearest RCA 
Broadcast Representative or write to RCA, 
Dept. FF-261, Budding 15-1, Camden, X. J. 

IN CANADA: 
RCA VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal 




OUTSTANDING FEATURES OF THE BTF-5B 



Designed for Remote Control 

Direct FM System 

Designed for Multiplexing 

Fewer Tubes and Tuned Circuits 

Built-in Oscilloscope for Easy Tuning 

Choice of Colors 

Matching Rack Available for Accessories 

and Additional Subcarrier Generator 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 




Tmk(s) ® 



BROADCAST AND TELEVISION EQUIPMENT 
CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY 




A CBS Affiliate 

10,000 Watts on 680 KC 
Baltimore 13, Maryland 



KEEP SALES 
IN BALTIMORE 





Schedule the PREFERRED 
Radio Station . . . 

To get the most from your radio dollar you must reach the adult 
spending audience. That means WCBM in Baltimore . . . where 
month after month surveys* show the greatest percentage of 
adult radio listeners PREFER WCBM programming! Get all the 
facts and you will see why agencies, too . . . PREFER WCBM ! 
*Nielsen Adult Listenership Surveys 



Peters, Griffin, Woodward, inc. 

Exclusive National Representatives 



July 1959 



AIR MEDIA BASICS INDEX 



H TIMEBUYING 
BASICS 

TIMEBUYING BASICS starts on page 9 

INDEX TO TIMEBUYING BASICS is on page 11 

What's in Timebuying Basics 

Ratings Basics starts on page 14 

This section on ratings provides easy-to-absorb information 
for the beginner as well as the more advanced timebuyer. It 
includes explanations of cume audience, share and other terms 

Coverage Basics starts on page 20 

This will give you a simple way to estimate distances of both 
radio and tv signal coverage. The charts take into account 
station power, frequency and terrain. Uhf map is also included 

Timebuyer's Tools starts on page 24 

Here is some handy material to make a timebuyer's life easier. 
Includes a seldom-found chart showing sunset times by hours 
so you can check what regions of the U.S are in darkness 

Cost Basics starts on page 27 

Want to get a quick idea of what a spot radio or tv campaign 
will cost? Here are two estimators to do the job. Included 
is material taking into account campaign length, discounts 

Timebuying Tips starts on page 29 

Eight tips on common timebuying problems are given here. 
They cover such areas as total vs. metro station audience, sea- 
sonal viewing patterns, audience composition and other problems 

Audience Basics starts on page 31 

Included in this section is an audience composition table 
that will enable you to do some calculations not possible 
with the usual audience composition data of rating services 



1 ] RADIO 
BASICS 

RADIO BASICS starts on page 35 

INDEX TO RADIO BASICS is on page 37 

What's in Radio Basics 

Listening Habits starts on page 38 

Mostly in-home radio listening facts are listed in this part. 
The audience is viewed from various angles: by hours of the 
day, by seasons, by parts of the day, by local and N. Y. time 

Out-of-Home Listening starts on page 44 

The important extra of out-of-home listening is given separate 
treatment. The emphasis here is how out-of-home listening 
varies by seasons but other kinds of data are also available 




Spot Radio's Cumulative Audience starts.. page 52 

Since cumulative audiences are the only real measure of radio's 
audience, a special section is devoted to this category. 
Bulk of the charts cover rate at which audiences accumulate 

Spending and Costs starts on page 56 

The basic facts about advertiser expenditures and rates are 
collected here for the convenience of buyers and researchers. 
Included is a listing of the top radio agencies in the business 

Network Patterns is on page 62 

Three items of interest to network buyers are charted in this 
section. They include the popularity of various program lengths 
among buyers, audience reach and the top network shows 

Dimensions starts on page 64 

By "dimensions" is meant the basic data on the number of 
radio homes, radio stations, radio sets and where the sets 
and homes are located. This is the broad view of the medium 

Set Production is on page 68 

Shown here is a picture of radio set production through the 
years as well as the types of sets that are popular. The 
figures generally testify to radio's strong hold in the U.S. 

RADIO STATIONS AND REPS starts on. page 70 

Here is a compilation of stations and their reps especially 
tailored for the timebuyer who has to buy a lot of stations 
in a hurry — and what timebuyer doesn't have to do that? 



JL ' TElEVISI0N 

" BASICS i 

TELEVISION BASICS starts on page 93 

INDEX TO TELEVISION BASICS is on page 95 

What's in Television Basics 

Viewing Habits starts on page 96 

In addition to hour-by-hour viewing information, there's some 
interesting quintile figures about tv's daytime and night- 
time audience as well as detailed audience composition facts 

Spending and Costs starts on page 106 

Here are figures on tv spending through the years and how the 
advertisers divide their money among network, spot and local 
media. Also shown are spending by industries and top tv clients 

Network Program Trends starts on page 116 

A number of breakdowns compare audiences to the various show 
categories. There are also facts and figures on network lineups 
and trends on network program lengths and type of sponsorship 

Color Tv starts on page 122 

A summary of color tv's status is followed by a listing (as 
complete as is practical) of stations equipped for color. Also 
there's a listing of advertisers who have used color and how 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 





66 



about "THE 

CRITICAL 
YEARS" 



BARTELL FAMILY RADIO 

NOW IN ITS 13th YEAR 
. . , the mark of Professionalism 

AND SOON SERVING OVER 

TWENTY MILLION AMERICANS 
IS PROUD TO PRESENT 




Hon. RICHARD M. NIXON 

Vice President 
of the United States 

"I want to. . .congratulate 

. . . Bartell Family Radio 

. . . this, in truth, represents 

a very real public service". 



99 



A bold, razor-edged documentary on juvenile delinquency. 

j Told by "Tommy", a seventeen-year old who reveals the twisted code 

of America's misguided youth. His story — his personal crusade 

toward good citizenship is breathtaking in its direct 

simplicity. Already applauded by government 

agencies and distinguished community 

leaders, this will be the most widely 

discussed broadcasting achievement of 

1959. Another in the continuing series of 

community services by Bartell Family Radio, 

coast to coast. 

Hon. EDMUND G. BROWN 

Governor, 
State of California 

In the finest tradition M p 0N REQUEST _ f REE F0 R BROADCASTING - 

'Bro'adSiftinP^ 6 FR ° M DOCUMENTARY PRODUCTIONS DIVISION 

OF BARTELL FAMILY RADIO 

"The Critical Years" 
"The Narcotics Story" 
"The Mental Health Story" 

0, P.O. BOX 1629, SAN DIEGO 



i 



BARTELL 



WOKY Milwaukee, KYA San Francisco, WAKE Atlanta, WYOE Birmingham, KCBQ San Diego, 
WOV New York City (pending) 



July 1959 



Dimensions starts on page 128 

These are the base figures of tv advertising — the saturation 
of tv and where the homes are located. There's also other 
data showing the rate of tv's growth and its current dimensions 

Set Production is on page 131 

Besides the basic set production figures (including a yearly 
summary of the uhf picture), there are other useful data here 
on sets, including an eye-opening chart on spending by the public 

TV STATIONS AND REPS starts on page 132 

Like the radio listing above, this station compilation is con- 
fined to call letters and names of reps, arranged by state and 
market for the timebuyer who doesn't have time on his hands 

TV HOMES BY COUNTY starts on page 137 

This is the updated county-by-county listing put out recently 
by A. C. Nielsen with 1959 estimates of the number of homes 
and the percent of homes having tv. A handy list to have around 



J, m ] FILM & TAPE 
BASICS 

FILM & TAPE BASICS starts on page 163 

INDEX TO FILM & TAPE BASICS is on page 16S 

What's in Film & Tape Basics 

Syndication Basics starts on page 166 

Contained here is real useful data on both time and program 
costs for syndication in a number of the top tv markets. You 
may also be interested in what the big syndication boys buy 

Commercials Basics starts on page 168 

Figures on commercial costs and a couple of handy tools are 
given in this section. The latter include a brace of timing 
charts for admen closely involved in commercial production 

Tape Basics starts on page 171 

The relatively new field of tape is highlighted here in terms of 
tape coverage of the U.S. and a listing of tape shows now or 
soon to be in syndication. Useful for both tyro and expert 




Glossary starts on page 174 

Of special interest here is a separate section on the new 
language of tape. The film glossary covers not only production 
terms but words used in the day-to-day routine of buying 



JL] MARKETING 
BASICS 

MARKETING BASICS starts on page 179 

INDEX TO MARKETING BASICS is on page 181 

What's in Marketing Basics 

"100 million more consumers in 20 years" 

starts on page 182 

Here's a brief article on what the coming U.S. population 
explosion means to radio and tv. This is a fact of marketing 
life seldom interpreted in terms of the broadcasting industry 

Population Basics starts on page 186 

Not only the current population picture but a Census-eye view 
of what the future will bring. Other charts cover the Negro 
market, trends in family size, age breakdowns and other data 

Consumer Spending Basics starts on page 194 

Detailed breakdowns on how much consumer spends on various 
products are presented here. A fundamental group of figures 
for the radio and tv man who wants to bone up on marketing 

Retailing Basics starts on page 198 

A knowledge of retailing is getting to be a must for the buyer 
aiming at the executive level. Here are some key data on 
spending by consumers and trends in the food and drug fields 

5-CITY DIRECTORY 

5-City Directory starts on.. page 205 

sponsor's popular listing of the important addresses and phone 
numbers in the advertising business is reproduced here to make Air 
Media Basics even more useful. This is an updated version — brand 
new as of July 1959 and published in advance of the regular booklet. 
It includes not only advertisers, agencies and representatives, but 
film distributors, research sources, music makers, promotion outfits 
and even hotels and restaurants. You'll be referring to this daily 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllilllllllll^ 



STAFF FOR SPONSOR'S 13TH ANNUAL AIR'MEDIA BASICS 



Publisher 

Assistant Publisher 

Air Media Basics Editor 

Section Editors 

Editorial Research 

Art Editor 



Norman R. Glenn 
Bernard Piatt 
Alfred J. Jaffe 
Jane Pinker ton 
Heyward Ehrlich 
Barbara Wiggins 
Elaine Mann 
Maury Kurtz 



sponsor is published weekly, with Air Media Basics as Section 2 in July, by Sponsor Publications, Inc. Entered 
as 2nd class matter on 29 January 1948 at the post office of Baltimore, Md. under the Act of 3 March 1879. 
Copyright 1959, Sponsor Publications, Inc. 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 




Hke watching ]J^ J-TV 

in FRESNO (California) 



KMJ-TV is the big favorite of 
Fresno housewives. In the weekday 
hours between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., 
KMJ-TV is the preferred station. 
The latest ARB* shows KMJ-TV 
first in 80 of 180 quarter-hours dur- 
ing this period — a 46% greater 
preference than the next station. 

For daytime movies, KMJ-TV is 
also first choice with Nancy Allan's 
top-rated MGM Movie Matinee. 

*ARB May 8-14, 1959 



KMJ-TV . . . 

first station in 

The Billion-Dollar 

Valley of the Bees 





THE KATZ AGENCY. NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 



July 1959 



LAUGH THINK SCARE CKX 



I 
I 




IT TAKES ALL KINDS OF SHOWS... TO SELL ALL KINDS OF PRODUCTS.. 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



THRILL EXCITE MYSTIFY 




M I 



CALL KINDS OF PEOPLE... AND McCANN-ERICKSON TV COVERS THEM ALL'. 



' 



July 1959 



WHEREVER THERE'S 




USI C I N C ■ 589 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK 17. N.V. 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 



IMEBUYING 

BASICS 



SECTIO 




effectiveness 



5 ""Hi UijC 



•ebso^al sw*» Tools & Tips: //,, 



e is a 






wanna* 




Host. 



*H% 




handy compendium of use Jul 
facts for the tv/ radio bu ) er, 
including easy -to-under stand 
charts on ratings, coverage, 
spot costs and audience data 
plus other material to male 
the timebuyer's life easier 



s 7;30 a.m. 



*V 




50,000 more watts 

FOR YOTJNGPRESENTATION 



Km 
F> A 
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LOS ANGELES announces 
the appointment, effective 
July 1, of ADAM YOUNG, INC. 
as national representatives 



Now the Adam Young man is 50,000 watts more 
valuable to you when he comes calling ... or when you 
call him about your Los Angeles marketing plans. 



ADAM YOUNG INC. 

Representing all that's modern and effective in radio today 



NEW YORK 

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New York 22. N.Y. 
Plaza 1-4848 



CHICAGO 

Prudential Plaza 
Chicago 1. III. 
Michigan 2-6190 



SAN FRANCISCO 

Puss Bldg. (Rm. 1207) 
San Francisco 4, Calif. 
YUkon 6-6769 



ST. LOUIS 

317 No. Eleventh St. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
MAin 1-5020 



DETROIT 

2940 Book Bldg. 
Detroit 26. Mich. 
WOodward 3-6919 



LOS ANGELES 

6331 Hollywood Blvd. 
Los Angeles 28. Calif. 
HOIIywood 2-2289 



ATLANTA 

1182 W. Peachtree 
Atlanta. Ga. 
TRinity 3-2564 



10 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



n 



TIMEBUYING 

TIMEBUYING BASICS 



INDEX 



RATINGS BASICS 



Explanations of cume audiences, duplication, cost-per- 1,000 page 14 

Difference between rating and share ; coverage and ratings page 15 

How to figure out accuracy of rating; statistical error table page 16 

How to understand Nielsen terminology; four examples presented., page 17 



COVERAGE BASICS 



The reach of good quality tv signals, vhf and uhf included page 20 

How power, frequency, and terrain affects radio signals page 22 

Where uhf stations are: a map shows their locations page 23 



DMEBUYER'S TOOLS 

What happens in 100 top markets during Daylight Saving Time page 24 

How to figure renewal and expiration dates for ad campaigns page 25 

How to know what part of the U.S. is in darkness; by hours page 26 



ICOST BASICS 



How to figure the cost of a spot radio campaign ; 150 markets page 27 

How to figure the cost of a spot tv campaign ; 150 markets page 28 



TIMEBUYING TIPS 



First page covering group of eight tips on how to use ratings page 29 

Second page covering group of eight tips on how to use ratings page 30 



AUDIENCE BASICS 



U.S. population according to Nielsen audience composition page 31 

Examples of qualitative data available for network tv buyers page 32 

JULY 1959 • 11 



NOW... 






», 



STORIES THAT 

UNMASK 
THE MEN 

WHO RUN 

ORGANIZED 
CRIME! 



An entirely 
NEW KIND OF 
LAW ENFORCEMENT 
AGENCY . . . 
pledged to destroy 
those who prey upon 
the weak, helpless, 
ignorant and poor! 





But don't tell me 

run this puln>:|force! 







ZIV 




/""\r^Jli — \f 




as Col. Frank Dawson 
hief of Law Enforce me 



r ] i 

I TIMEBUYING i 



RATINGS BASICS 



How to understand the cumulative audience concept 



Illustration of four-week cumulative audience 



This Nielsen chart shows an example of a 
program which reaches three out of 10 homes (30 
rating) each week ior four weeks. A total of six 
out of 10 different homes tunes the show at one 
time or another during this period. Thus, the 
cumulative audience is 60%. Gross rating points 
(not the same thing) total 120 in this case (30 
rating times four). The number of times each 
home tunes during four weeks varies from one to 
three times but the average episodes comes to two 



X Homes Reached 
HOME A 

e 

c 


E 
F 
6 
H 
I 



Wee* 
I 

30% 



Week 
2 

30 



WecK 
3 



2 



,i 



Telecosn viewed \ . n 
per home reached / lu 



30 

i 




30 



10 



WeeK Cumulative 
4 Audience 

4 wife. 

60 



I 



No times viewed 
I 
I 
2 
3 
2 
3 



2.0 



Illlllllllllllllllllill :i!,;:N!!!:lt!!!ll!ll!lllll!!l!lll!!!lllll!!!!lllll!lllli!l!!ll!!llllllll!!ll!llllll!llll!iii!m^ 



How to calculate cost-per-1,000 homes for a commercial 



Computation of cost-per-1,000 commercial minutes for half -hour show 



Three figures are needed to calculate 
CPMHPCM: (1) cost of show and time, (2) 
homes viewing during average minute — which 
Nielsen calls average audience and (3) no. of 
commercial minutes per telecast. Note last three 
zeroes of homes total is dropped. This is to avoid 
dividing by 1,000 later on. First, multiply homes 
times no. of commercial minutes. This gives com- 
mercial minute impressions total, or home com- 
mercial minutes. Cost of show is divided by home 
commercial minutes total (minus three zeroes) 



PROGRAM DATA 



COST m TELECAST . . .$60,000 



HOMES VIEWING DURING 
AVG MINUTE COOO) . . 



NO. COMMERCIAL 
MINUTES P« TELECAST 



8.000 



HOMES 
VIEWING 
DURING 
AVERAGE 
MINUTE 

(too) 



8,000 



COMPUTATION 

H0MEC0MM1 

MINUTES PER 

TELECAST 

COOOI 

24,000" 



"3 = 



COST/ 1.000 

COMMERCIAL 

MINUTES 



COST 

MINUTES COOO) 

Oft 

$60,000 



•24,000 

OR 

52.50 



millllllllllllllll I1IIIIIII!IIIIIIII!I!IIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illlllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllllllllllilllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll Illllllllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllll III! Illllillllllllll Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



Duplication analyses: what they are 

Illllllllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllM Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

Typical duplication analyses — total U.S. radio homes basis 



Duplication analyses are made by adver- 
tisers to find out how much overlapping in audi- 
ences he gets with two or more different media. 
Two kinds are shown in the Nielsen chart at 
right. Both represent audiences reached by one 
advertiser in each case. Left side of the chart 
shows client reaches 40.2% of U. S. radio homes 
with tv and 7.6% of radio homes with radio. Half 
of homes reached with radio are also reached by 
tv. The combined reach of both media comes to 
44.1%, which is an unduplicated homes total 



RADIO and TV 

TV RA0I0 COMBINED 

20 th John Daly 
Century Hem 



•to homes An r, 

REACHED 4UZ 
{PER WEEK) 



76 



U D 



441 



36 5 



J2_ 

11 

20 



TV ml) 



g tut) 



90 

t j ccutmrio* or mmnK wskaus otjiCHA$£Der ok admr/sh 



network and SPOT 

network spot combined 
programs" schedule 



52 



320 




19.1 




404 
8.4 

10.7 
21.3 



Spot only 



network only 



Illiilllliiiii /iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 



14 



AIR MEDIA BASIC 



HI 

I TIMEBUYING j 



Ratings basics 



The difference between a rating and a share 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Explanation of how a rating differs from share of audience 



s 




Part of a Katz Agency presentation to familiarize 
salesmen with a fundamental bit of information on 
ratings, the chart at left covers a single broadcast 
period in which 1,000 homes were sampled. Pro- 
gram A was seen (or heard) by 200 sample homes 
or 20' f of the entire sample, Program i- B" by 120 
sample homes or 12% of the sample, etc. The rating 
refers to a percent of the sample, while the share 
refers to a percent of the homes watching I or listen- 
ing). In this case 1,000 homes equals 100 f « for 
the purpose of calculating the rating, while 400 
homes equals 1009? for purpose of figuring share. 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllfflllllllllllllllllliiilllllllW llllllllllllllllllll 

How program coverage affects ratings 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

How two network shows with same ratine can reach different-size audiences 



HOME 



Computation of program coverage 

) 9 HOMES 



A 
8 

c 



e 

F 
G 

H 

r 
j 



■ 



1 
■ 

2^ 



HOMiSABLETO 
QECBVE POOGHAM 



total us. 

TV HOMES 



) HOMES 



\l0» 

PRoatAM cove*Ace-% = 90.0X 



Y//////\ ABLE TO RECEIVE PROGRAM 
| | CANNOT RECEIVE PR06RAM 

To show actual program popularity, Nielsen reports ratings 
on Program Service Basis (PSB). This means the base 
on which the rating is calculated covers only those homes 
able to receive the program rather than entire U.S. Chart 



Comparing ratings of programs with 



different coverage 



COMPARISON WITHOUT 
COVERAGE OfTA 
TOTAL US 
TV HOMES = 100 100 


BUT PR06MM COVRM$£ 
DlffSK MIIXIV 


COMPARISON VSIHG 
C0VERA6C DATA 




360 




240 






907. 


















60% 




c 


400 








•1. 
HOMES REACHED 










400 


















J 


W06RAM 


A 




8 






A 




8 




A 


i n 


8 



at r i jili t shows two hypothetical cases in which program " \ " 
reaches 36% of U.S. homes and program "B" reaches 2 
However program "B" is beamed to only 60% of U.S. tv 
homes so its rating figures out as high as program "A." 



llllllllllllllll!llillllll!ll!lllllllllllllllilllllllllll!H 



.it Li 1959 



15 



' 1 1„ . 

timebuying J Ratings basics 



I TIMEBUYING J 



How to figure out the accuracy of a radio or tv rating 

^ : ,!'--l!l : ■ IT ' ;,!' i:: : :i : ^ -■ :;-■ '-' - ■ .|i ,[,: :l ;i ^ ;: ,■■ n .- ■- ;; ,; .,; ., i ..; : : :, : :: ■ ;:; : . : : - ,:; ;, ;■ .: j: , '.■;.-. -,, . r , ,;■;;".' ||||||||||||||||||||||| 

There are a number of ways to quote odds on the accuracy of a rating 




RATINC 



50 



Statistical error for tv and radio ratings (at 95% probability level) 



100 



9.8 



150 



8.0 



200 



300 



SAMPLE SIZE 

400 500 



800 



1,000 



2,000 



7.0 



5.6 



4.9 



4.4 



3.4 



3.1 



2.2 



5,000 



1.4 



10,000 



1 


2.0 


1.6 


1.4 


1.1 


1.0 


0.9 


0.7 


0.6 


0.4 


0.3 


0.2 


2 


2.8 


2.3 


2.0 


1.6 


1.4 


1.2 


1.0 


0.9 


0.6 


0.4 


0.3 


5 


4.3 


3.5 


3.0 


2.5 


2.2 


1.9 


1.5 


1.4 


0.9 


0.6 


0.4 


10 


6.0 


4.9 


4.2 


3.4 


2.9 


2,6 


2.1 


1.9 


1.3 


0.8 


0.6 


20 


7.9 


6.4 


5.6 


4.5 


3.9 


3.5 


2.7 


2.5 


1.8 


1.1 


0.8 


30 


9.0 


7.4 


6.4 


5.1 


4.5 


4.0 


3.1 


2.8 


2.0 


1.3 


0.9 


40 


9.6 


7.8 


6.8 


5.5 


4.7 


4.2 


3.4 


' 3.0 


2.2 


1.3 


0.9 



1.0 



Sampling homes to get a rating is something like shooting 
dice or playing horses. You can quote odds. Unlike dice or 
horse-racing, sampling (assuming its probability sampling) 
gives you a choice of odds. The lower the adds the greater 
the range of error you can figure on. The higher the odds the 
less the range of error — or range of confidence, as some peo- 
ple describe it. 

At the top of the page are three examples of quoting odds 
for a given rating, in this case, a 5. Take the "probable er- 
ror" or even money example. This says, "the chances are 
50-50 that if a sample of homes shows a rating of 5, a com- 
plete count of the homes would show the actual rating to be 
between 4.26 and 5.74 (plus or minus .74 rating points)." 
Most tv and radio researchers prefer tougher odds — specifical- 



ly the "2 standard errors" or 21-to-l odds — since they feel it 
reduces the chance element (the dark area on the right side 
of each box above) to a reasonable level. 

The table above shows the confidence range for the 21-to-l 
odds level. Each figure refers to a plus or minus the given 
rating. Note that this plus or minus differs according to rat- 
ing and sample size. (In the top chart, the confidence range 
is for a sample of 400.) A rating of 60 has the same range 
as a rating of 40; ratings of 70 and 30 also have identical 
figures, etc. The table, of course, cannot take into account 
errors due to poor sampling procedures, badly-designed ques- 
tionnaires, dishonest interviewers, reluctant respondents, etc. 
Top chart courtesy of the Katz Agency, table courtesy of John 
Blair and Co. 



!ill!llllllllllllll!!lllll!!!llllllilllllllllllllll!IIIIUIIIIII^ 



16 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



[minim 

J 



1 



timebuying J Ratings basics 



How to understand some basic Nielsen terminology 



Computation of homes using tv 



«O0-»«/»w« 



The Nielsen phrase, "homes using tv," show* the 
percent or number of homes in the area measured tuned 
in to all programs during a specific period of time. It is 
commonly computed on an average minute basis. Chart 
at right shows the computation for a 15-minute period. 
Note how the varying home totals for each minute (at 
bottom of chart) are averaged for the quarter-hour — in 
tlii- case six homes. Since the hypothetical total homes 
is 10, figure is 609c of total tv homes using television 




k-6007. 



3 34566667 7 

S£T TXJNED OV 



II 



miiiiiiiiii 



Computation of total audience 

tUlM 

fKfnm Miivtt I 2 3 4 S 6 7 I 9 10 II 12 13 M IS nous 



HOME * 










■■■■■■ 




;> 




;• 


$ 




^ 


^ 


8 




I 






































nor 


IN 


PRO 


6M 


M 


COW 


ERi 


Sf 


AB 


E4 

















































E 




^ 




m 
























f 






^ 


;>■ 


?sS 


^ 


^ 


IS 


% 


?$ 


: 


^ 


^ 


^ 




6 
































N 




c 






$ 


■ 




^ 


: 


^v 












I 








r 
























J 








:■ 


^ 




- 

















HOMES WfWWS I 
OR MORE 



HOMES ABIE | 
TO RECEIVE |. 9 
• PB06RAM 



v NIQSEN 
AUWEwfg 



I \ Set rvrtett HfToenewtnf ertmrpnyrim 



"Total audience" is a program rating. Note that 
Nielsen excludes homes not able to receive the program 
from the base on which the rating is calculated. Note 
also that homes viewing less than six minutes are ex- 
cluded from the total audience figure. This is done on 
the theory that idle dial twirling will result in some 
homes viewing the program for short periods — homes the 
advertiser is really not interested in. Since nine homes 
were able to tune the program and four did so, the TA 
rating is 44.4% (and a very good rating, too). The ad- 
vertiser can, if in- wishes, use the total tv home base, in 
which case the total audience rating would be 40% 



Computation of average audience 



This is the identical situation represented in the total 
■audience chart. However, in calculating the average 
audience (AA), homes viewing less than six minutes 
are included. Like the homes-using-tv figure, this is an 
average minute calculation, except that homes not in cov- 
erage area are excluded in this particular measurement 



kvgnm Minurt 


/ 


2 


3 4 


5 


* ; 


1 9 10 II 


12 


11 


4 


IS 




HOME A 




j ^fm^^m^ 


HOMES 


B 




! 1 i 1 I 1 i 1 1 1 


PROGRAM 




L11I11LLJ1II 


AVERAGE 

























i ! ! 1 1 


1 








gn 


| 


HOMES 

»8uro 
RECEIVE 
PROGRAM 


r 








s 






NIELSEN 


H 


5& 


mm : 










AVERAGE ■ 


I 






tekk 












J 








■mm 




Minute 



■\-mi 



M3H 2 2 3**444442222 

m Viewing progrtm 

C3 Set Tuned 'Off or viewing other program 

IllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllilillllPI!l!lllll;l!lllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllll^ 

Relationship of average audience to total audience 

For programs of different durations * 



Pngram duration IS mm 



NIELSEN TOrAL 
AUDIENCE 



30 mm 60 mm 



125 



NIELSEN AVWAGt" 
AUDIENCE INOEI 



105 




110 
















I(X) 




11)11 




KM 










' 













In comparing the program popularity of shows of 
different lengths, the average audience rather than the 
total audience is used. The chart at left shows why. \n 
hour show usually has a larger TA rating because it has 
more time to attract an audience. Figures shown in the 
chart represent average situations. In calculating homes 
per commercial minute A V is used with the actual num- 
ber of homes to indicate the likely audience to a COIT1 
mercial in the show. Note \ \ i-- average for ■■■ 



fOK AXXUSC VTUATIIM 

:'!■ :! ; l:.!lilliJIIII!:::llll!:: ,ii : PL ll:.,.:,!!::^!,.. 1 !!!, 



July 1959 



17 



famous on the local scene 




1 T\ 



IBG WSPD WJW WJBK 
'elphia Toledo Cleveland Detroit 

WAGA-TV WSPD -TV WJW-TV WJBK-T 

Atlanta Toledo ^^Gleveland Detroit 

I Sales Office: 625-Madison Ave., N.Y. 2i|'PLaza 1-3940 • 230 N. Michigai 



cbTX 



ret known throughout 
the nation 

The John Trumbull painting of the 

committee appointed to draw up 

the Declaration of Independence stands 

as a symbol of the strength and 

integrity of our forefathers. These 

characteristics are the wonderful 

heritage of Storcr Broadcasting, too. 

Strong and respected in the 

communities each Storer station serves, 

a Storer station is synonymous with 

broadcasting at its finest. 



£ 




' 



r 1 i 

I TIMEBUYING J 

L^J COVERAGE BASICS 

The distances covered by good quality tv signals 

|llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lll "■ ' ^l 11 '..!! 'Iil^ '^ :.!"■ ' :,. ' ' .,':■ ' ;i'- !!' ,|: r ir . :!'' - ,;r ,|||r ; l|' ' ' , li 1 ' !!;;■ !;■' ' ' in- :i'- .ill' .^.ll!'':;!'^;;!!!:'.,,, ;::.„!'■;!!'■ ,!'_^ 

How vhf coverages compares with uhf 




15,000 



15.000 



12,500- 



i. ' ■ ' - ■ ' ■ i '. ' ' . . ' ' ■ 

•:■:■:■:■:■;•:■:■"•: 

mm-- 

mm:: 



10,000- 



7,500- 



5,000- 



2,500- 



xxx-xx 

■mm 
y ^xm'' 

mm 
mm. 

*::::' 

:Ux:x 



m 



:■:•:■:■: 



:■:■:•] 

:■:■: 



ys/s?///:- 

::::■:::::: 

mm 

z * 



:::::::■:■. 

:::::::■:■:, 

..•.'.•.■.■..-.■. 



:■:*:■■/■: 

x u : : . 

■ : u xx. 



12.500 



1,500 



5,000 



ill 



T-l 



■z 
5 

:-x 



2,500 



LOW 

VHP 



HIGH 
VHF 



LOW 
UHF 



HIGH 
UHF 



Using material from Television Allocations Study Organization (TAS0), 
AMST chart shows that low-band vhf stations get out twice as far as high-band 
uhf outlets and cover, in terms of square miles, about five times as much territory 



^IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIl 



20 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 





news . . . 

with 

interest 



' 'For over a decade we have sponsored 
the World News Roundup on WRC Radio. 

The results have been most gratifying 
and are convincing evidence 

that 'The Sound of Quality' on WRC 
creates the believability and prestige 

which is so important in selling 
our savings and loan services to prospective customers." 
(signed) Edward Baltz, President, 
Perpetual Building Association, Washington, D.C. 

Further proof that the image of quality 

for your products and services 
is eniianced when you use 

the "Sound of Quality" on 



WRC 



NBC Owned 



980 in Washington, D. C. Sold by NBC Spot Sales 



r ' i 

L TIMEBUYING i 



Coverage basics 



The reach of radio station signals (during the day) 

iiiiiiiililiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!^ 

Radio station coverage in miles by power, frequency and ground conductivity 

(0.5 millivolt contour only) 





1500 


Kilocycles 
1000 


550 


1500 


Kilocycles 
1000 


550 


Ground 
conductivity 


250 watts 


500 watts 


Very poor 


7 miles 


10 miles 


20 miles 


9 miles 


12 miles 


23 miles 


Fair 


18 


27 


52 


20 


32 


62 


Excellent 


43 


63 


99 


50 


77 


122 




1,000 watts 


5,000 watts 


Very poor 


9 


14 


27 


14 


22 


40 


Fair 


24 


38 


73 


37 


58 


111 


Excellent 


60 


92 


143 


90 


140 


225 






10,000 watts 




50,000 watts 


Very poor 


19 


28 


51 


27 


40 


75 


Fair 


46 


72 


138 


68 


103 


190 


Excellent 


112 


170 


270 


150 


220 


340 



Ground conductivity of radio station signals 




iiiiiii: 

22 



How to read the numbers in the map above: 

0.5-2 means very poor ground conductivity 
4 means poor ground conductivity 



8 means -fair ground conductivity 
1 5 means good ground conductivity 
30 means excellent ground conductivity 



The reach of radio signals is determined primarily by power, position on the dial and ground conductivity. More power 
means greater reach. Lower frequencies mean more reach than higher frequencies. Some types of land, particularly 
flat, moist prairie land, help signals get more reach than other types of land. The 0.5 millivolt contour is the practical 
limit to usable daytime reception, though, under certain circumstances, a 0.1 millivolt contour can be used as the "outer 
ring" of signal coverage. With 30 meaning excellent ground conductivity, seawater conductivity is estimated at 5,000. 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



r 1 1 

I timebuying j Coverage basics 



Uhf stations are concentrated in the northeastern U. S. 



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i/> 


X 


z 


1— o 


£ 


<£ 




> 


CO 


UJ 


<1 


_j 


UJ 


UJ 


Q£r~ 


< 






!llllll!llll!l!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!li Ill lllllllllillllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllll 

This map was prepared for the Association of .Maximum Service Telecasters \<\ \. D. Ring & Associates, consulting radio 
ergineers. "Critical distance'' is defined as the average distance out to which "service oi consistently good quality" ma) be 
expected. This distance is in accordance with the findings of the T\ Allocations Stud) Organization, video industrj group 



JULY 1959 



23 




TIMEBUYER'S TOOLS 

The Daylight Saving Time picture in the top markets 

|ll!lllllllllll!llllllll!lllllllll!!llll!fl!lllll!IIIIIM 

How the top 100 metropolitan markets are affected by Daylight Saving Time changes 



1 


Market Winter 
rank time 


Summer 
time 


Hours 
MARKET 


behind 
EDST 


= 


49 


EST 


EDST 


Akron 





= 






I 


40 


EST 


EDST 


Albany-Schenectady-Troy . __ 





1 


51 


EST 


EDST 


Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton 





= 


20 


EST 


EST 


Atlanta 


1 


— 






== 


86 


EST 


EST 


Augusta 


1 


= 






= 


83 


PST 


PDST 


Bakersfield 


3 


= 


12 


EST 


EDST 


Baltimore 





= 







33 CST CST Birmingham 



M 6 EST EDST Boston 



35 EST EDST Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk 



1 60 CST CST Brownsville-Harlingen-McAllen 



1 14 EST EDST Buffalo 



73 EST EDST Canton 



1 68 EST EST Charleston, W. Va. 



1 99 EST EST 



Charlotte 



80 EST EST Chattanooga 



2 CST CDST Chicago 



17 EST EST Cincinnati 



1 11 EST EDST Cleveland 



1 100 EST EST Columbus, Ga. 



1 32 EST EST 



Columbus, Ohio 



94 CST CST Corpus Christi _ 



■ 21 CST CST 



Dallas 



= 88 CST CDST Davenport-Rock Island-Moline 1 



■ 44 EST EST Dayton 



1 26 MST MST Denver 



■ 92 CST CST Des Moines 



5 EST EST 



Detroit 



1 85 CST CDST Duluth-Superior 



■ 79 MST MST El Paso 



98 EST EDST Erie 



S 57 EST EDST Fall River-New Bedford 



m 65 EST EST Flint 



45 CST CST Fort Worth 



m 70 PST PDST Fresno 



I 66 EST EST Grand Rapids 



1 72 EST EDST Harrisburg 



M 30 EST EDST Hartford-New Britain 



E 52 HST HST Honolulu 



■ 15 CST CST 



Houston 



M 87 EST EST Huntington-Ashland _ 



M 31 EST EST 



Indianapolis 



m 55 EST EST 



Jacksonville 



■ m 78 EST EDST Johnstown 



1 18 CST CST 



Kansas City 



1 62 EST EST 



Knoxville 



m 96 EST EDST Lancaster 



97 CST CST Little Rock-North Little Rock 



m 3 PST PDST Los Angeles-Long Beach _ 



m 28 CST CDST Louisville 



1 



1 



Market Winter 
rank time 



Summer 
time 



MARKET 



Hours 



41 CST CST Memphis 



25 EST EST Miami 



16 CST CDST Milwaukee 



13 CST CDST Minneapolis-St. Paul 



82 CST CST 



Mobile 



63 CST CST 



Nashville 



34 EST EDST New Haven-Waterbury 



22 CST CST 



New Orleans 



1 EST EDST New York-N. E. New Jersey 



43 EST EST 



Norfolk-Portsmouth 



56 CST CST Oklahoma City 



53 CST CST 



Omaha 



81 CST CDST Pe 



4 EST EDST Philadelphia 



46 MST MST Phoenix 



8 EST EDST Pittsburgh 



23 PST PST Portland, Ore. 



75 EST EDST Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Beacon.. 



27 EST EDST Providence-Pawtucket 



90 EST EDST Reading 



61 EST EST 



Richmond 



42 EST EDST Rochester ___ 



54 PST PDST Sacramento 



67 MST MST Salt Lake City 



36 CST CST San Antonio 



29 PST PDST San Bernardino-Riverside-Ontario- 



19 PST PDST San Diego 



7 PST PDST San Francisco-Oakland 



47 PST PDST San Jose . 



93 EST EDST Scranton 



24 PST PST 



Seattle 



91 CST CST Shreveport 



95 CST CDST South Bend 



84 PST PST 



Spokane 



48 EST EDST Springfield-Holyoke 



9 CST CDST St. Louis 



58 EST EDST Syracuse 



76 PST PST Tacoma 



37 EST EST Tampa-St. Petersburg 



50 EST EST 



Toledo 



89 EST EDST Trenton 



74 CST CST 



Wichita 



59 EST EDST Wilkes-Barre— Hazleton 



69 EST EDST Wilmington 



38 EST EDST Worcester 



39 EST EDST Youngstown 



g| 'SOURCE: NBC Spot Sales, market rank estimated by "Sales Management." 1958. information as of April 1959 

fllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllll 



behind 
EDST 



2 1 



2 m 



71 


CST 


CST 


Tulsa 


2 


77 


EST 


EDST 


Utica-Rome 





10 


EST 


EDST 


Washington, D. C. 





64 


EST 


EDST 


Wheeling-Steubenville 






n l 



TIMEBUYING J Timebuyer's tools 



L TIMEBUYING J 



How to figure expiration and renewal dates fast 



0i|||||||||||l|||||||||||||||||||lilllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIW Illllllllllllliilllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll'lllllllllllllllllllll 



CALENDAR FOR RAPID CALCULATION OF EXPIRATIONS, RENEWALS 



STARTING DATE 



1958 S M T W 

Dec. 28 29 30 31 

1959 "4 " 5 ' "$ 7 
Jan. '$% 12 13 14 

^Wl9"2<F21 
25 26 27~28 
J_ 2 3 4 
8 9 10 11 



T f 



T 2"S 
8 9 10 

15J617 

22, 23 24 

29, 30 31 

5 6 7 



EXPIRATION OR RENEWAL DATE 



13 Weeks 



1959 S M T W T F S 



26 Weeks 



1959 - S . ft IW'f'F S" 



39 Weeks 



T^'»2jar75rn 
zs' 29 a a 1 2 3_ 

"1T6 7 '8 9 VoTT 
12 , 13 14 i 15TJM7 18 
1,920 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 ~l} 

TTTTT 7 
' ¥ 1 "11" 1 2 1TT4 

T Trrrs'T9iar 2 

J5~l4~S5~2€TT2 

"W3i~r 2 jT4 

j6 7 8, 9 10,1 Tig 
J3J4_15_16 "17 18 19 
20,21 22 23 24 25 28 
2728 29.30 ^F 
im 4 5 6 7 ; ■ 8 9 1 
, 11 1 2 13 14 IS 16 1 
18 19 2021 ,22232 
25 26 2728 29 30 31 
-L-2JL 4 JL'6_2 
,8, 910.11J2.13 14 
15.-16 17,18 1,9,20 |t| 
2223 24.25 26.27 M 
29,30 1 2 3 4~a 

„„6~7 8 9 10 11 1* 2 

1314 15 16 17 18 11 1 
20 21 22 23 24 2526] 
2,7 28 29 30 31, 1 "Sj 

3 4 S , 6 J_ 8~9j 
10.11 1,2,13 14 15 16; 
t7.T 8 19 20 21, 22 2 Jt ; 
24 25 26 27 28.29 30 
31 1 2 3 iim 4 5 

7 8 9 10 1 1 1 2 1 
J4. 15J6 17J8,19j 
2|„ 22 ,2,3 24 2 5 26 
28 29 J ljL.4, 
A-l-JL 91SL11 
UJ4JUL16JUJ8 
20„„21 22, 23 24,25 
2J.28 29;30 a t 1 

.,,,3, 4 ,,a 6 ,„„Z-a 

lflLlULi.13Jbt.15 

12 1 8 , 1 $ 20 at 22 
-Zi 25 .lft-??JBt29 
;1 2 3, 4 J, 6_2 

,j. 9 10,11 i&n W 
15J6J7.1 8 J9_20 2J 
2J,23 24 25 26. 27 28] 
2Jt.,30 31 1_2. 3 

J. 6 J 8 jjf 10 

B 13 W 15 H 17 M 

3 24 251 



1959 s m t vrrr 



1^2 3 24 25 26! 
27 28 29 30 "T 

~T "ST" 7"T_9 

"TrT2"Tf""i4"T"T 1 6 

18 19 20 21 g 23 

13> 26~gT ZSTZTlO 

~r 2T 4"T 6 
nr 9TirriTTi3 

1F16 17 18 19 20 
22,23 "24" 25 26 27" 
29 30~T 2~T 4 

~¥ 7~r 9iri"i 
T!ri4Trr6T?i8 

1960 "25"2'1 22 23"5?25 

Jan. 27 2 3"2~§ 30~gT 1 

3 4_5 "6J7. 8" 

10 11 12 13 14 15 

17,18 1.9 20 2,1, 22 
24,25 ££27 28 29 

Ffb 3X 1_1 3_4 5 

7 8 ,91 OH 12 

J4. 1 5 J6 "l 7 J8 1 9 

21,22 23 24,25 26 

Mar. 28_29_! 2 3 4 

JL 7 JL 9 l°- n 

13,14 IS ,16 17 18 
20,21 2223 24 25 
ApR - 27.28 2930 3J_ ' 
,„3 4_JJ 6__7 8 
10 11 12 13,14 15 
17, 18,1,9 20,2122 
24, 25 26 27 28 29 

JL 2 Ul 4"T^ 

8 9 JO 1 1 12 1 3 

" 15, 1 6 17J 8 19 20 
22 23^,25 26 27 

June 29 30 31 1 J2 3 
_ - -JL 6 _1 . 8_S_10 

JL2J3JJJ 5,Jt6 17 

___ ,1,9, 2 QJtt 2 _2 J 28_2 4 
J uly 2 6,27,28. 29 JQ 1 
,1 4 S 6 7 

J2.11 J2_13J4JL5 

1718 19 20 21,22 
24,25 26, 27 28 29 





52 Weeks 


1959 


t M f w T F 5 


Dec. 


20*2! 22 2 3 U 2 5 2? 


1960 


27 28 29 30 3f 1 T 


Jan. 


"'3' 4 ""5" 6 7 8 '# 



= Feb 



Mar , 
Apr. 



May 



Mar. ""7 
1 



15 1 6 X7J 8 
22 23 24 25 

2 IT" 4 

. 9 10 1 1 
T5~161T18 
g"23 24 25 
Apr." 29 30 31 1 

„S M 6, ,7 8 
J2J3JL4 is 

IS. 20 H22 

May 26 27 26,29 
5 



June 



July 




It 1 ;.l 3 

.,,7 8 9 10 

M ' 5 HI ' 7 

" 21, 22 23„ 24 

July 28 29 3JL 1 

JL 6 X 8 

12 13 14 15 



If 20 21 .22 

_J\UG. 26,27 28.29 
,. „ 2 3 ^4. 5 

__aiojjLi2 

16 17 18 19 



21.24 25_26 

Sep t. 30 3 1 „ 1 „ 2 

6. 7 ,8, 9 

13 14 1516 



20 n ,21 22 23 

22,28 29 30 

_Qcl JL 3^JL. 7 

1.1.12 ta.14 

i&ianui 

SL26J2L28 

Nov. 2 |„ 2 ,3 4 
~ 9 10 1 1 



8 



JI5J6J7J8 
-22 23 24.25 



-Dec. 29 M ,30_t 

-5. 1 JL 
LL4_[_ 

I 22.23 
Jan. ■28 29 30 




12 1 3 14 

19.20 21 
26 27 28 

JC 6 H 

12 13 14 

19 20 21, 

26 27 28 

2 3 „4 r 

_9.10 jy. 

JJJ 7 !! 
23,24 25„ 

35LAJL 
,7, 8 ,,9 
14 1 5 1,6, 
21...22 23 
H- 29 -M 

11 12 I 

18.19 2fi 
2S-26 22. 
-?_ 3 _4 

,9,10 n 

1,6,17 1,8 
23_24 2S 
y,3l j 

-§. 7 -l 

13L'4JS 

20.21 22 
2,?„28 29: 
JL 4 Jl 

ifiji ii 

1,718 1,9, 
24_25 26 
.1. 2 Ji A960 

„,s„ 9 m -i*M 

1SL16J1. 
Z2-23JS*- 
29_3QJil 

n s, 6 _2 

12 13 \£ 
It 20 ^ 
26,27 28 
Jl J JS. 

i0_1 1 12^ Mar. 
1Z.18 12. 

24.25 26. 
■ 1 ■ 



Aug 



Sept 



Oct. 



Nov. 



_D_ec ± 



Fee 



22 23 
2930 
, 5 6 
12 13 
19 20 
26 27 

,„3 J" 
10, 1 1 
17 18 
2425 
31 1 

7 8 
14 15 
21 22 

28 29 

JL 6 

12,13 
19,20 
26 27 
,.2, 3 
9}, 10 
J&17 
12.24 
.Jfi_31 
,„6 7 
13.14 
20_21 
27.28 
„,4 5 
il'2 
1,8 19 
2526 

_L 2 

8 9 

15, 1 6 

29 30 

JL 7 

,|,3 14 
2fiL 

22L28 

,3, 4 

10., 1 1 

,1,7, 1 8 
24 25 
|1 1 
JL 8 
1115 
1122 



Aug. 



24 25 26 27 28 JjJ^e 
3l' 1 2 3 '4:| July 

"7 stioy ' 

14 15 16J7lf 
21, 22 2 3 24 2J5, 
28 29 3 1 2 

5 6 7 8~~f 
,12 13 1 4 1518" 
19 20 2,1 22 23, 
26.27 28.29 30 

2 3 4 5 ~6] Sept 

_j^ro n_i2 13 
i£ ' 7 13L 1 q H§, 

23 24 25 26 27 

30 1 J. 3 J 

JL 8 110 U 
U 1 5 1.6 1 7 || 
21.22 23.24 25 
28 29 30 3 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



1 960 

Jan. 



Feb. 



„„4 5 ,6 7 8 

11 12 1,3 14 IS' 

18,19 20 21 22 
2S M 26 27 28 2 9 
.'. !.. 2 ,3, 4_S 
8 9 10 1 1 12 
15 16 1 7 18 19 
22,23 24 25 26 
29 30 1 2 ,3 
,„ 6 7 8 9 10 
|3 14 .15 16,17 

2^21 ,2^,23 2^ 

27., 28 29 30 31 

JL 4 JL 6 JL 
10 1 1 12 13 14 

17,18 19,20 21 
2;4„25 26 27 28 
_L2_3._4_s.mar 

J_-9J_111J_{- 

,1S. 16,12,18 1,9 

22 2321252- 

2 9 30 M, 1 ,2j Apr 

JL3JL 

12.13 1,4,15 M 

|,9„20^1„22 2J1 

26_27 2_129J» 

JL i ,A, 5 „ 6 May 

■..I '0.M, 12,13 

ill7l_J9i_j„ 

i&24i_i26 

t 2_3__4__ 
„| 9 
15 16 




Nov. 



Dec. 



May 



Sept.,21 2Q.30, 3i_L 2 
_4__5_6 7.. .8 9 
1.1, 1 - 13 14 15 1 6 
18 19 20 21 22 23 




Coevrfs* UAA, t »«4, krTHC KA1I AOe«T, 



To calculate expiration date: Under starting date, use the day of the hroadcast thai ends the first week's cycle of your 
schedule. The date of final hroadcast will be the same day of the week, on the same horizontal line under 13, 26, 39 or 52 weeks 

To calculate renewal date: Under starting date, use the day of the hroadcast that begin- the second week's cycle of Mmr 

schedule. The renewal date will be the same day of the week, on the same horizontal line under either 13. 26. 39 or 52 weeks 

The above calendai i- published courtesy of The Katz Agency, Inc.. New York (it\ 



^!l!!l!!lllli!lll!li!lill!!l!!lllll!!!H 
july 1959 



llllll!lllllllllllllllll!l!l!llllli||||||||l!l!llll!!!l!ii!l!lllll!!!lllllllllllllll!llllllllllllllllll!l!IH^ 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 
25 



r ' i 

I TIMEBUYING 1 



Timebuyer's tools 



How network show buyers can figure out what part of the U. S. 
is in darkness (or not in darkness) when their program is aired 



Sunset lines by months of the year 

r\ frr*-"-^ APR 





JANUARY (r NOVEMBER 








These NBC maps show what part of the country is 
in darkness at the start of and during your network pro- 
gram for each month of the year, based on New York 
Standard Time. For example: If your program starts 
at 8 p.m., N.Y.T., in April all stations to the east of the 
8 p.m. line are in darkness. As the program progresses 
the sunset line moves westward. During Daylight Saving 
Time use the 7 p.m. line for your 8 o'clock program 



Pfil 



26 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



1 

WEBUYI 

" COST BASICS 

How to figure the cost of a spot radio campaign 

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

A. Cost per minute announcement for spot radio campaigns in 150 markets or less 



No. of markets 



(Based on a weekday schedule of 12 one-minute announcements per week lor 13 weeks) 

Daytime Evening 



Early morning- 
late afternoon 



► . How to calculate spot radio costs for campaigns of various lengths 

SPOT RADIO ESTIMATING FORMULA 

(Based on one-minute announcement rates — 100% =one-time daytime rate) 

COST PER ANNOUNCEMENT 



One-time rate 
Daytime 



1st 10 markets 


$ 697.56 


$ 578.68 


$ 501.68 


$ 798.00 


1st 20 markets 


1,093.01 


916.50 


836.00 


1,249.50 


1st 30 markets 


1,468.19 


1,239.05 


1,124.55 


1.657.75 


1st 40 markets 


1,713.76 


1,445.55 


1,254.55 


1,947.50 


1st 50 markets 


1,962.94 


1,664.38 


1,437.38 


2,225.50 


1st 60 markets 


2,146.87 


1,816.23 


1,569.13 


2,427.50 


1st 70 markets 


2,287.20 


1,930.86 


1,671.51 


2,595.00 


1st 80 markets 


2,421.06 


2,052.91 


1,773.91 


2,755.50 


1st 90 markets 


2,520.28 


2,141.78 


1,847.28 


2,880.70 


1st 100 markets 


2,626.34 


2,243.19 


1,943.04 


3,017.40 


1st 110 markets 


2,719.94 


2,331.69 


2,017.19 


3,132.90 


1st 120 markets 


2,809.29 


2,415.80 


2,084.26 


3,242.65 


1st 130 markets 


2,900.32 


2,494.58 


2,161.29 


3,361.15 


1st 140 markets 


2,980.02 


2,568.93 


2,206.89 


3,464.65 


1st 150 markets 


3,060.67 


2,634.29 


2,272.25 


3,564.65 



One-time rate 


Daytime 
100% 


Early morning-late afternoon 
111% 


Evening 
92% 


1 2 anncts. per week 


13 weeks 


75% 


88% 


66% 


26 weeks 


71 


83 


62 


39 weeks 


70 


82 


62 


52 weeks 


69 


80 


60 


24 anncts. per week 


13 weeks 


64% 


78% 


56% 


26 weeks 


62 


75 


54 


39 weeks 


02 


75 


54 


52 weeks 


61 


73 


53 



:! 



m 



The dollar figures above were put together by the Katz Agency. 
Rates, from November 1958 SRDS, are based on the use of one 
station in each market. The market list is ranked in order of the 
largest daytime weekly circulation shown by NCS No. 2. Early 
morning-late afternoon column is the average of rates between 7 & 
9 a.m. and 4 & 6 p.m. Daytime refers to the rate in effect for most 
hours between 6 and 11 p.m. Estimating formula shows percent- 
ages for calculating 12- and 24-announcement campaigns of various 
lengths compared with the one-time daytime rate (the right-hand 



column in the top chart). In other words the one-time daytime 
rate is used as an index of 100 and costs of other campaigns arc 
shown in relation to it. Example: The top 10 markets cost $798 
for 13 weeka of 12 one-minute announcements per market. \ ' 
announcement weekl) campaign al night for 52 weeks woul 

'l that or $478.80. These figures cover minute announcements 
only. Costs cover plans offered bj stations ex< 'hat run-of- 
schedule and "fixed but preemptible" discounts are not counted in 
prime time (except where t In > clearly applj to prime time). 



July 1959 



27 



r ' 1 

TIMEBUYING J Cost basics 



I TIMEBUYING J 



How to figure the cost of a spot tv campaign 

fiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Cost per announcement for spot tv campaigns in 150 markets or less 



MARKETS 



1st 10 Markets 



1st 20 Markets 



1st 30 Markets 



1st 40 Markets 



1st 50 Markets 



1st 60 Markets 



1st 70 Markets 



1st 80 Markets 



1st 90 Markets 



1st 100 Markets 



1st 110 Markets 



1st 120 Markets 



1st 130 Markets 



1st 140 Markets 



NIGHTTIME RATES 

20-Second announcement 

1 Time 260 Times 



$ 8.180.00 


$ 7,167.00 


11,510.00 


9,990.50 


13,875.00 


11,963.00 


16,095.00 


13,904.50 


18,235.00 


15,641.13 


20,015.00 


17,066.38 


21,710.00 


18,466.53 


22,875.00 


19,362.28 


21,075.00 


20,314.03 


24,925.25 


20,934.91 


25,935.25 


21,736.16 


26,850.25 


22,444.66 


27,580.25 


22,997.66 


28,284.00 


23,538.54 



1st 150 Markets | 29,141.00 24,185.29 



DAYTIME RATES 
1 -Minute announcement 

Maximum discount 
1 Time including plans 



$ 2,632.50 


$ 1,199.99 


3,762.50 


1,654.79 


4,747.50 


2,174.89 


5,582.50 


2,671.39 


6,385.00 


3,075.49 


7,075.00 


3,390.89 


7,712.00 


3,704.59 


8,162.00 


3,969.47 


8,642.00 


4,252.85 


9,049.10 


4,474.34 


9,468.10 


4,710.51 


9,878.10 


4,934.37 


10,255.10 


5,162.72 


10,598.35 


5,362.83 



10,974.35 



5,574.93 



LATE NICHT RATES 
1 -Minute announcement 

Maximum discount 
1 Time including plans 



$ 5,055.00 


$ 2.862.50 


6,560.00 


3,782.65 


7,680.00 


4,432.50 


8,630.00 


4,953.50 


9,545.50 


5,469.10 


10,325.50 


5,910.85 


10,988.50 


6,276.40 


11,518.50 


6,573.40 


11,998.50 


6,851.78 


12,415.50 


7,084.85 


12,932.00 


7,371.89 


13,374.50 


7,648.33 


13,751.50 


7,876.68 


14,119.75 


8,097.46 



14,520.75 



8,325.06 



tSa Formulas for estimating spot i\ budgets 

Part of a regular survey of spot tv 

costs by the Katz Agency, the dollar FREQUENCY mscouNTS 

figures at top are based on one station 



13 Times 26 Times 52 Times 104 Times 156 Times 260 Times 



per market. Highest rates per market Nighttime (20 sec.) 1% 3 % 



6%% 



8% 



10 % 



11%% 



5%% 



12 % 14% 16%% 



18%% 



WEEKLY PLANS 

Average Discount From Open Rate — Daytime 

Minute/20-second announcements 



are used for the one-time figures along Daytime (minutes) 1% 

with the discount prices on the same 
station. Rates are per SRDS, March 
1959. To calculate costs for more than 
one announcement, two formulas are 
shown below the dollar figures. The 
frequency discount figures are based 
on total units used within a contract 
year, the weekly plan figures for units 
used within a week. Shown at bottom 
are ratios comparing daytime and late 
night announcements with nighttime 
announcements (index: 100) and com- 
paring 20- and 10-second announce- 
ments both night and day with min- Nighttime: 
utes (index: 100). 



Il!llllllllllllll!llllllllllll!ll!lllliilllillll!ilill!llli;i;ilillll!!ill!lliiiilllllllllliliillliy 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 





1 Week 


13 Weeks 


26 Weeks 


52 Weeks 


6 announcements per week 


22 % 


24%% 


28 % 


32 % 


12 announcements per week 


42 % 


44 


% 


45%% 


47%% 


ID's 


15 ID's per week 


49%% 


51 


% 


52%% 


54 % 


V^ ■ Announcement 


cost ratios 






Nighttime 


Daytime 


Nighttime: 100% 


Minute: 






loiy; 


100% 


Daytime: 32 


20-seconds 






95 


93 


Late night: 36 


10-seconds: 






48 


47 







r 1 1 

L TIMEBUYING J 



TIMEBUYING TIPS 



8 tips for timebuyers on the use of ratings information 



1. Use total area ratings 
instead of metro area 
ratings. 

ANALYSIS: In this chart, Station "A," 
with more coverage, gets bigger total 
audience even though it gets a smaller 
percent of homes in its area than Sta- 
tion "B" is able to capture in its area 



IllllinillllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 



Households reached in total station area 51,000 





STATION "A" 


STATION "B" 




Tv households in metro area 


100,000 


100,000 




Metro area rating 


20.0 


25.0 




Households reached in metro area 


20,000 


25,000 




Tv households in total station area 


300,000 


200,000 




Total station area rating 


17.0 


23.0 





46,000 



^iiiiii!iiii!iiii!!ii[iiii!i|[|iii!ii!iiii!!iiii!iiiii ,.^:ii: ,:ji: ■■ :.!;i: .ii: . .: ,:;.. ;i:i. :ii:i:: ..,,ii. .im .,h ; ,,: ii,:: . : : i , : .. .. : : 1 1 i i ;;u 1 1 ii i in .■: ; [!;!ii]i 1 i!iiiii:::;[iiiinii[Hi'iii!i[ 



2. Don't buy on basis 
of the rating points only, 
Meet the coverage and 
frequency objectives of 
the campaign. 

ANALYSIS: Schedule I is 10 partici- 
pations in two daytime strips. Schedule 
II is 5 participations in same strips plus 
5 in late movie. Scattering buys results 
in more coverage but less frequency per 
home. Best buy depends on ad objectives 



3. Make 
audience 
the product. 



sure that 
is right 



the 
for 



ANALYSIS: Though female audience 
is equal in size for all three shows, age 
composition varies considerably. Quiz 
show is best for client after older 
women, comedy is right for client after 
the household with the young housewife 



4. Use current ratings 
data for relative shares 
of audience, but use the 
estimates of sets-in-use 
for the actual period of 
the campaign. 

ANALYSIS: By using older ratings, 
buyer can judge correctly that 8 p.m. 
spot will lose more audience from hot 
weather drop-off, so that spot "B" is 
really the better buy for an advertiser 





SCHEDULE 1 


SCHEDULE II 


TOTAL RATING POINTS 


1 week 


82.0 


78.0 


4 weeks 


328.0 


312.0 


CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE 


1 week 


25% 


40% 


4 weeks 


40 


(.0 



Average frequency of exposure 
per household reached 



8.2 



i.2 



50 years and over 



43.7 



30.9 



23.5 





QUIZ 
SHOW 


VARIETY 
SHOW 


SITUATION 
COMEDY 


U.S. Rating 


29.5 


29.1 


28.9 


Women viewers per set 


1.05 


1.05 


1 .03 


RATINGS BY AGE OF HOUSEWIFE 


16-34 years 


18..i 


29.8 


35.7 


35-49 years 


28.1 


2<).(, 


30.3 



^^.liiii:!..,,;!!:::' ■.. !..i!iii!i;::;; :. .;;::;:■ . ...ih:!: :" ..in 1 ...: ;..: ■ ...:.■ .::,,i;. ...::;;■ :.:i:,. .:,:;;; :;ii;iM;:;iiMJJ ; ;: ii::;i,,,: ; .. MiiiiiitiiiiiuJiMiiiiijiiiM 

pilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli 

Example: Buying in March, latest report from January, April-June campaign 



i 




If 
sets- 


January 1958 
n-use are used 




If average 
sets-in- 


Apr 
use 


l-June 1957 
arc used 


n 


Spot "A" 

<8 p.m. 

Thursday) 


Spot "B" 
(10 p.m. 
Monday) 




Spot "A" 

18 p.m. 
Thursday) 




Spot "B 
110 p.m. 
Monday) 




Sets-in-use 


62.0 


65.0 




.">().() 




64.0 


| 


Share 


l.V, 


12', 




I.",', 




12', 


1 Rating 28.0 27.0 22.5 26.9 

liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii, i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiraiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii imuiiiii 

SOURCE: Charts arc from ISihI Shcrak, v. p., research director, KttS. Analysis Is SPONSOR'S. 



July 1959 



2 <> 



r ] i 

I TIMEBUYING J 



Timebuying tips 



8 tips for timebuyers (Cont'd) 



5. Watch the trends as 
new competition conies 
to the fore. 

ANALYSIS: New program competition 
affects not only rating of continuing 
show but audience composition, too. 
In this example, continuing show lost 
many of its young housewives (16-34) 



6. Don't always judge a 
program by its initial 
rating. 

ANALYSIS: Opinions differ as to how- 
soon admen can tell how well a show 
will do, but as these figures show, two 
months can make a whale of a differ- 
ence in the ratings of a network show 



7. Study the seasonal 
variation in sets-in-use by 
time of day. 

ANALYSIS: This example covers a 
parent company with two tv properties. 
Product, with slight sales peak in sum- 
mer, can be used only in one. Though 
properties are equal on year-round 
basis, later time period for program "B" 
gives it the edge because it is affected 
less by hot weather dip in viewing 



8. Watch for variations 
in the urban and rural 
audiences. 



1954 



1955 



1956 



1957 



Show's rating — all households 



32.3 



27.1 



26.6 



23.3 



By age of housewife 



16-34 vears 



31.0 



25.4 



21.4 



19.4 



35-49 years 



30.7 



30.2 



25.1 



23.0 



50 years and over 



21.4 



30.7 



31.9 



28.4 



Share of audience 



47.0 



43.8 



40.0 



34.8 



Major competition 



variety 



variety adventure western 



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Rating 



Share 



OCTOBER (WK. 2) 



NOVEMBER 



15.9 


25.1 




19.9 


30.9 




21.9 


32.8 




20.0 


31.5 




25.8 


37.1 




26.2 


36.8 




26.3 


37.8 




25.3 


41.6 




27.9 


39.8 





DECEMBER 



iiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Year-round 
averages 
Average sets-in-use 
Average share 
Average rating 
Average sets-in-use 

January 

February 

March 

April 



May 

June 

July _ 

August 

September 
October .... 
November 
December 



Program "A" 
8-8:30 p.m. 

58.3 
40% 
23.3 

69.1 

71.9 

68.5 

66.8 

54.1 

47.1 

40.2 

39.7 .. 

50.2 

60.6 

64.5 

66.-9 



Program "B" 
10-10:30 p.m. 

57.7 
40% 
23.1 

... 63.8 

... 64.5 

- 61.4 

... 60.3 

... 58.4 

... 545 

... 502 

... 511 

... 51.7 

... 55.1 

... 58.8 

... 63.0 



Tllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliillllllllllll^ 

lillllllllll!!ll!llllllllllllll!!l!llllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



ANALYSIS 

by the Nielsen 
homes-reached 
erable to a 
divided among 
Schedule "A" 
"A" counties, 
light audience 
ties, which are 



Two schedules, reported 
Co., show how a smaller 
audience might be pref- 
larger audience evenly- 
the various county sizes, 
gets a heavy audience in 
which are urban and a 
in the "C" and "D" coun- 
the rural and farm areas 



n 


County size 


Homes reached 
Schedule A 


Schedule B 


1 


"A" COUNTIES 


40% 


25% 


j= 


"B" COUNTIES 


31 


30 


11 


"C" COUNTIES 


15 


21 


1 


"D" COUNTIES 


14 


24 


= 


TOTAL U.S. 


3.9 million 


4.2 million 



BIII1I1IIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIW 

Source: Charts are from Bud Sherak, v.p., research director, K&E, except for No. 8, which Is from A. C. 
Nielsen Co. Analysis is SPONSOR'S. 



30 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



1 

4EBUYII 

" AUDIENCE BASICS 

How to find share of population segment reached 

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiii 

Distribution of population corresponding to NTI-NRI sample 



ALL AGES 
MILLIONS 



4 YEARS & OVER 



MILLIONS 



UNDER 4 YRS 



4 TO 11 



12 TO 17 



FEMALES 
18 & OVER 



MALES 
18 & OVER 



16 

30 
16 

58 


9 

17 

9 

33 


158 
30 

16 

58 


54 


32 


54 



Population by millions in relation to total homes 




Richard Dunne, marketing and media coordinator for 
SSCB, prepared the above chart to help the agency's re- 
searchers in calculating an important but seldom available 
statistic. Audience composition figures commonly show the 
percent of men, women and children in the audience to a 
specific time period or program. Or, these figures may show 
the actual number of eacli population segment reached. But 



they do not show the percent of all men, women, etc.. in 
iln 1 . S. — a useful marketing measure. In the chart above, 
Dunne took population figures as of 1 July 1958 and broke 
them down into the four population categories tallied 
by Nielsen. Figures at top show this breakdown with 
and without children under four. Nielsen audienc com- 
position figures do not include this youngest age group. 



llllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllilllllllllilllllllll^ 



July 1959 



31 



1 



timebuying J Audience basics 



There's more to network programing than a rating 



SOME EXAMPLES OF PULSE NETWORK TV QUALITATIVE DATA 



A. Top 10 shows and the market for hair products 



Top 10 



No. 



Rating 



Of Female Viewers 

13 & Over. 
Per 100 Homes 



% Of Females Who Bought 



Hair 
Shampoo 



Home 
Permanent 



Hair 
Spray 





Norm 127 


51% 


10% 


15% 


Gunsmoke 


33.3 


100 


76 


16 


24 


Perry Como 


32.2 


107 


63 


19 


19 


Wagon Train 


32.0 


103 


49 


11 


14 


Maverick 


29.2 


87 


47 


10 


11 


Danny Thomas 


28.3 


105 


53 


12 


17 


Playhouse 90 


28.0 


96 


54 


11 


20 


Loretta Young 


27.5 


99 


53 


10 


11 


Have Gun, Will Travel 


27.1 


104 


54 


12 


16 


Rifleman 


26.5 


100 


50 


14 


16 


Alfred Hitchcock 


26.2 


99 


47 


8 


10 



!. How viewers of Sterling Drug's show spend their money 

WEEKLY EXPENDITURES FOR DRUGS, TOILETRIES AND COSMETICS 



Program 



Rating 



None 



Under $3 



$3 And 
Over 







Norm 


26.9% 


29.0% 


44.3% 


Detective's Diary 


5.0 




22.9 


31.6 


45.5 


Saber of London 


7.2 




27.4 


32.2 


40.4 


True Story 


5.8 




23.9 


35.3 


40.8 


Restless Gun 


24.1 




28.4 


26.5 


45.1 


As The World Turns 


8.2 




26.0 


28.3 


45.7 


County Fair 


5.9 




22.4 


30.1 


47.5 


Edge of Night 


7.1 




28.4 


26.7 


44.9 


Price Is Right (Daytime) 


10.3 




21.4 


30.7 


47.9 


Queen For A Day 


7.3 




19.9 


32.9 


47.2 


Today Is Ours 


3.9 




28. 7 


33.4 


37.9 


Treasure Hunt 


7.7 




28.4 


29.8 


41.8 



C« Smoking habits of viewers to Brown & Williamson shows 



Program 


Rating 






% non-smc 


kers 


% smokers 






Norm 


29% 






71% 


County Music Jubilee 


6.0 






32 




68 


Queen For A Day 


7.9 






30 




70 


Top Dollar 


14.1 






26 




74 


Undercurrent 


20.2 






25 




75 


It Could Be You 


6.1 






17 




83 



SOURCE: Above studies all come from monthly Pulse network tv reports. Hair products chart is from Spring 1959, Sterling Drug chart is from winter 1959, 
Brown & Williamson chart is from summer 1958. 

illllll 



lis 



32 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



In the first six months of 1959, WMAQ Radio's local sales were 33.6% ahead 
of the same period last year. And the month of June not only proved to be 
57.3% greater than June of last year, but the biggest month in WMAQ's entire 
37-year history! Big talk like this is possible because WMAQ Radio gets 
action for its advertisers . . . buying action from Chicago's adult audiences. For 
your authoritative voice in Chicago, talk big on . . . % a m iy m yt ^-^ 
NBC Owned 670 in Chicago Sold by NBC Spot Sales VV IVl/-\v>£ 








talk! 








V 




THE AREA STATION FOR SHARP TIME BUYERS* 

THE STATION ASSIGNED THE NEW TRIPLE AAA BROADCAS 
OF THE HOUSTON BUFF BASEBALL GAMES 

IOUSTON, TEXAS • 50,000 WATTS • 740 KILOCYCL 
epresented Nationally by PETERS, GRIFFIN, WOODWARD, INC. *See ANY Area Sur 



mm 





Facts & Figures: Here 

are the in- and out-of-home 
and the cumulative audiences 
to radio. Also covered are 
spending data, some network 

facts and radio's dimensions 

Stations & Reps: Here 

is a list of both am and fm 
stations in major and medium 
markets with their national 
representatives compiled for 
the timehuver's convenience 





Enclosed is my check for $ 

□ Enclosed is Company Purchase Order 

Name 



Company *One copy at $1.25 to IRE members, domestic and for- 

" eign. $3.00 to non-members; $2.40 to public libraries, 

Address colleges and subscription agencies; postage prepaid to 

~ ~ 7~] U. S. and Canada; 25c additional per copy to other 

Clf y S J*1 countries. 



Only a few 

i 
of the IRE 

special issues 

are Still available Each issue of PROCEEDINGS of the ire 

is the result of the most advanced thinking in the field of radio-electronics. 

Based on exacting research, and written by men who are foremost in their specialty, 

these issues are invaluable works of reference. This is also material not available 

from any other source. As the official publication of The Institute of Radio Engineers, 

PROCEEDINGS presents the years-ahead ideas on which new advances are based. 

These history-making issues, originally over-printed for reserves are rapidly 

being exhausted and will not be reprinted. 

YOU CAN STILL GET: 

VERY low FREQUENCY, June, 1957 — New research in the very 

low frequency band, below 30 kc, opens up greater portions of the radio spectrum 

for communication purposes. VLF has many new and important uses. A reference work 

you'll need for years. 

SINGLE SIDEBAND, December, 1956 — A round-up of recent tech- 
nical discoveries as presented by the Joint Technical Advisory Committee through its 
sub committee on Single Sideband techniques. This special study for the FCC points 

up the many advantages of single sideband. 

FERRITES, October, 1956 — This new group of solid state materials 
outmodes the intermittent "pulse" system of World War II radar. The ferrites 
allow simultaneous sending and receiving on a single microwave antenna; as well as full- 
power transmission in microwave ranges with reduced power loss and interference. 

SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS, December, 1955 — This issue 

heralds the arrival of a new epoch in radio electronics — the solid state electronics era. 

Defined and named with the birth of the transistor, this concerns the control and 

utilization of the electric magnetic and photic properties of solids. There are now 

whole new classes of electronic devices due to discoveries in this field. 

SCATTER PROPAGATION, October, 1955 — Here's radio history 

in the making. This issue presents practical application of a new principle in the 

fields of broadcasting and electronics. Thirty-five papers lay the foundation 

of a new means of communicating over long distances. 

The Institute of Radio Engineers 

1 East 79th Street, New York 21, N. Y. 

Please send me the following issues of PROCEEDINGS OF THE IRE: 



36 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



r2 1 

RADIO I 



RADIO BASICS 



INDEX 



JSTENING HABITS 



Radio's hourly audience, winter and summer, local and N.Y. time.... page 38 

Daily hours radio usage by months; three radio trends page 40 

Listening by region, county size, day part; audience composition.... page 42 



9UT-0F-H0ME LISTENING 



Winter and summer listening, by day parts; peak auto audiences page 44 

Auto radio facts; where out-of-home listening takes place page 46 

How out-of-home compares to in-home listening page 48 

Six-year out-of-home listening trends in 28 markets page 50 



SPOT RADIO'S CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE 



Typical station totals daily and weekly, also by day parts page 52 

How station audiences rise in a month; how to boost cume totals page 54 

SPENDING AND COSTS 

What advertisers spend in radio; how spot rates have changed page 56 

Leading spot spenders, 1958 and 1959; spot spending by category., page 58 

Radio billings of top 50 air agencies; top spot, web agencies page 60 

NETWORK PATTERNS 

Most popular show lengths among clients, top 10 shows, etc page 62 

DIMENSIONS 

Radio saturation — total U.S., by regions and county size page 64 

Number of sets, number of stations, set locations, etc page 66 

SET PRODUCTION 

Set production by years, total U.S.; set production by type of set page 68 

U.S. radio stations and their national reps . . . page 70 

illy 1959 37 




LISTENING HABITS 



Radio's hour-by-hour in-home audience winter and summer 



A. The hour-by-hour picture for spot advertisers 





SUMMER 1958 


6- 7 am 


3,622 


7- 8 


6,020 


8- 9 


6,362 


9-10 


6,362 


10-11 


6,313 


11-12 n 


6,118 


12- 1 pm 


6,705 


1- 2 


5,775 


2- 3 


5,188 


3- 4 


4,845 


4- 5 


4,405 


5- 6 


4,894 


6- 7 pm 


4,502 


7- 8 


3,230 


8- 9 


2,741 


9-10 


2,790 


10-11 


2,692 


11-12 m 


1,909 



MON. 
FRI. 



SUN. 
SAT. 





WINTER 1959 


6- 7 am 


4,945 


7- 8 


9,593 


8- 9 


9,148 


9-10 


7,665 


10-11 


6,478 


11-12 n 


6,132 


12- 1 pm 


6,725 


1- 2 


5,143 


2- 3 


4,599 


3- 4 


4,401 


4- 5 


4,500 


5- 6 


5,192 


6- 7 pm 


4,302 


7- 8 


2,918 


8- 9 


2,473 


9-10 


2,423 


10-11 


2,423 


11-12 m 


1,929 



MON. 
FRI. 



SUN.- 
SAT. 



These national Nielsen figures adjusted by time zone provide local time figures in terms of thousands of 
homes per average minute. The summer data is for July-August, the winter figures are January-February. 



>. The hour-by-hour picture for network advertisers 



AUGUST 
1958 











































































































































































































6.215 


6,069 




-6^569 


























6 677 








5,334 














5,334 






1 1 
















4,111 




















4,454 




3,915 








































3,230 


3,083 


3 034 






2.055 


































2.349 









































9 10 II 12 I J 3 4 5 6 7 B 9 10 



38 



JANUARY 
1959 





















































































































8,308 


7,961 








































































(>e?fi 


6,626 












6,429 












































5,489 


5,044 






1 
47Q7 
































4,451 






3,709 










2,918 




























3,165 


5>7?n 










































XS74 







































NEW YORK TIME 



- MONDAY THRU FRIDAY - 



EVENING 
-SUN0AY THRU SATUR0AY- 



Figures in the graphs above are in thousands of homes per average minute. Each hour is current New 
York time. Note the summer in-home peak is around lunch time while the winter peak is around breakfast time. 

^ ! ! ' ' : 1 1 1 j i . ; : : .: 1 1 : : ; . , 1 1 1 1 : . . ; 1 1 1 ' . 1 1 1 1 : . . 1 1 i ■ ■ 1 1 r . : , i i ! , : i : : ■ : . i u j . . : 1 1 i ' ■ . 1 1 1 1 ■ . , 1 1 1 1 ■ . . i i i 1 1 ; : ; i m . , 1 1 m ;^ ; : i 1 1 m : .■ ; ^' i i u ' ^ r 1 1 1 J J f i i i J J i : f 1 1 J 1 1 f 1 1 ! u ^f i i u ) ; 1 1 1 1 .^m 1 1 1 J fT 1 11 1 1 . 1 1 J , 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 ! i ; I N j I ] ! 1 1 1 1 J : M 1 1 lv 1 1 1 ' j . 1 1 m i = 1 1 1 1 j > : 1 1 1 j j , 1 1 1 j - m i m j j . 1 1 1 1 : i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



AIR MEDIA BASIC 



INHIII I 

■ 



Hoosiers Are "Sold" On 
The Good Buy That Says Hello! 



_T_ 



T 



_v_ 



jfa; 4 




~rn 



Indianapolis 



In Just Four Months, Over Fifty Thousand People Made It A Point To 
Visit 'The Traveler" WXLW INDIANAPOLIS RADIO-MOBILITY 



Here's the secret to increasing your sales in this area 
through the wide public appeal and acceptance of 
RADIO-MOBILITY from WXLW, the only radio sta- 
tion in Central Indiana that takes its programming right 
to its listeners! Since WXLWs "Traveler" swung into 
operation a few short months ago, thousands of people 
flocked to see this 60-foot-long complete radio station on 
wheels, that visited every major shopping center in Cen- 
tral Indiana. This new concept in radio brings added 
impact to your announcements with on-the-spot broad- 
casting of regular programs, interviews, and special 
events, from the number one station in the market. 

St to feature true hi-fidelity sound. 

f St to feature live on-the-spot news coverage. 

0St to offer on-the-air editorials. 

i St to offer adult programming. 

i$t with RADIO-MOBILITY! 

Send your sales messages along on these good-will tours, 
and enjoy the benefits only personal appearances can give 
. . . product loyalty through station loyalty . . . and capture 
more of the Indianapolis audience. Put your product 
where Hoosiers are "sold", on the good buy that says hello 
—WXLW! 



930 ON YOUR DIAL 




RADIO INDIANAPOLIS 
3,000 WATTS DAYTIME 



Dial 

35D 





:v 










The Traveler's completely equipped 
studio 




Interviews are conducted in The 
Traveler's modern lounge 





h 


- 



Dozens of advertisers utilize the 

Traveler's merchandising display 

windows 



CONTACT YOUR NEAREST JOHN E. PEARSON REPRESENTATIVE 

iuly 1959 39 




Listening habits 



In-home radio listening level shows little change through year 

pilllllllll i in i ii illinium minimum! .- ,:i!- ii in ;:!' ^m ;: ;iii. ' - ■!.:"!■ ;; mm !■, in;: :;■ u- .;. : n; . :,. : l. . ■!■ . ;, . iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiimiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii nillllil 

Average daily hours listening per home by months of the year 



2.5 





























2.5 
?0 




























1.92 


1.90 


1.97 


1 1 

1.88 


i 1 

1 81 


i 


1.98 


1.93 


1.90 


1 8? 


1.92 


1.85 


1.5 












i.rH 














I.U 


























0.5 




























MAR. 


APR. 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUG. 


SEPT. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 



2.0 m 



1.5 



1.0 



0.5 



Source: NTH. 1958-59. 



illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllM 

iiuuiiiiuuiiuuiiiiiimiimiiiiummiuiiimuiiumiiiuiiiunimiiuiiinmiiuimum 
A. Daily in-home listening hours have leveled off 



Some radio 
listening trends 
in recent years 
and comparisons 
with a decade ago 



Year 
















Average hrs. 
per home 


1954 
















2.7 




















1956 
















2.3 
















1958 
















1.9 
















1959 
















1.9 








. Listening 

Market 


level 


in 


morning is same as 

Percent homes listening c 
1948 


a decade ago 

uring morning 
1958 


New York .. 






17.1% 










15.7% 










Philadelphia 






14.2 










15.4 








Boston 






16.5 










17.5 


Cleveland 






14.4 










12.3 


Dallas 






16.0 










15.6 



C. Videotown study shows housewives love radio 

Average Hours oj Listening Monday Thru Friday* 



Three charts at right nail down some key 
trends in radio listening. Top chart is 
from Nielsen, shows daily listening hours 
per home during the January-February 
period each year. The second chart is 
based on Hooper data. Since there are 
more homes in these markets than 10 years 
ago total number of homes listening in 
1958 is larger than the percentage figures 
indicate. The third and bottom chart comes 
from Cunningham & Walsh's annual study 

40 





AM people 
1958 


1957 


H 

1958 


ausewives 

1957 


Morning 


1.45 


1.25 


5.80 


2.78 


Afternoon 


.50 


.57 


1.30 


1.12 


Evening 


.50 


.89 


.80 


1.01 


All Day 


2.45 


2.71 


7.90 


4.91 



•Five day (weekdays) total per average person. 

iiiuiiumiiiuiiii i iii/ : i ',:'::'':; :i: i : :i: i: ii ..:■., : :: : : .:' i. 'i ;r ::': i,':' : luuiimiiui miiiuimii!iiil| 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 





...but new and exciting every day! 



WSGN 



zoomed into first 
place almost three years ago. Today, it's 
the same story — rating-wise — but the 
excitement ot personality program- 
ming, instant, accurate news coverage, 
and sparkling promotions daily keep 
WSGN consistently in first place. 



N, 



ielsen told the WSGN success story 
first, and Hooper began telling the 
WSGN leadership trend in 1957. The 
April-May 1959 Hooper places WSGN 
head and shoulders above all other full- 
time stations. Pulse 1959 confirms the 
WSGN /Jrrf-with-the-finest storv. 



■wards tell why WSGN enjoys un- 
disputed popularity in the Birmingham 



market. For two consecutive years, WSGN 
has won Birmingham Ad Club awards 
tor the best musical disc jockey, best 

public service, and the best station pro- 
motion. WSGN holds the 1959 UPI 
certificate of merit and sixteen other 
major awards. 



X romotion is tops at WSGN, with 
genuine excitement created daily by the 
Miss Universe contest, Radio Press, The 
Big Sound, Pacemaker jingles, News 
Hawk coverage of local happenings and 
on-the-air interviews with such celebri- 
ties as Casey Stengel, Kay Anthony, 
Liberace, George Montgomery, Dear 
Abb\', Roberta Sherwood, Tama Elg, 
Colonel "Pappy" Boyington, Travis 
and Bob and The Four Coins. 



Still First 



Birmingham, Ala. 



5000 Watts at 61 on the Dial 

Personality Programming of Music and News 

24 Hours a Day 




National Representative: Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 

Southern Representative: James S. Aycrs Company 




\ 



41 



r L I 

radio J Listening habits 



How radio listening differs by region and county size 

|uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiii hi ■ ■! ■':!'! :'ii i' ■: ■ ^ ■ .; : ,!■ ii ; - !!'■ in;:, 1 . : :ii ,;,i: iiiiminm mini m nun iiiumim mimnm iiiimiiniiinimimiimmi 

Average hours radio usage per home per day 

T ° T S AL TERRITORY COUNTY SIZE 

West 



Central 




H Source: Nielsen Radio Index, in-home only. November-December 1958. 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM 

How listening differs morning, afternoon and evening 

minium! 



Average daily hours of radio usage per home by day part 

October 1958 



Morning 
6-9 a.m. .34 hrs. or 20 min. 

9 a.m.-Ncon .42 hr.~. or 25 min. 
6 a.m. -Noon .75 hrs. or 45 min. 



Morning 
6 a.m. -Noon .85 hrs. or 51 min. 



Afternoon 
Noon-3 p.m. .37 hrs. or 22 min 
3-6 p.m. .29 hrs. or 17 min. 

Noon-6 p.m. .65 hrs. or 39 min. 

January-February 1957 

Afternoon 
Noon-6 p.m. .77 hrs. or 46 min. 



Evening 
6-9 p.m. .24 hrs. or 14 min. 

9 p.m. -Mid. .15 hrs. or 9 min. 

6 p.m.-Mid. .39 hrs. or 23 min. 



Evening 
6 p.m. -6 a.m. .65 hrs. or 39 min. 



The material above is based on Nielsen Radio Index, covers 
in-home listening only. Morning and afternoon figures are 
for Monday through Friday. Nighttime figures are for Sunday 



through Saturday. The totals for October 1958 are comparable 
to the January-February 1957 figures except that the latter 
also covers post-midnight listening. Times are Eastern zone. 



miii miiinniiiinnii I" miiinimini mi i minimi iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiimi iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiim m milium mi mini n iiimiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiimiiiimiimiii miiimiimiinimimnii 11 n mini mini iiiiiiimmn 



iiiminiimmiinniiiiniiminmniimniinnninniiiiiiniiniminiiinimimmmminmnim 
Listeners per average quarter hour 



Radio's audience 
composition, 
morning, afternoon 
and evening 





Morning 
Mon.-Fri. 
(Million) 


Afternoon 
Mon.-Fri. 
(Million) 


Evening 

7 Days 

(Million) 


Men 


2.6 


1.9 


2.1 


Women 


7.3 


5.5 


3.3 


Teens 


1.0 


0.7 


1.1 


Children 


1.7 


1.1 


0.9 


Total 


12.6 


9.2 


7.4 



Source: NRI. Nov. -Dec. 1958. N. Y. time. 

mn 



42 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



- 



IN... 



Vmistcjicr Service 

listener Size 

listener Satisfaction 

listener Sap port 



in all the wide midwest there's only one . . . 





different . . . because it lives with its listeners 

the Prairie Fanner Station, 1230 Washington Blvd., Chicago — Monroe 6-9700— 50,000 watts — ABC 

ask BLAIR 



Ji iv 1959 



43 



r z l 

i RADIO J 

LZJ 0UT-0F-H0ME LISTENING 

Evening shows biggest jump in summer auto listening 

|!llllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli!lllllll!lli 

In-home and Auto-Plus listening, millions of homes per minute 



= 


] 


VIorning Mon.-Fri 


• i 


Afternoon Mon.-Fri. 


Evening 7 


days 




g 


TOTAL 




6.9 




6.9 




=1 






6.7 






n 




6.3 




1.2 












= 








= 
















1.4 




w 












1.5 








= 


AUTO-PLUS 


1.3 
















B 






H 




















H§ 




















4.4 




= 




1.3 




4.0 




=j 








u 
























1.0 




1 


IN-HOME 


5.0 




5.7 




5.2 




5.5 




3.1 




3.0 




1 





























July '58 |an. '59 |uly '58 |an. '59 |uly '58 Ian. '59 

Homes figures above, taken from Nielsen data, average listening per minute during each of the six-hoiir day parts indicated. Note 
that auto listening is up morning, afternoon and evening during the summer and that the evening increase is fully 30% above winter 



" : " ! ! ! " . : ' : ' ■ : i ! ■ - : i I ! : : ■ i I " : , ! < - ■ : ■ ' : ' : - ' ^ : i M ! r . ' I ! ! I ! : I ' . I ! : . : m : 1 1 ; i : M ■ " 1 1 : ; : | i ! | . ; : ; ; , ; : : : : ! ! : ! ' ' . : ! ! ' " J ' ' i 1 1 1 ' ■ : M . ! ; " : - ! j i | ■ ' , ! ! : . ; : 1 1 ! . ; ! i i [ . . . 1 1 1 1 " : [ 1 1 ! ! . i ! ! | ! ; ! I i : , 1 1 : ! , 1 1 1 ' ; I ! ! ! 1 1 " ' ■ 1 1 i ! : 1 1 ; : : i 1 1 : 1 1 1 ' ' : ! 1 1 1 I : I ■ : 1 1 r ' ! I ! : : 1 1 1 1 . : 1 1 ! 



Some examples of peak auto listening times 

lll!lllll!l!!llllllll!!!lllllli!;ill!!llll!!!!!IIIIII! Hill 



."lli^ 



Nielsen Auto-Plus during selected peak periods 



( Mon.-Fri 

7-7:15 
8-8:15 
4-4:15 
5-5:15 

(Sat.) 
1-1:30 

(Sun.) 
3-3:30 



Source: A. 
Feb. 1959 



.) 

a.m. 
a.m. 
p.m. 
p.m. 

p.m. 

p.m. 



New 


York 


Ch 


cago 


Dallas 




Los 


Angeles 


% 
in-home 


% 
in auto 


% 
in-home 


% 
in auto 


% 
in-home 


% 

in auto 


% 
in-home 


% 
in auto 


18.5 


3.3 


28.5 


4.8 


25.1 


4.5 


14.2 


5.5 


24.6 


3.4 


30.6 


3.4 


21.6 


3.0 


15.6 


2.0 


8.8 


3.7 


13.0 


3.9 


12.1 


3.8 


13.7 


5.3 


10.6 


3.9 


13.9 


4.4 


13.8 


4.4 


14.5 


4.8 



18.7 



13.1 



3.6 



3.4 



14.2 



14.9 



3.7 



3.0 



14.4 



8.7 



3.6 



2.9 



15.3 



12.1 



3.2 



3.5 



C. Nielsen Co. Percent total households in each market tuned to radio at home and in autos. Los Angeles, .Ian. 1959; New York and Dalla 
Chicago, Mar. 1959. 



44 



l!l!IIIUIIIIillll)IIPIIII!!li;illI!lll« 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 



FIRST 

IN AUDIENCE 

IN 

HUNTINGTON,W.VA. 

FIRST 

IN AUDIENCE 

IN ASHLAND, KY. 

FIRST 

IN AUDIENCE 

IN 
IRONTON, OHIO 




THE QUALITY STATION THAT IS LOCAL Ask John 

Pearson Reps for information on how you always reach more than 30 % of 
the nation's 82d market with WCMI Radio . . . or, better still, call Hank Grad 
in Huntington-Ashland direct, and he'll help you save money by buying a com- 
bination of Wheeling's finest local station, WOMP Radio, and WCM I RADIO 



july 1959 



45 



r L i 

RADIO 



Out-of-home listening 



Some facts about automobiles and automobile radios 

lllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllN^ 



1. 86% of new autos are 
radio-equipped 



Year 


% new cars 
radio- 
equipped 


1954 


81.0 


1955 


83.0 


1956 


86.2 


1957 


87.5 



1958 



86.0 



2. Cars on the road have 
doubled since 1940 



Total 
registrations 



Year 


(Millions) 


1940 


32.0 


1945 


30.6 


1950 


48.6 



1958 



68.4 



3. Highway travel is high 



in summer 



Month 



Million 
miles 



Month 



Million 
miles 



June 



770 



Dec. 



630 



Source: Peters, Griffin \- Woodward study on summer radio. 



Where out-of-home listening takes place 



NEW YORK 



Place 


Summer 
**1949 


1957 


Winter 
"1949 


1958 


Automobile 


35% 


69% 


41% 




57% 


At Work 


21 




15 


25 




19 


Visiting Others 


21 




9 


24 




17 


Outdoors (portable) 


8 




9 
3 

7 


3 

10 

9 




1 


Restaurants & Bars 


9 


4 


Retail, service, clubs, etc. 


8 


9 


Total 


*102 


* 


112 *112 

CHICACO 


* 


107 


Place 




Summer 
1957 




Winter 
"1950 


1958 


Automobile 




65% 




40% 




59% 


At Work 




14 




17 




17 


Visiting Others 




7 




24 




18 


Outdoors (portable) 




12 










Restaurants & Bars 




6 




11 




2 


Retail, service, clubs, etc. 




8 




8 




12 


Total 




*112 


KANSAS 


100 
CITY 


* 


108 


Place 




Summer 
1957 






Winter 
1958 




Automobile 




69% 






57% 




At Work 




11 






13 




Visiting Others 




8 






19 




Outdoors (portable) 




10 










Restaurants & Bars 




5 






5 





LOS ANCELES 



Retail, service, clubs, etc. 



13 



Total 

•Total over lUO^i because of multiple impressions. 
Source: Pulse. 



*110 *107 

'Only markets for which comparable past reports available. 



100 



100 



Jan. 


540 
540 
580 
650 
675 


July 


830 


I 


Feb. 


Aug. 


880 


1 


Mar. 

Apr. 


Sept. 
Oct. 


725 
700 


a 


May 


Nov. 


650 


1 



fillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 

About 60% of out-of-home listening is in autos 

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Summer 
1957 


Winter 
1958 


73% 


65% 


11 


14 


4 


10 


10 


2 


2 


3 


7 


9 


*107 *103 
DALLAS 


Summer 
1957 


Winter 
1958 


71% 


64% 


13 


14 


4 


13 


10 


2 


4 


3 


6 


9 


*108 
22-MARKET 


*105 
AVERAGE 


Summer 
1957 


Winter 
1958 


63% 


58% 


12 


15 


6 


14 


10 


1 


V 


}» 



1 IIIIIIIIII^INIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Il!ll!llll!ll!!llll!!!llllllllllll!llllllll!llll!!lllll!!lll!l!l!!lll!lllllllllll!l! I Illllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIII I IIIIIHUI I Hlllllilllllllllllllllllli I ilWIIIIill 



46 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 




Other WQAM Firsts: 

Hooper — morning, afternoon, all day. First 250 of 264 
daytime % hours. 

Metro Pulse — 280 first place daytime }4 hours out of 280. 
Trendex — First a.m., afternoon, all day. 

First Miami Radio Station to be awarded a plaque by the 

Miami Opera Guild. Four consecutive annual National Safety Council 

Awards. 41,000 public service announcements 

over a 12-month period. 

Chat with Blair ... or WQAM G. M. Jack Sandler 

WQAM — Serving all of Southern Florida with 5,000 watts on 560 kc. Miami 



one 
of the 

STORZ 

Stations 

Todd Storz, President 

Home Office: Omaha 

WDGY Minneapolis- St. Paul 

WHB Kansas City 

KOMA Oklahoma City 

WTIX New Orleans 

WQAM Miami 



july 1959 



47 



r 2 1 

i radio Out-of-home listening 



How out-of-home compares to in-home listening 

iiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiw 

Percent out-of-home listening adds to in-home in 28 markets 

S MARKET TOTAL AUDIENCE IN HOME + OUT OF HOME = OUT OF HOME PLUS 



ATLANTA 


20.5% 


16.4% 


4.1% 


25.0% 


BALTIMORE 


17.7 


13.9 


3.8 


27.3 


BIRMINGHAM 


19.8 


15.7 


4.1 


26.0 


BOSTON 


21.7 


16.7 


5.0 


29.9 


BUFFALO 


20.7 


16.3 


4.4 


27.0 


CHICAGO 


23.0 


18.6 


4.4 


23.6 


CINCINNATI 


18.4 


14.3 


4.1 


28.7 


CLEVELAND 


18.9 


14.9 


4.0 


26.8 


COLUMBUS 


20.5 


16.3 


4.2 


25.8 


DALLAS 


21.7 


17.0 


4.7 


27.6 


DETROIT 


18.7 


14.7 


4.0 


27.2 


FORT WORTH 


19.9 


15.6 


4.3 


27.5 


HOUSTON 


21.3 


17.2 


4.1 


23.8 


KANSAS CITY 


21.0 


16.4 


4.6 


28.0 


LOS ANGELES 


22.5 


17.5 


5.0 


28.5 


MIAMI 


23.3 


18.5 


4.8 


26.0 


MILWAUKEE 


21.6 


17.0 


4.6 


27.1 


MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 


21.0 


16.9 


4.1 


24.3 


NEW ORLEANS 


20.0 


16.1 


3.9 


24.2 


NEW YORK 


22.7 


17.7 


5.0 


28.3 


PHILADELPHIA 


21.9 


18.0 


3.9 


21.7 


PITTSBURGH 


20.8 


16.8 


4.0 


23.8 


RICHMOND 


19.4 


15.1 


4.3 


28.5 


ST. LOUIS 


21.0 


16.6 


4.4 


26.5 


SAN DIEGO 


21.5 


17.0 


4.5 


26.5 


SAN FRANCISCO 


22.7 


17.8 


4.9 


27.5 


SEATTLE 


22.3 


17.8 


4.5 


25.2 


WASHINGTON 


19.8 


15.6 


4.2 


26.9 


Median Average 


20.8 


16.6 


4.2 


25.3 



28 Market Weighted Average 



4.5 



26.3 



21.6 17.1 

SOURCE: Pulse, Jan. -Feb. -Mar. 1959. 
llllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllffl 
43 AIR MEDIA BASICS 




ABOVE ALL . . . 



WGY 



YOUR SALES MESSAGE 
MORE EFFECTIVELY 

WGY will deliver your sales message more 
effectively in the rich market area it serves: 
Albany — Schenectady — Troy, plus Northeast- 
ern New York and Western New England. 
We can back this up with a file of sales suc- 
cess stories — for details, contact your local 
Henry I. Christal man or call WGY, Sche- 
nectady, New York. 

50,000 Watts • NBC Affiliate • 810 Kilocycles 
A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 




r L 1 

RADIO 



Out-of-home listening 



The trend in out-of-home listening is upward 



r':; •■'i)i--i^ : ; 'H!ii'--ii" ; - ^^MN!; :.;;iM. ■ iiii;: ,iii: : miii'miii!:. ;rN!ir ' ! ,; imiiu iiiM:::!!!!:!:!!!::.:!!!::!!!!;!!!!!;-!!!!;!:!!!;:!!!!:: mi: ':iiim i:ii; ;:iiii!;tiii!;!iiii.MiiiiiiiiM:i!!i!::!ii!]Miii:[!iii;;uin:!ii -:n ! i: ! 'iMi-nr ^'M-MiiiLiiii 1 !! liiifiKJMiiinmjfiiiiiiiir'iii; .im ii ! iya 

Per cent homes listening out-of-home, winter and summer, 1953-1959 





1953 

W S 


1954 

W S 


1955 
W S 


1956 

W S 


1957 
W S 


1958 

W S 


1959 
W 


Atlanta 


3.3 


3.6 


3.2 


3.6 


3.2 




3.4 


4.0 


4.1 


4.1 


4.0 


4.5 


4.1 


Baltimore 


3.2 


3.5 


3.2 


3.6 


3.2 




3.4 


4.1 


3.8 


4.1 


3.7 


4.6 


3.8 


Birmingham 


3.2 


3.5 


3.6 


3.8 


3.3 


3.6 


4.1 


4.4 


4.3 


4.4 


4.1 


4.4 


4.1 


Boston 


3.8 


4.2 


4.4 


4.6 


4.2 


4.6 


4.8 


5.1 


4.7 


4.8 


4.4 


5.3 


5.0 


Buffalo 




3.5 


3.6 


3.7 


3.2 


3.4 


3.2 


3.8 


3.6 


3.7 


3.9 


4.5 


4.4 


Chicago 


3.1 


3.7 


3.9 


4.3 


4.1 


4.2 


4.0 


4.6 


4.3 


4.6 


4.5 


5.2 


4.4 


Cincinnati 


3.1 


3.6 


3.6 


3.9 


3.6 


3.9 


3.8 


4.2 


4.0 


4.2 


3.9 


4.6 


4.1 


Columbus 




3.1 




3.2 


3.1 


3.3 


3.4 


4.0 


3.5 


3.8 


4.3 


4.6 


4.2 


Dallas 




3.9 






3.6 


4.0 


4.5 


4.7 


4.6 


5.5 


4.7 


4.6 


4.7 


Detroit 


3.0 


3.8 


3.9 


4.2 


3.9 


4.2 


3.8 


4.3 


4.2 


4.4 


3.8 


4.4 


4.0 


Fort Worth 














4.0 




4.0 


5.3 


4.5 


4.2 


4.3 


Houston 




3.8 


3.6 


4.1 


4.0 


4.3 


4.3 


4.6 


4.4 


4.5 


4.0 


4.5 


4.1 


Kansas City 




3.2 




3.7 


3.4 




3.8 


4.1 


3.9 


4.3 


4.0 


4.9 


4.6 


Los Angeles 


4.2 


4.4 


4.5 


4.8 


4.5 


4.7 


4.4 


4.7 


4.7 


5.0 


4.7 


5.3 


5.0 


Miami 


2.9 




3.1 




3.3 


3.7 


4.4 


4.6 


4.7 


4.7 


4.8 


4.9 


4.8 


Milwaukee 






3.3 
3.4 


3.8 
3.8 


3.3 
3.7 


3.8 
3.9 


3.5 
3.7 


4.3 
4.2 


4.3 
4.2 


4.4 
4.4 


4.0 
4.1 


4.2 
4.8 


4.6 


Mpls.-St. Paul 


_ 3.1 _ 


3.4 


4.1 


New Orleans 




3.2 




3.7 


3.3 


3.4 


4.4 


4.6 


4.4 


4.6 


3.7 


4.1 


3.9 


New York 


4.0 


4.4 


4.4 


4.8 


4.4 


4.4 


4.6 


5.0 


5.1 


4.8 


5.1 


5.4 


5.0 


Philadelphia 


3.5 


3.8 


3.6 


3.9 


3.9 


4.0 


3.8 


4.4 


3.7 


4.6 


4.0 


4.2 


3.9 


Pittsburgh 






3.4 




3.5 


3.9 


3.6 


3.9 


3.9 


4.1 


3.9 


4.2 


4.0 


Portland, Ore. 










3.6 




3.4 




4.4 










Richmond 




2.9 


3.1 


3.2 


2.9 


3.0 


3.1 


4.3 


3.7 


4.1 


3.9 


4.5 


4.3 


St. Louis 




3.4 


3.5 


3.8 


3.8 


4.2 


3.9 


4.3 


4.2 


4.4 


3.8 


4.6 


4.4 


San Diego 




3.2 




3.5 


3.5 


3.8 


3.6 


4.1 


4.0 


4.2 


4.4 


4.5 


4.5 


San Francisco 


3.9 


4.4 


4.1 


4.2 


4.2 




4.5 


4.7 


4.6 


4.6 


4.4 


5.2 


4.9 


Seattle 


2.8 


3.2 


3.2 


3.5 


4.4 


4.2 


4.1 


4.1 


4.2 


4.4 


4.5 


4.7 


4.5 


Washington 


3.2 


3.6 


3.7 


4.0 


3.7 


3.9 


3.7 


4.1 


4.1 


4.3 


3.9 


4.5 


4.2 


Median 


3.2 


3.6 


3.6 


3.8 


3.6 


3.9 


3.8 


4.3 


4.2 


4.4 


4.1 


4.6 


4.2 



This broad look at out-of-home listening in 28 markets discloses a winter hike of 31% over the six-year 
1953-59 span and a summer jump of 28% over the five-year 1953-58 span. Reasons for this increase include 
more portable radios, more auto radios, more auto driving and more programing aimed at the auto audience 



RiiiiilllllllliiillllllllllllllillllllM 

\ 

50 AIR MEDIA BASICS 






As you look to ihr conductor in the 

podium for the tempo, the pacing ami 

the ultimate greatness of a musical 

performance . . . so you look to 

(rood Music Broadcasters, Inc. for 

the facts on the delivery power and 

economy of Good Music Advertising. 

Good Music Broadcasters. Inc. are 

national representatives for the 

leading Good Music Stations in the 

major markets from coast to coast. 



GOOD MUSIC BROADCASTERS, Inc., 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE. NEW YORK 17. N. Y. Ml 3-2295 



PHILADELPHIA'S FIRST STATION FOR FINE MUSIC 



WFLN-AM-FM, Philadelphia, 
is the one radio station 
in the Delaware Valley 
which, for ten years, 
has consistently 
presented fine music 
exclusively; much of it 
stereophonically. This 
fact has made WFLN the 
first choice of that 
loyal mass audience 
whose income accounts 
for two thirds of the 
Philadelphia area's 
buying power. 





i> WFLN 



95.7 900 



[ I AM 

PH ILADELPH I A 



















g 









WFLN-AM-FM, 8200 RIDGE AVENUE, PHILADELPHIA 28, PENNSYLVANIA. 

Represented nationally by Good Music Broadcasters, Inc., 52 Vanderbilt Avenue, New York 17 



July 1959 



51 



r 2 1 

I RADIO 

L_J SPOT RADIO'S CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE 

Two ways to look at station cumulative audiences 



ll!llll!!!llll!llll!ll!!ll!l!llll!l!llll!!!lllllllll!lllllllllll 

A. Average station reaches half the homes in a market weekly 





Albany-Troy- 
(7 Sta 
DAILY 


Schenectady 
ions) 

WEEKLY 


18 
DAILY 


Buffalo 
Stations) 

WEEKLY 


B 

(10 
DAILY 


iltimore 
Stations) 

WEEKLY 




27.77 




52.65 


27.66 




49.78 


21.48 


41.52 




45.7 




75.7 


58.3 




80.3 


41.7 


72.9 




7.1 




16.8 


9.6 




21.3 


3.0 


8.1 




Chatta 
16 Stal 
DAILY 


looga 
ions) 

WEEKLY 


Cleveland 

(8 Stations) 

DAILY WEEKLY 


C 
(7 
DAILY 


slumbus 
Stations) 

WEEKLY 




30.7 




48.33 


27.48 




52.0 


15.6 


30.2 




44.2 




86.2 


45.9 




78.6 


29.72 


55.07 




15.6 




30.2 


8.1 




19.7 


9.8 


25.9 




(8 
DAILY 


Dall 
Stat 


as 
ions) 

WEEKLY 


(11 

DAILY 


Denver 
Stations) 

WEEKLY 


Sacramento 

(6 Stationsl 

DAILY WEEKLY 




28.95 




49.7 


24.07 




48.33 


32.55 


62.38 




67.9 




85.2 


50.3 




77.2 


43.7 


77.4 




3.8 




8.2 


6.9 




15.8 


20.3 


37.6 



AVERAGE 

HIGH 

LOW 



AVERAGE 

HIGH 

LOW 



AVERAGE 

HIGH 

LOW 

These Pulse figures, taken from surveys during the October 1958 through January 1959 period, show percent 
of homes reached in market area surveyed during average day and week. Stations can hit 80% of homes weekly 

B. Stations reach about 10% of market weekly during three-hour day-part 





Rating per 
broadcast 


3-hr. 
cume 


Weekly 
cume 


4-week 
cume 


Episodes 
per home 


New York network station 


2.7 


7.0 


6-9 a.m. 
11.1 


18.4 


34.6 


Columbus independent station 


2.6 


5.2 


9 a.m. -Noon 

11.4 


25.2 


25.0 


Birmingham network station 


2.0 


5.6 


Noon-3 p.m. 

10.5 


21.6 


22.3 


San Diego independent station 


1.1 


4.4 


3-6 p.m. 

8.6 


17.5 


14.5 



Source: NSI, December 1958, except San Diego, which is November 1958; in-home Monday through Friday only. Per broadcast ratings are by 15- 
minute periods. Cumulative homes are unduplicated. Episodes per home are averages for four-week period. Stations were picked at random, are 
not necessarily representative of audience levels in each market. 

The two studies above look at the same thing in two different ways. The top chart shows the total unduplicated 
audience of stations during an entire day and an entire week. The bottom study measures unduplicated audience 
only within a specified three-hour block, but shows station audience in terms of weekly and four-week totals 



52 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



A STEADY FIVE YEAR CLIMB TO 





MACON.GA 



DECISIVELY . . . YOUR BEST BUY.' 



/ 



6 A.M. -12 NOON 

SHARE MORNING 

) 



45 
40 
35 
30 
25 
20 
15 
10 



12 NOON-6 P.M. 
AFTERNOON 



6 P.M. -MIDNIGHT 

NIGHT 



STA. B 









\ 




\ 






\* 






\ 


< 




K 


/ 




V 


\ 






> 


L -— . 


<x 




Not on at Night— Sta. E 
I 1 I I 



1955 56 57 58 59 1955 56 57 58 59 1955 56 57 58 59 
• • - 5Yrs ... 5Yrs 5Yrs 

■ Pulse 



719 1 StalCcvL on. M-oxxpen a/ndL 9ulde / 



wbml 



MACON'S 24-HOUR MOBILE NEWS STATION 



See FORJOE, Nat'l Rep. 




STA. E 



ONE MINUTE CLASS A 



July 1959 



53 



r 2 1 

RADIO 



Spot radio's cumulative audience 



Stations reach practically their entire audience in a week 

IIII!liili!llllllll!l!lll!l!llllll»i!!!ll!IIP 



Station circulation 



(homes reached) in six markets 

Daily 



Market 


Rank 


Day 


Night 


Weekly 


Monthly 


New York 


Top station 


1,287,530 


763,830 


1,840.200 


1.966,580 


Median station 


614,090 


432,220 


948,540 


1,003,270 


Chicago 


Top station 


826,580 


465,440 


1,497,710 


1,663,050 


Median station 


521,170 


307,490 


935,190 


1,031,100 


Houston 


Top station 


125,960 


59,420 


214,730 


234,140 


Median station 


45,610 


21,010 


94,330 


104,750 


New Orleans 


Top station 


249,120 


241,750 


525,700 


596,110 


Median station 


45,970 


21,700 


84,590 


91,700 


San Diego 


Top station 


46,150 


22,950 


81,600 


94,350 


Median station 


36,970 


11,730 


72,680 


81,350 


Dayton 


Top station 


87,750 


29,710 


151,410 


170,640 


Median station 


42,620 


19,260 


83,190 


95,400 



Data above come from NCS No. 2 (Spring 1956), shows different homes reached over various periods of time. Stations 
are ranked according to weekly circulation. Note that weekly figures range about 90% of monthly reach. Nielsen 12- 
week figures indicate slight additions but for all practical purposes stations generally reach total audience in a week 



ajMli' .:"' ' ■ II!: .il' : !l I 1 "' ;|''- . - |i : .;i" ^'! i||. ,||': . il!' III!' M|!l iM' ■!!' :|" J! 1 'j :: ! ' ill '!"■ Mr u; |: ; M :M | : mj. : M: M m .| M 

How schedule switch can boost cumulative audience 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM 



54 



Sunday spots lift reach of prime time buys 



4 WEEK CUMULATIVE AUDIENCE 



1 


6-9 AM 
5 Weekdays 


Description 
of schedule 


Percent 
of homes 


Number 
of homes 


Episodes 
per home 


Home 
impressions 


Station total 


60 1 /4 hours weekly 


20.9% 


891,760 


12.2 


10,879,470 


1 


Schedule A 


10 spots weekly 


15.4 


657,100 


3.0 


1,971,300 


1 


Schedule B 


A plus 10 spots weekly 


18.0 


768,000 


4.9 


3,763,200 


1 


Schedule C 


B plus 20 spots weekly 


19.7 


840,600 


8.5 


7,145,100 


I 


6-9 AM 

4 Weekdays & Sun. 












1 


Schedule D 


10 spots weekly 


20.2 


861,900 


2.5 


2,154,750 


1 


Schedule E 


D plus 10 spots weekly 


21.2 


904,600 


4.7 


4,251,620 


( 


Schedule F 


E plus 20 spots weekly 


24.8 


1,058,200 


8.4 


8,888,880 



NSI FIGURES above are taken from one radio station in a major market. Top line shows station's total audience in 
early morning block. First three schedules show audience for 10, 20 and 40 15-minute periods weekly over four week 
Monday through Friday. Second three schedules show two, four, eight Sunday periods substituted for Wednesday periods 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



National Spot Radio 

today offers advertisers big opportunities 

to sell their products and services to 

millions of potential customers 

selectively, frequently and 

economically. 



Radio 
Division 



Edward Petry & Co., Inc. 

The Original Station Representative 



MEW YORK • CHICAGO • ATLANTA • BOSTON • DALLAS • DETROIT 
LOS ANGELES • SAN FRANCISCO • ST. LOUIS 

July 1959 55 



r 2 1 

I RADIO J 

LZJI SPENDING AND COSTS 

What advertisers spent on radio during the past two years 



Total radio expenditures by clients dipped 
almost imperceptibly last year, primarily 
because of network radio, according to 
estimates by McCann-Erickson as pub- 
lished in Printers' Ink. The 1958 figures 
were calculated before FCC release of 
1958 am financial data which showed net- 
work time sales at $46.5 million (down 
8.17c ■>, spot time sales at $172 million (up 
1.5% — see chart below) and local time 
sales at $320.2 million (up 1.1%). The 
1958 FCC report also corrected 1957 radio 
financial data, viz: network time sales re- 
vised down a little, spot sales up a little 



■IIIIIIIIU!^ 

Total ad investment in radio, 1957-58 



1958 



1957 





Millions 


Pe 

a 


cent of all 
dvertising 


Millions 


Per cent of all Per cent change 
advertising '58 vs. '57 


Total 


$616.0 




6.0 


$618.9 


6.0 -0.6 


Network 


61.0 




0.6 


64.7 


0.6 -5.7 


Spot 


185.0 




1.8 


187.1 


1.8 -1.1 



Local 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



370.0 



3.6 



367.1 



3.6 



+0.8 






Spot radio time sales were up 1.5% in 1958 

Sllllllllllllllllll 



1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 

$119,559,000 $123,658,000 $129,605,000 $120,168,000 $120,393,000 $145,461,000 $169,511,000 $172,000,000 

H Source: Figures above relate to station income from time sales only, after rate discounts but before commissions to reps, agencies. Source of all figures is FCC. 

IllllilillllllllllllH 

The trends in spot radio rates, day and night 

|iiiiiini!iiiiiiiiii mi :':■:' j 1 .,: ;, l ",!i i : :l " : ; '' uva 

Rate changes in top 150 markets, Dec. 1957 and 1958 



Prepared under the direction of Dan 
Denenholz, Katz Agency research chief, the 
charts above are based on the rep firm's 
"Spot Radio Budget Estimator." One sta- 
tion in each market — in most cases the 
highest cost station — was used in tabulat- 
ing rates from SRDS. Rate used was that 
for 12 one-minute announcements per we;k 
for 13 weeks. The early morning-late after- 
noon rate was the average cost for the 
7-9 a.m. and 4-6 p.m. periods. Daytime rate 
was that in effect for most hours between 
9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Evening rate was that in 
?ffect for most hours between 6 and 11 p.m. 



56 







Ratio of prime 
rates to other 


time and night 
daytime rates 


1958 rates as percent 


of 1957 


1957 


1958 


1st 150 markets 


Index: 
1957 = 100 


Index: 
daytime = 100 


Index: 
daytime = 100 


early morn. -late after. 


101.8 


113.8 


116.2 


daytime 


99.7 




evening 


93.6 


91.9 


86.3 



l!l!lllll!!lllll!l!llll!!llll!llllll!l!ll!llllllllllllllllll!!!l!!!lllll[!!llllllllll!l!llllllliy 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 



EXPLOSION! 



That sound you're hearing from the lower left hand corner of 
America isn't caused by nuclear fission. It's the 19th market . . . 
bursting wide open. San Diego. Working, playing and buying at 
a furious pace. And KFMB Radio echoes the healthy, vibrant 
sounds. CBS speaks from around the world. Our own reporters 
know this market intimately — and vice versa. Happy music, nice 
personalities. Variety. Overall, San Diego's own bounce, pace and 
life captured by the station with the biggest audiences in the 
better part of Southern - ' : - ; • *•'-'*? -California. \V e have a 
corner on this corner:;i^j^^^^^^.S : 'yqi the country and 
it will throw open-W^^ f^*^ *: its pockets and 
purses for vou . *%*5 ^lj»?'^ , #* through us. Touch 
our fuse an a • * «. -v^&A.* &l.to* jdk*-» w ' - — s t a n d b a c k ! 



* ■ 




\. © . 



KFMB RADIO ° SAN DIEGO 



REPRESENTED BY EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. 



July 1959 



57 



r 2 i 

RADIO 



Spending and costs 






These were spot radio's 51 leading spenders in 1958 

§pilill|llll!lllillllllll Illllll IIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI Ill Iimilllimillllllllimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllimillllllllimillimillll ||||||||||||||||||||||||| ||||||||||||||||| |||||||||||||| ||||||||||||||||||||||| I!!! |||||||| |||||!l| ||]|||| | I!l!!|||||||||||||i|||||||l!||||||||||!!||||l|||! -: 

Net expenditures in spot radio 



RANK 



COMPANY 



RAB-ESTIMATED 
EXPENDITURES 



RANK 



COMPANY 



RAB-ESTIMATED 
EXPENDITURES 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 

11. 

12. 

13. 

14. 

15. 
16. 

17. 



General Motors Corp $5,400,000 



Ford Motor Co. 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. . 
American Tobacco Co. .._ ... 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

Texas Co 

Chrysler Corp. 

Sinclair Oil Corp. 



5,000.000 
4,700,000 
4,600.000 
2,700,000 
2,600,000 
2,300,000 
2,200,000 
Thomas Leeming & Co., Inc. .. 2,000,000 



Miles Laboratories, Inc. $1,100,000 



Lever Bros. Co. 

Standard Brands, Inc. 

Anheuser-Busch, Inc 

Carling Brewing Co., Inc 

Bristol-Myers Co 

Fels & Co - 

Shell Oil Co 

Continental Baking Co., Inc. .. 

Sterling Drug, Inc. 

B. C. Remedy Co. _. __ _ 

Beneficial Finance Co 

Plough, Inc. 

P. Lorillard Co. 

Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey) 

Alemite Div. of Stewart-Warner Corp. 

Best Foods. Inc 

Cities Service Co. 



1,900,000 
1,900,000 
1,800,000 
1,800,000 
1,700,000 
1,700,000 
1,700,000 
1,600,000 
1,600,000 
1,500,000 
1,500,000 
1,400,000 
1,200,000 
1,200,000 
1,100,000 
1,100,000 
1,100,000 



18. 



19. 
20. 
21. 

22. 
23. 
24. 

25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 



Northwest Orient Airlines 

American Airlines, Inc 

Gulf Oil Corp. ._ 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. 

The Quaker Oats Company 

Tetley Tea Co., Inc. . 

American Home Products Corp. 

Household Finance Corp 

Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co. ... 

Campbell Soup Co _ 

National Carbon Co. 

Associated Sepian Products 

Liebmann Breweries, Inc. 

Colgate-Palmolive Co. 

Revlon, Inc. 

Sun Oil Co. 

Robert Hall Clothes, Inc. 

Falstaff Brewing Corp. 

Beech-Nut Life Savers, Inc. 

Seaboard Finance Co. 

P. Ballantine & Sons 

General Mills. Inc. 

Theo Hamm Brewing Co. 

Trans World Airlines. Inc. 



1,100,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
1,000,000 
960,000 
925,000 
900,000 
900,000 
840,000 
800,000 
780,000 
780,000 
750,000 
750,000 
730,000 
725,000 
720,000 
715,000 
700,000 
650,000 
650,000 
650,000 
650,000 



m 



SOURCE: Radio Advertising Bureau estimates. Net spending after discounts 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiira iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii 



IIIIIIJ!ll!lll!i!i;i!il!il!lllllllllllllll!l!ll(lll^ 



These are the top spenders 
in spot radio this year 
measured by time used 



Expenditures of various 
industries in spot radio 
during one 1958 quarter 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin mil i ii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiii i i i i i i i hi i mm iiiffliiniiiiiiiiiiiiii mm imiiiimimmiiimiii 11 mmimiimiiiii iimi iiiiimiiiiii iiiiimmiiiiii 11 in 11 



Top 20 clients, first quarter, 1959 



RANK 



COMPANY 



1 Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. g 

2 Thomas Leeming & Co., Inc. =_ g 

g 3 R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. g = 

4 Ford Motor Co. g 

5 P. Lorillard Co. 1 

6 American Tobacco Co. 1 

g 7 Pharmaco, Inc. % 

H 8 Campbell Soup Co. f 

9 Beneficial Finance Co. | 

{j 10 Philip Morris, Inc. 1 g 

1 1 The Borden Co. i 

[ 12 Plough, Inc. 1 § 

| 13 _ Bristol-Myers Co. j 

\ 14 Sinclair Oil Corp. §§ =_ 

| 15 _. ..B. C. Remedy Co. j 

[ 16 The Chattanooga Medicine Co. g 

| 17 Miles Laboratories, Inc. g g 

f 18 _ Tetley Tea Co., Inc. H g 

U 19 Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey) 

| 20 ...Sterling Drug, Inc. ( g 

g SOURCE: RAB ranking based on amount of time used. 



3d quarter '58, by category 

RANK CATEGORY % OF TOTAL 

1 Food and grocery 18.9 

2 Gasoline, lubricants 18.3 

3 Tobacco products 13.3 

4 Ale, beer, wine 9.0 

5 Cleansers — _ 6.8 

6 Automotive 6.0 

Drugs 6.0 

8 Toilet requisites _ ~_ _ 4.6 

9 Finance 3.4 

10 Agriculture 3.0 

11 Transportation, travel 2.0 

12 Miscellaneous _ 1.9 

13 Confections, soft drinks 1.6 

14 Consumer Services 1.0 

15 Household, General .7 

Pet products .7 

17 Building material .6 

Clothing, apparel, accessories _. .6 

Publications .6 

Amusements _ .6 

21 Watches, jewelry, silverware .4 

SOURCE: Die RAB estimates above are based on tlie amount of time pur- 
chased by clients in these categories. Religious and political sponsorship are 
not included. Note that top three categories account for 50% of buys. Tliis 
was latest material available. 

iimiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiimiiimiiiiiiiiimi 



58 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



firmly in 

FIRST PLACE ON HOOPER (all-day average) 
plus MORE THAN HALF THE FIRST PLACE 
PULSE QUARTER HOURS (266 of 504 
quarter-hours, Monday-Sunday, 6 a.m. -midnight) 





MINNEAPOLIS -ST. PAUL 

"The 50,000 Watt Station.. . with the 50,000 Watt Personalities" 

General Manager: C. B. Clarke, Jr. Represented by: John Blair A Co. 



one 
of the 

STORZ 

Stations 

Todd Storz, President 

Home Office: Omaha 

WDGY Minneapolis- St. Paul 

WHB Kansas City 

KOMA Oklahoma City 

WTIX New Orleans 

WQAM Miami 



July 1959 



59 



f L 1 

I radio J Spending and costs 



These are the top billing radio agencies 

jflllllll I' HI"" WHIM Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ' i:> J' ::i' ,' !:i' ! il' ,: r' : ' . i J' Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll illllllllllllll Illllll!!llll!!l||||||||||||||||[|||||||||||| 

How top 50 air agencies rank in total radio billings 



Rank 


Ag 


ency 


Total radio 
(million $) 


1 


J. Walter 


Thompson* 


$16.3 


2 


McCann-Erickson 


15 


2 


BBDO* 




15 


4 


Y & R* 




13.2 


5 


Ayer* 




13 


6 


Esty* 




12.5 


7 


D-F-S* 




8 


8 


FC&B 




6.5 


9 


Ted Bates 




6.3 


10 


SSC&B 




6 


10 


C& W* 




6 


12 


Grey 




5.4 


13 


K &E 




5.3 


14 


D'Arcy 




5 


15 


NC&K 




4.1 


16 


Lennen & Newell 


4 


17 


Gardner 




3.45 


18 


Cohen & Aleshire 


3.4 


19 


Burnett 




3.05 


20 


Campbell- 


Ewald* 


3 


21 


Needham, 


Louis & B. 


2.9 


22 


Grant 




2.8 


23 


Campbell 


Mithun 


2.5 


24 


Ogilvy, Bi 


jnson & M. 


2.4 



25 



Compton 



2.25 



Rank 


Agency 


Total radio 
(million $) 


26 


EWR&R 


$2 


26 


F S & R 


2 


26 


Mogul 


2 


29 


Donahue & Coe 


1.6 


30 


B&B 


1.5 


30 


Wade 


1.5 


30 


Warwick & Legler 


1.5 


33 


Guild, Bascom & B. 


1.47 


34 


DCSS 


1.3 


35 


Best 


1.1 


36 


Maxon 


1 


36 


D. P. Brother* 


1 


36 


Honig Cooper, H & M 


1 


36 


Geyer* 


1 


36 


Kudner 


1 


41 


McM-J & A 


0.8 


42 


E. H. Weiss 


0.7 


43 


Keyes. Madden & J. 


0.575 


44 


Tatham-Laird 


0.5 


44 


Bryan Houston 


0.5 


46 


Doyle, Dane & B. 


0.4 


47 


Reach-McClinton 


0.3 


47 


LaRoche 


0.3 


49 


Parkson 


0.2 






50 



North 



0.1 



Top 10 spot radio agencies 



Rank 


Agency 


Total spot 
(million $' 


1 


McCann-Erickson 


$13 


1 


BBDO* 


13 


3 


J. Walter Thompson* 


11.8 


4 


Ayer* 


10 


5 


Y & R* 


9.4 


6 


Esty* 


9 


7 


D-F-S* 


7 


8 


D'Arcy 


5 


9 


SSC&B 


5.8 



10 Grey 

Figures cover U.S. billings only. 



Top 10 network radio agencies 



Rank 


Agency 


Total network 
(million %) 


1 


J. Walter Thompson 


$4.5 


2 


FC&B 


3.9 


3 


Young & Rubicam 


3.8 


4 


Esty 


3.5 


5 


Ayer 


3 


6 


Campbell-Ewald 


2.5 


7 


McCann-Erickson 


2 


7 


BBDO 


2 


7 


Ted Bates 


2 



4.4 



"Indicates SPONSOR estimate for all or part of figures. 



c & w* 



60 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 






RCATHESAURUS TURNS TIME 



INTO PROFITS FOR YOU 



Here are just a few examples of the way rca thesaurus commercial library 
features build bigger profits for radio stations throughout the country: 

"We billed $12,500 in 13 weeks with shop at the store with the mike on the 
door ... 39 participating sponsors delighted ... a great campaign." Dale Woods, 
Manager, KUEIV, Wenatchee, Washington 

"Sold supermarket campaicn, 9.464 spots on firm year contract to Stater Bros, 
markets . . . terrific sales results for sponsor. Nearly all of 100 new accounts sold 
in past few months were closed by using Thesaurus jingles." Joe Klaas, Sales 
Manager, KITO, San Bernardino, California 

ggly Wiggly stores bought 52-week, 42 spots weekly schedule supermarket 
radio campaign . . . 2,184 spots annually . . . we're charging a premium fee." 
H. G. Parise, Manager, WMFG, Hibbing, Minnesota 

"1,000 supermarket campaicn jingles sold to Peerson Bros. Shopping Center... 
Superior Federal Savings bought 365 spots, datelines and sell-lines sales 
boosters." James Fesperman, Commercial Manager, KSFA, Fort Smith, 
Arkansas 

"Sold department store campaicn to Sears Roebuck, 50 announcements weekly , 
52 weeks. " Sponsor very satisfied! Just this one account pays for Thesaurus. The 
many other jingles that are sold are bringing us accounts that we never have been 
able to sell." D. Pebbles, Commercial Manager, KDBS, Alexandria, La. 

"Sold England Brothers 1.000 spots. 52 weeks department store campaign . . . 
charging a premium fee! Jingles sold the sponsor, who kept humming them all the 
way through the tape demo— very pleased!" Paul Edwards, Program Director, 
WBEC, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

"Two sales booster campaigns sold on 2 calls! "What's the Meaning of This 
Name?" to savings and loan. "Little Known Facts" to furniture store. S3,300 new 
revenue in first two weeks with Thesaurus ." Robert Z. Morrison, Jr., Sales 
Manager, WKBH, La Crosse, Wisconsin 

" Sold 1,800 announcements to Royal Crown Cola Bottling with Thesaurus SOFT 
drink jingle . . . sponsor pleased ... so are we." Ed Morgan, Manager, WETU, 
Wetumpka, Alabama 

"Thesaurus lumber jincle increased account $1,700 a year ." Hank Behre, 
Commercial Manager, WMTR, Morristown, New Jersey 

RCA thesaurus can do as much for you. and more! Wait till you hear about the 
many other sure-selling COMMERCIAL LIBRARY FEATURES we haven't even men- 
tioned. Unsold time means lost income for you, so don't let another minute slip 
by. Call your nearest rca THESAURUS representative now, and get the full low- 
cost high-profit story! 



X® RECORDED 
PROGRAM SERVICES 



155 EAST 2tth STREET. NEW YORK 10. N. Y., MLRRAY HILL 9-7200 
445 V LAKE SHORE DRIVE. CHICAGO 11. ILL.. WHITEHALL 4-3530 
1121 RHODES-HAVERTY BLDC. ATLANTA, CA . JACKSON 1-7703 
7901 EMPIRE FREEWAY. DALLAS 35. TEXAS. FLEETWOOD 2-3911 
1016 N. SYCAMORE AYE.. HOLLYWOOD 38. CAL.. OLDFIELD U660 
800 SEVENTEENTH AVE. SO.. NASHVILLE, TENN., ALPINE 5-6691 



July 1959 



(.1 



r 2 1 

I RADIO J 

L^J NETWORK PATTERNS 






The 5-minute show is the most popular network program buy 

illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllllll '■ -V . ; : :. : J ,H' ..;! Ml' ... , ,r ;; ,1. : ,■ .;; |i ; : |||||||||||||||||!||||||||||||||!|||!|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||!|||||||| r 1 ,' :., :l ' !! :: :|, :; : ,1, 'H' 'Ml ;r:i ;^ 



Total minutes sold by program length and network 



Program length 



NBC minutes 



CBS minutes 



ABC minutes 



1 Hour 








60 


30 Minutes 


150 





300 


25 Minutes 


50 








15 Minutes 


165 


390 


75 


10 Minutes 





100 





5 Minutes 


845 


290 


220 


TOTAL 


1,210 


780 


655 



Source: NBC Radio, typical week, winter 1958. 
lillillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllW 

IIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllillllllilllllllllllllllM 

What size audience can an advertiser accumulate . . . 



Typical buys on 
network radio: 
their reach and 
exposure frequency 
over four weeks 



A. With a daytime music and a nighttime news strip? 

Cumulative rating Unduplicated homes Average frequency 



9.9% 



4,882,000 



4.4 



B. With a typical morning five minute segment? 





Percent 


Number homes 


Avg. 
episodes 


Cume Audience 


11.7 


5.774.000 


3.9 


Avg. per-broadcast rating 


2.1 


1,063,000 





Source: NRI. .Tan.-Fek 19">9. 4-week cumulative data. 

illll!lllllllllllllllllllilll!!llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!lllllll!ili!llllllll!llll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 



The top 10 radio network shows and their ratings 

Top 10 Pulse network radio shows, February, 1959 



Program 


Network 


Highest rating 


World News Roundup 


CBS 


4.3 


Lowell Thomas, Sports 


CBS 


4.2 


Arthur Godfrey 


CBS 


4.1 


News-Ned Calmer (7:45 A.M.) 


CBS 


4.1 


Edward R. Murrow 


CBS 


4.0 


Ma Perkins 


CBS 


4.0 


News-D. Townsend (10:00 A.M) 


CBS 


4.0 


News-Ned Calmer (11:00 A.M.) 


CBS 


3.9 


Whispering Streets 


CBS 


3.9 



Young Dr. Malone 



CBS 



3.9 



l!l!!ll!llllllllll!llllilllllill!llllllllllll!llllllllllll!l!ill!illW 'WIS 

62 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 




GOOD MUSIC rings up sales in Los Angeles., 
and registers continuous renewals such as these: 



SLAVICK JEWELRY CO. 
UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD 
BARBARA ANN BREAD 
HAR OMAR RESTAURANT 
KIP OINTMENT 
WALLICHS MUSIC CITY 
YELLOW CAB CO. 



15th year 
10th year 
10th year 
8th year 
7th year 
7th year 
6th year 



REPUBLIC VAN & STORAGE CO. 

THE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE CO. 

MARTIN MOTORS 

CINERAMA 

BERLITZ SCHOOLS OF LANGUAGES 

PEPSI-COLA 

RCA-WHIRLPOOL 



6th year 
6th year 
6th year 
6th year 
5th year 
3rd year 
3rd year 







...more than 40 sponsors in their 2nd to 19th year! 



AC 



The Music Stations for Southern California 

24-hour simultaneous AM-FM at one low cost 

Represented by The Boiling Co., Inc. 



PRUDENTIAL SQUARE 



LOS ANGELES 



July 1959 

km 



63 




DIMENSIONS 



Here's how U. S. radio homes have grown 

i!!llllllllllllllllllli:!llllll!!!!lll!inilllll!lllilllllllllH 



Millions of U.S. homes with radios, March 1950-1959 



U.S. homes 


43.4 


44.4 


45.3 


46.1 


46.7 


47.6 


48.7 


49.5 


50.5 


51.4 


Radio homes 


41.4 


42.9 


44.3 


44.9 


45.1 


45.9 


47.0 


47.7 


48.7 


49.5 
□ 






1950 



1951 



1952 



1953 



1954 



1955 



1956 



1957 



1958 



At the rate the U.S. population is growing, there will be 
50 million radio homes by end of year. Latest Nielsen 



saturation figure is 96.3% (for all practical 
100%), just about the same level it has been 



1959 



purposes, 
for years 



IlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllI 

Radio home ownership by region and county size 

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Millions of radio homes, March 1959 







By Regions 








By county size 




Total homes 


13.3 


8.8 9.8 


12.2 


7.3 


19.0 


14.1 10.1 


8.2 


Radio homes 


12.8 


8.5 9.5 


11.7 


7.0 


18.4 


13.7 9.6 


7.8 




I 



Northeast 



East West 

Central Central 



South Pacific 



"B" 




§ The South and Pacific regions had the biggest growth in show. On the county size level, "C" and "D" counties 

numbers of radio homes since last year, Nielsen data show no radio home growth; rural population is on decline 

FT. ■; -!l||- !!■: Mi-M .ill! : '!;, ^ ill,' !: .: : .ii 1 .. Illl Illllllll I IIIHIIIII Hi IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I I I I " H" WM Hi" mmE - 

6 4 AIR MEDIA BASICS 




IN ROANOKE 



KROGER 



LOVES 



WROV 




CHARLES W. CONNER 

• alu promotion ano 

aoviktihn9 manaokr 
roanokc Division 



the nroaer co 



tt40 SHINANDOAH AVBNUK. H. w 
ROANOKE. VIRGINIA 



November 25, 1958 



Mr. Burt Levine 
Gener a I Man ager 
Radio Station WROV 
Roanoke, Virginia 

Dear Burt: 

It Is our pol lev here at Kroger to 
at four -month Intervals. 



re appr a i s e media 



During this period, we have conducted many tests of 
which you were unaware. To determine the abil ity of 
each of the personal itles to sel I for Kroger, we 
selected particular Items and assigned these during 
test weeks to the different personalities. We were 
careful that the Items were not promoted in any other 
way. At the end of each week a survey of movement 
was made. 

>ur personal Itles came through for us beyond our 
expectations . 

r— ■■■>—■— W II I 1 

For example--we Intended to run a group of household 
Items for a two-week period. We scheduled the I terns 
on WROV for the first week of the promotion. At the 
end of five days, our merchandise supply was exhausted. 
At another time we gave Jackson a particular assign- 
ment to sell a Packer Label Corned Beef. Over the 
three-day weekend period our usual sales volume doubled. 
Jackson's show was the only promotion put behind the 
item. This proved to us that Jackson's appeal is not 
Just to teenagers, but to all age groups. 

These are just two instances among many to Illustrate 
the job that the personalities have done for Kroger. 

Please pass along our appreciation to all of your 

staff for the fine way in which they have handled Kroger 

s hows . 

Very truly yours, 



C'OC/gc 



Charles W. Conner, Manager 
Advertlsino. & Sales Promotion 



Use these WROV personalities and 
ROANOKE will love you! 
KEN TANNER • BARBARA FELTON 
JERRY JOYNES • JACK FISHER 
JIVIN' JACKSON 



WROV 

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA 

Burt Levine, President 



JLLY 1959 



65 



r z 1 

radio J Dimensions 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



U.S. radio sets now 
total 146 million 
including 48 million 
for out-of-home use 



Set location 


Number of sets 


Percent 


IN HOMES 


87,800,000 


60.1 


PORTABLES 


10,500,000 


7.2 


IN AUTOS 


37,900,000 


25.9 


IN PUBLIC PLACES 


10,000,000 


6.8 


TOTAL SETS 


146,200,000 


100.0 



Source: RAB. sets in working order. 



^i, ;:i!'-.:i!.-:: -.n- :jm uM Mil 1 " m m ! ^' .mm" i-' ;r .n- 1 .in ii:;: ; :m' !i> ;>i m;; ;ir :ii:, mii' ill mim . !ir -II " M! Mi :ii, 'ii: !l. :i!li :ii _\1 



End of May 1959 



Stations 
on air 



CPs not 
on air 



New station 
requests 



New station* 
bids in hearing 



AM 
FM 


1 3,366 1 118 1 
1 612 | 147 

End of May 1958 


526 1 
53 1 


159 
21 


AM 
FM 


1 3,248 1 92 1 
1 541 1 87 I 


406 1 

40 


107 

14 



Number of radio 
stations are up 
189 over 1958, 
total almost 4,000 



Source: FCC monthly reports, commercial stations. 'April each year. 

Illlllllllll!llllllll!llllllllllllllllllllll!!llill!lllllll!lllll^ 



Few new radios 
now end up in 
the living room 



jpiiiiiiiiiiiinii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiimiiii i iiiiii niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiililiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilliilj 

Location of new radios in "Telurbia" 



In house 



Bedroom 

38.7% 



Kitchen 

21.0% 



Portable 

13.3% 



Living room 

12.0% 



Other 

3.3% 



Outside house 



Auto, etc. 

11.7% 



Source: RAB, from study of densely-saturated tv area (Long Island, N. Y.). 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiii Minimi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ill lllllllllllli 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiimiiiiiimHiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiy 

Frequency loading of standard broadcast stations 



Year 


Number of on-air and 
authorized stations 


Increase in stations 
over previous year 


Average 

frequency 

loading 


1952 


2420 


+ 35 




23 


1953 


2584 


+ 164 




24 


1954 


2697 


+ 113 




25 


1955 


2840 


+143 




25 


1956 


3020 


+ 180 




28 


1957 


3238 


+218 




30 


1958 


3353 


+115 




31 



Source: Federal Radio Commission. 7th Annual Report, p. IS; Federal Communications Commission, 
Annual Reports ; All figures are as of 30 June. 

iiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimmmiiPimiiiimiiiiiimiiimiiiH Iilllliillllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllli 



Number of radio 
stations per channel 
(frequency) has 
climbed steadily 



66 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 




WHB dominates KANSAS CITY radio just about the way it does this ad 

For 5 years . . . on all surveys . . .in all time periods. . . in all seasons . . . WHB 
has dominated radio listening in Kansas City and environs. Naturally advertisers 
have followed audience . . . they've gotten results . . . they've renewed. Do you want 
to dominate Kansas City, too? Let Blair or G.M. George W. Armstrong fill you in. 






JsSr! iff 4 


| 


, ' g 

i 


WHB 

10,000 watts 
-710 kc. 
KANSAS CITY, 
MISSOURI 






| 



one 
of the 

STORZ 

Stations 

Todd Storz, President 

Home Office: Omaha 

WDGY Minneapolis- St. Paul 

WHB Kansas City 

KOMA Oklahoma City 

WTIX New Orleans 

WQAM Miami 



July 1959 



67 



y 



r z ] 

L RADIO J 

LZU SET PRODUCTION 

How radio set production varies year by year 



llll!!llllllllllll!l!ll!!ll!llllll!llllli!llllll!lllll!lllllil^ 

Total U.S. radio set production, 1924-58 



!i!ll!lllllllll[lllllllllPi!lll!ll!IJill'! !lli;iil!l!l![!l!l!lll!lilll!llll!![[[|ll!ll!l!!llllllllllg 




Year '24 '25 '26 '27 "28 '29 '30 '31 '32 '33 '34 '35 '36 '37 '38 '39 '40 '41 '42 '46 '47 '48 '49 '50 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 '56 '57 '58 
SOURCE: Electronic Industries Assn.. 1959 Fact Book. 

.~^';:ii^!: ", i. >„ -: j mi it 'i :i„ :l '; iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mmiimaiui iiiiiiiiiu mum i mm ummimiiimii imiiimi miiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



His 



Portable radio set sales hold up strongly 

m iiiHiiiiiiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiii iiiiimiiiiimiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii iimiiiiimii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiui| 



Radio set sales by type, 1947-58 



YEAR 



1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 



HOME 



CLOCK 



PORTABLE 



AUTO 



14.972.000 
10,325,000 
5,127,000 
7,818,000 
5,358,000 
4,394,000 
3,309,000 
2,701,000 
2,659,000 
3,007.000 
3.193,000 
2.669,000 



727,000 
1.666,000 
1,714,000 
1,897,000 
2,035.000 
2,223.000 
2.439,000 
2.205.000 



2,388,000 
2,585,000 
1.799,000 
1.593,000 
1.200,000 
1,528,000 
1.503,000 
1,449.000 
1,879,000 
2,683,000 
3.205.000 
3,115,000 



3,459,000 
4,240,000 
3,596.000 
4,740,000 
4,543,000 
3,243.000 
5,183,000 
4,124.000 
6,864,000 
5,057,000 
5.496.000 
3.715.000 



Source: EIA. Auto figures are factory production, all others are retail sales. Doss not include radio-phonograph combinations. 



-iiniimiiiiiiiimiiimmimniiiiii i iiiiiiiiiiiiini iiiimiiiniiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiimi imim mi 



TOTAL 



20,819,000 
17,150,000 
10,522,000 
14,151,000 
11,828,000 
10,831,000 
11,709,000 
10,170,000 
13,437,000 
12,970,000 
14,333,000 
11,704,000 



68 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



Beginning August 25, WANN 
with 10,000 Watts, becomes 
netropolitan Baltimore's 
nost powerful Negro 
Program Station! 

With WANN you'll get the metropolitan Baltimore Negro market 
AND the rich, responsive Negro Market of the entire Chesapeake 
Bay area! WANN, with 10,000 watts, becomes the most powerful and 
the largest Negro program station in the East! 




epresented by 

alker-Rawalt, Inc. 

47 Madison Ave., N.Y. 17, N.Y. 



Our 12 th Year of Success Jul Broadcasting 



Maryland's Capital Station 

ESTABLISHED IN 1947 
1190 ON YOUR DIAL 10,000 WATTS 

P.O. Box 631, Annapolis, Maryland 
Telephone: Colonial 3-2500 



July 1959 



69 



A 



r 2 1 

RADIO 

RADIO STATIONS AND THEIR REPRESENTATIVES 






Here's a handy list of reps for spot radio's am and f m stations 



■ or the timebuyer who wants to get in touch with 
a lot of stations in a hurry ( and what timebuyer doesn't 
at one time or another), here's a handy list. 

It contains am and fm stations with no information 
other than the state, city, call letters and name of the 
station's national representative. 

The listing does not contain all radio stations in the 
U.S. In the first place, stations with no national repre- 



sentative were excluded. What the list does is concen- 
trate on stations used by spot advertisers. This meant 
the further exclusion of many small market stations which 
live on local advertising. For the fm list, a more generous 
definition of spot radio's "universe" was made because 
of the relatively small number of fm outlets. 

Because of the complexity of such a listing, a few 
stations may be omitted — for which sponsor apologizes. 



AM & FM STATIONS AND THEIR NATIONAL REPS, 1 JULY 1959 



AM Stations 

ALABAMA 



Anniston 

WAN A mcgillvra 

WHMA walker-rawalt 

Birmingham 

WAPI _.._ _ christal 

WATV .._ bernard 

WBRC ... katz 

WCRT weed 

WEDR bob dore 

WENN pearson 

WEZB sears & ayer 

W.I f iD f orjoe 

WSGN v. r. & m. 

WVOK radio-tv 

WYDE young 

Decatur 

WHOS dark 

WMSL masla 

Dothan 

WAGF sears & ayer 

WDIG best 

WOOF Clark 

Gadsden 

WCAS r. v. h. 

WETO mcgillvra 

WGAD walker-rawalt 

Mobile 

W.VBB branham 

WAIP walker-rawalt 

WALA . h-r 

WGOK howard 

WKAB ..._ _. v. r. & m. 

WKRG avery-knodel 

WMOZ bob dore 

Montgomery 

WAPX boiling 

WBAM _._ radio-tv 

WCOV _ v. r. & m. 

WHHY masla 

WMGY stars national 

WRMA everett-mckinney 

Muscle Shoals 

WLAY walker-rawalt 



Selma 

WGWC holman 

WRWJ _ dark 

Tuscaloosa 

WACT grant webb 

WJR1) _ bob dore 

WNPT r. v. h. 



WTBC sears & ayer 

WTUG ... national time sis. 



ARIZONA 



Flagstaff 

KVNA . 



radio-tv 



Nogales 

KNOG best 

XEHP national time sis.; oakes 

Phoenix 

KBUZ young 

KHAT w. s. grant 

KIPN national time sis. 

KOOL, _ _ am radio sis. 

KOY _ _ blair 

KPHO _ katz 

KPOK -- .forjoe 

KRIZ radio-tv 

KRUX _ mcgavren 

KTAR avery-knodel 

Prescott 

KNOT ..._ masla 

KYCA avery-knodel 

Safford 

KGLU raymer 



Tucson 

KAIR branham 

KCEE forjoe 

KCNA gill-perna 

KCUB _ young 

KEVT national time sis. 

KMOP w. s. grant 

KOLD am radio sis. 

KTKT mcgavren' 

KTUC - radio-tv 

Yuma 

KVOY radio-tv 

KYUM avery-knodel 



ARKANSAS 

Fayetteville 

KFAY 

KHOG . 



bob dore 
walker-rawalt 



Fort Smith 

KFPW gill-perna 

KFSA v. r. & m. 

KTCS _ bob dore 

KWHN ..... r. v. h. 



Hot Springs 



KBHS dark 

KBLO _ _ .. r. v. h. 

KWFC ..._ _ ...v. r. & m. 



Jonesboro 

KBTM burn-smith 

KNEA gill-perna 



Little Rock 

KARK 

KGHI 

KLRA 

KNLR ... w. 

KOKY 



.... petry 

weed 

..h-r 
s. grant 
pearson 
KTHS ... christal 

KVLC o'connell 

KXLR boiling 



Pine Bluff 

KCLA best 

KOTN —walker-rawalt 

k'I'BA reilly (midw.l 

Texarkana 

KCMC - v. r. & m 

KOSY pearson 

KTFS walker-rawalt 



CALIFORNIA 

Avalon 

KBIG 



weed 



Bakersfield 

KAFY mcgavren 

KBIS weed 

KERN raymer! 

KGEE o'connell! 

KIKK _ _ boiling 

KLYD ..._.w. s. grant 

KMAP forjoe 

KPMC burn-smith 



Chico 

KHSL avery-knode 

KPAY ...hollingber) 

El Centro 

KAMP _ oake 

KXO rayme 

Eureka 

KENL w. s. gran 

KIEM hollingber 

KINS wee. 

Fresno 

KARM hollingber 

KBIF wee 

KEAP mcgavre 

KFRE bla 

KGST ..._ national time si 

KMAK meek 

KM J rayme 

KYNO headley-ree 



For the beginning of the fm list, see page 88 



AIR MEDIA BASIQ, 



Radio Buying is 
NOT a Toss-up! 




Little Rock 

and 

Central 
Arkansas 




Join the ranks of 
successful advertisers on: 

K V LC 

where: 

1. Imaginative programming, 

2. Top personalities, and 

3. Instant News coverage . . . 
combine to satisfy listeners 
and advertisers year after year! 







NATIONAL REPS.: 

• New York City 

Richard O'Connell, Inc. 

• Chicago 

William J. Reilly 

• Kansas City — St. Louis 

Jack Hetherington 



. . . and in nearby 

LAKE CHARLES, LA. 




Reaching a booming market of 250,000. 
Annual retail sales $200,000,000. 



Special 15% discount on this 

potent combination . . . 

KVLC, Little Rock + KIKS, Lake Charles 



Los Angeles 

KABC 

KAI.I 
KDAY 

KFAC 

K V 1 
KFWB 
KGIL 
KH.I 



katz 

o'conncll 

young 

boiling 

christal 

blair 

branham 

h-r 



KI.AC castman 



am radio sis. 
cbs spot 
forjoe 



KM PC 
KXX 
KPOL 
KPOP 

KTVM 

KWKW 

KXI.A 

Modesto 

K 1 1 E E .._ raymer 

KKI V hollingbery 

KTRB . mcgavren 



broadcast time sis. 

w. s. grant 

natioanl time sis. 

cooke 



good music brdcstrs. 



Polo Alto 
KIBE 

Pasadena 

KWKW national time sis. 

KXLA broadcast time sis. 

Redding 

KPAP w. s. grant 

KVCV _ avery-knodel 

KVIP hollingbery 



Riverside 

KACE 

KPRO _ 



walker-rawalt 
_. pearson 



Sacramento 

KCBA petry 

KFBK raymer 

KGMS - forjoe 

K ROY ..._ hollingbery 

KXOA mcgavnn 

Salinas 

Kin IX pearson 

KSBW mcgavren 

San Bernardino 

KCKC _... ._ grant webb 

KFXM _. ._ mcgavren 

KITO ..hollingbery 

KRNO boiling 

San Diego — Tijuana, Mex. 

KCBQ young 

KDKO eastman 

KF.MB petry 

KFSD katz 

KGB h-r 

KSDO mcgavren 

KSON headley-reed 

XEAK hollingbery; p. g. w. 

XEGM __ o'connell 

XEXX national time sis. 

San Fernando 

KGIL 



branham 



San Francisco — Oakland — Berkeley 

KABIj mcgavren 

KCBS __ cbs spot 

KEWB _ katz 

KFRC _.._. h-r 

KGO __._ blair 

KJBS boiling 

KLX _ weed 

KNBC nbc spot 

KOBY __. petry 

KOFY _ __ forjoe 

KRE w. s. grant 

KSAN howard 

KSAY raymer 

KSPO am radio sis. 

K W B R wa Iker- rawa 1 1 

KVA young 

San Jose 

KEEN 

KI.OK 
KSJO 
KXKX 



San Luis Obispo 



KATY 
KVEC 



hollingbery 

dark 

pearson 

mcgavren 



meeker 
mcgavren 



Santa Barbara 

km; 

KIST 
KTMS 

Santa Monica 
KDAY 



mcgavren 

hollingbery 

raymer 



mcgavren 



ttWKtv 

17 YEARS 

OF 

LEADERSHIP 

in the 

LOS ANGELES 
SPANISH 
MARKET 





ONLY 




24 HOUR 


SPANISH STATION 


IN 


THE U.S.A. 



With KWKW you 
can reach nearly 

700,000 

LOYAL LISTENERS 
SPENDING OVER 

$60,000,000 monthly 
BUY THE NO. 1 STATION 

* Spanish Pulse, April J 959 




S.F.— Theo. 8. Hall N.Y.— Natl Time Sales 



JULY 1959 



71 



WHEN YOU BUY 

Hartford 

Consider good sound radio 
Consider WINF for 



• Quality 

• Cost 

• Results 



Buy the station that delivers 
a quality audience because 
it provides quality program- 
ming more than 18 hours 
daily. 



WINF 

the information station covering 
one of America's important mar- 
kets from Manchester, Connecti- 
cut. 

Represented nationally by Chas. Bernard 



AM STATIONS 

Santa Rosa 

KSRO _ 

Stockton 



KJOY mcgavren 

KRAK ._.. headley-reed 

KSTX hollingbery 

K\V(, w. s. grant 



{continued from page 71) 
Wilmington 

mcgavren WAMS 

AY DEL 

WILM 

WJBR _ 

WTl'X 



Tulare 

KOOK pearson 

KGEX _ for joe 



Ventura 

KUDU 
KYEX 



continental radio sis. 
grant webb 



Visalia 

KONG -- 



hollingbery 



COLORADO 

Colorado Springs 

KPIK - bernard 

KRDO - pearson 

KVOR v. r. & m. 

KWBY - radio-tv 

KYSN _ avery-knodel 



Denver 

KDEN 

KFML 

KFSC . 

KGMC 

KHOW 

KIMN 

KLAK 

KLIR 

KLZ ... 

KMYR 

KOA .. 

KOSI 

KTLX 

KUDY 



breen 6 ward 

meeker 

national time sis. 

radio-tv 

P- g- w. 

avery-knodel 

bernard 

_ best 

_ katz 

_ young 

- christal 

petry 

blair 

w. s. grant 



Pueblo 

KCSJ - ... meeker 

KDZA devney 

KFEL ... continental radio sis.; w. s. grant 



K i . I i F 



CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 

WICC 

WXAB ...... 



gill-perna 



young 

mcgavren 



Hartford 

wccc 

WDRC 



.walker-rawalt 
raymer 



WINK (Manchester) _ bernard 

WPOP young 

WTIC christal 



pearson 
mcgavren 



New Britain 

WHAY .... 

WKXB 

New Haven 

YVAYZ hollingbery 

WELI h-r 

WXHC mcgavren 

New London 

WNLC reilly 

WSUB walker-rawalt 



Norwich 




WICH 


everett-mckinney 


Stamford 




WSTC 


... everett-mckinney 


Torrington 




WBZY 

WTOR 


breen & ward 

. r. v. h. 



Waterbury 



WATR . mcgavren 

WBRY o'connell 

W'WCO .... masla 



DELAWARE 

Georgetown 

WJWL 



eastman 
meeker 
boiling 



fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 
walker-rawalt 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WARL (Arlington) bernard 

WEAM (Arlington) broadcast time sis. 

WGMS avery-knodel 

WMAL h-r 

WOL headley-reed 

WOOK united 

WPGC _ forjoe 

WRC _ _ nbc spot 

WTOP .-.- cbs spot 

W U ST pearson 

WWDC _ -- - blair 



FLORIDA 

Cypress Gardens 

YvGTO _ petry 



Daytona Beach 



WMF J 
WXDB 
"WROD 



.... masla 

dark 

pearson 



Fort Lauderdale 

WFTL _..._ 

WWIL 



Fort Myers 

WINK ...... 

Gainesville 

WDVH .... 

Vv'GGG 

WRUF 



masla 
r. v. h. 



walker-rawalt 



Jacksonville 

WAPE 

WIVY 

WJAX 

WMBR 

WOBS 

Wl'DQ ...... 

WQIK 



everett-mckinney 

_ best 

burn-smith 



radio-tv 

masla 

headley-reed 
blair 

gill-perna 

... v. r. & m. 
forjoe 



WRHC _ .....wootton 

WTTT ...raymer 

WZOK eastman 



Lakeland 

WLAK . 
WOXX . 



_ _ pearson 

cooke 

WYSE _ dark 



Miami — Miami Beach 

WAME 

WCKR 

WFEC 

WGBS -- 

YV'INZ 

WKAT 

WMBM 

WHET 

WMIE 

WQAM 

WSKP 



mcgavren 

christal 

_ _ bob dore 

-- katz 

petry 

masla 

_ pearson 

forjoe 

bernard 

blair 

h-r 

WVCG good music brdcstrs.; dark 



Orlando 

WABR 
WD BO 
WHIY 
WHOO 



gill-perna 

_ blair 

_ pearson 

_ v. r. & m. 

WLOF stars national 



Panama City 

WDLP _. ...hollingbery 

WPCF _ _ ...walker-rawalt 

Pensacola 

WBOP r. v. h 

WBSR - v. r. & m. 

WCOA hollingbery 

WPFA bob dore 



masla 



continental brdcstg. 



Sanford 

WIOD 

Sarasota — Bradenton 

WBRD meeker 

WKXY dark 

WSPB ... pearson 

WTRL .__ best 

Tallahassee 

WMEX weei 

{Please turn to page 74) 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 





WTIC 

GREATEST COVERAGE 








































IN RICH, RICH 
SOUTHERN 
NEW ENGLAND 

WTIC 50,000 watts 

HARTFORD 15, CONNECTICUT Tel: JAckson 5-0801 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY HENRY I. CHRISTAL COMPANY 




buLY 1959 



AM STATIONS 



[continued from page 72) 



WTAL 

WTXT 



meeker 
devney 



Tampa — St. Petersburg 

WALT 

WDAE 

WFLA 

WIIBO 

WILZ _ 

WPIN 

WSUN 

WTAX 

WTMP 

WTSP _. . .. _ 



avery-knodel 

kati 

blair 

bernard 

masla 

walker-rawalt 

v. r. & m. 

devney 

pearson 

_. weed 



._ weed 

dark 

meeker 

stars national 



West Palm Beach 

WE AT 

WIRK __ 

WJ.NO _ 

WQXT 



GEORGIA 

Albany 

WALB burn-smith 

WGPC - hollingbery 

WJAZ dark 

Athens 

WDOL _ dark 

WGAU pearson 

WRFC _ ._.. bob dore 

Atlanta 

WAGA 

WAKE 

WAOK 

WEAS 

WERD 

WGKA _ 

WGST 

WIIN 

WPLO _ 

WQXI 

WSB 

WYZE 



WBIA 

WGAC 

WGUS 


walker-rawalt 

- avery-knodel 


WRDW . 




Columbus 

WCLS 
WDAK 


walker-rawalt 


WGBA 




WPNX . 




WRBL 




Gainesville 

WDUN 


clark 


WGGA 


r. v. h 


WLBA 




La Grange 

WLAG 




WTRP 





KFXD 
KGEM 
KIDO 

KY1IE 



Idaho Falls 

KID 

KIFI 

KUPI 



pearson 

avery-knodel 

weed 

— meeker 



walker-rawalt 

avery-knodel 

w. s. grant 



Macon 

WBML __ forjoe 

WCRY stars national 

WIBB _ walker-rawalt 

WMAZ avery-knodel 

WNEX branham 



Lewiston 

KOZE . 
KRLC . 



Pocatello 

KSEI ... 
KWIK .. 
KYTE ... 



gill-perna 
united 



weed 

..avery-knodel 

continental radio sis. 



Rome 

WRGA 

WHOM 



walker-rawalt 
devney 



_ katz 

young 

mcgavren 

stars national 

wootton 

good music brdcstrs. 

branham 

weed 

radio-tv 

gill-perna 

petry 

r. v. h. 



Augusta 

WATTG -- __ r. v. h. 

WBBQ everett-mckinney 



Savannah 

WCCP walker-rawalt 

WJIY .stars national 

WSAV eastman 

WSGA hollingbery 

WSOK __ walker-rawalt 

WT( >C avery-knodel 

Valdosta 

WG AF pearson 

WGOV stars national 



IDAHO 

Boise 

KBOI 



Twin Falls 

KLIX ...avery-knodel 

KTFI _ _ weed 



ILLINOIS 

Champaign — Urbana 

WDWS 

WKID 

Chicago 

WAAF 

WAIT _._ 

\YBBM 



meeker 
pearson 



forjoe 



p. g- w. 



_ _ _ avery-knodel 

.. cbs spot 

WBEE continental brdctng. 

WCFL mcgavren 

WEAW good music brdcstrs. 

WGN petry 

WIND am radio sis. 

WJJD _ radio-tv 

WLS - blair 

WMAQ nbc spot 

WSBC devney 

Danville 

WD AN everett-mckinney 

WITY burn-smith 




How to sell 
New York's 

CAPTIVATED 

audience 

What makes a radio audience 
responsive? For one thing, the way 
listeners listen. WQXR's good music 
format compels active, attentive 
listening, captivates more 
than one million families, makes 
sales for over 400 advertisers. 
For listeners and advertisers alike, 
WQXR is America's Number 
One Good Music Station. Ask us to 
send you some case histories. 



WQXR 



AM 50,000 watts 
and FM 



74 



Radio Station oj The New York Times 



AIR MEDIA BASIC 



Decatur 

WDZ _. 
WSOY .. 

Evanston 

W E A W 
WN'MP 



p. g. w. 
weed 



good music brdcstrs. ; grant webb 
devney 



Galesburg 

WGIL 
WQUB _ 

Jolict 

WJOL __ 

La Grange 

WTAQ _. 



r. v. h. 
hollingbery 



pearson 



' 






Moline 

WQUA 

Oak Park 

WOPA .... 

Peoria 

WEEK . 
WIRL ... 
WMBD 
WPEO . 

Quincy 

WGEM . 

WTAI) . 

Rockford 

WROK 

\YRRR . 



Rock Island 

WHBF ... 



Springfield 

wcvs .... 

WMAY .... 
WTAX .... 



bernard 



hollingbery 



howard 



headley-reed 

h-r 

P- g- w. 
young 



young 
weed 



h-r 

radio-tv 



avery-knodel 



weed 

pearson 

gill-perna 



INDIANA 

Elkhart 
WCMR .. . 
WTRC _.. 

Evansville 

WEOA 

WiiBF 

W I KY 

WJ PS 



best; grant webb 
... h-r 



ill-perna 

weed 

pearson 

boiling 



Fort Wayne 

WANE 

WGL - 

W'K.JG 

1VOWO ... 

Gary 



petry 

headley-reed 

h-r 

am radio sis. 



WGRY 
WWCA 



grant webb 
... pearson 

Indianapolis 

WFBM katz 

'M', 1 /. 1 / continental brdcstg. 

— blair 

- - P- g- *• 

pearson 



WIBC 
WIRE 
WISH 
WXLW 



Kokomo 

WIOU ..... 

Muncie 

WI.BC 
WMUN 

South Bend 

W.IV\ 

WNDU 

WSBT 



Terre Haute 



weed 



holman 

walker-rawalt 



r. v. h. 

petry 

raymer 



WBOW 
WMPT 
WTHI 



it IOWA 



Cedar Rapids 
ECRG .. 

KPIG 

WMT 



weed 

burn-smith 

boiling 



branham 

devney 

katz 



Davenport 

KSTT 

woe 

Des Moines 
KCBC 

KIOA 

KRNT 

K'Sli 
Will) 

Dubuque 

KDTII 

WDBQ 



forjoe 
p. g. w. 



devney 

young 

katz 

h-r 

p. g. w. 



pearson 
walker-rawalt 



Fort Dodge 

KVKI) 
KWMT 



pearson 
everett-mckinney 



Mason City 
KGLO . 

KKIB 

KSMX 

Ottumwa 

KBIZ 

KI.EK 



weed 

gill-perna 

best 



Shenandoah 



K V \ !•' 
K.MA 



avery-knodel 
walker-rawalt 



h-r 
petry 



Sioux City 

K M X S 

KSCJ 

KTR I 

Waterloo 

KWWL _ 
KXEL 



KANSAS 

Coffeyville 

KGGF 

Colby 

KXXX 

Concordia 

KFR.M 



raymer 

hollingbery 
everett-mckinney 



avery-knodel 
boiling 



hollingbery 



Dodge City 
KGNO 

Great Bend 
KVGB 



h-r 



v. r. £r m. 



hollingbery 



Hutchinson 

KWBW .... 
KWIIK 

Pittsburg 

KOAM .... 
KSKK 

Topeka 

K.I AY 
KTOP 

\yii;\y 
WREN 

Wichita 

KAKE ...... 

KFBI 

k I ■' 1 1 

KLEO 

KSIU 
KW'BB 



devney 
everett-mckinney 



hollingbery 
avery-knodel 



gill-perna 

megavren 

avery-knodel 

hollingbery 



v. r. & m. 

avery-knodel 

blair 

eastman 

pearson 

hollingbery 



KENTUCKY 

Ashland 

WCMI 
WTCR 



Frankfort 

WIKY 



Hopkinsville 

WHOP 
WKdA 

Lexington 

WBLG 

WI.AP 
WVLK 



pearson 
bernard 



hollingbery 



masla 
hopewell 



meeker 

pearson 

hollingbery 



k-TOP 



IN THE 









■> 



OF KANSAS 




40.4 MORNING 
42.3 EVENING 

Latest Hooper 

41 QUARTER HOURS 1sts 

MORE THAN 
ALL OTHER STATIONS COMBINED 

Latest Pulse 




1490 ON THE DIAL 



JUL\ 1959 




Livewire KSO RADIO is setting a new 
Pulse pace in Des Moines and Cen- 
traliowa! Now topping three network 
stations — and most quarter-hour 
gains of all stations: 

KSO is up 42 from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
This whopping climb is against a 
gain of only 5 for network station 
'R' and zero for independent station 
'I' 

(Mon. thru Fri. — Pulse May 1958 — 
March 1959) 

Hooper up, too, 68% 

And you still get that low, low cost 
per mmmmmmmmm! 

In DES MOINES and CENTRALIOWA, 
BUY 




IARRY BENTSON TONY MOE JOE FLOYD 

President Vice-Pres., Vice-P;es. 

Cen. Mgr. 



AM STATIONS 

Louisville 



WAKY 
WAVE 



blair 
nbc spot 



WHAS - — - — christal 

W I XN - avery-knodel 

WKLO -— - eastman 

WKYW - - pearson 

WLOU - pearson 

WTJIT — meeker 

Paducah 

W 1 >XR — - retlly 

WKYB - boiling 

WPAD — - howard 



LOUISIANA 



continued from page 75) 

WFBR - - - -blair 

WITH — - select 

WSID ._.- -~ united 

WWIN bob ° ore 

Cumberland 

WCUM - c ' ark 

WTBO - bran ham 

Frederick 

WFMD - — - gill-perna 

Salisbury 

WBOC - burn-smith 

W ICO ----- - - uni , ted . 

WJDY _.. - - clark 



Alexandria 

KALB - weed 

KSYL - everett-mckinney 



Baton Rouge 

WAIL 

WIBR -.. 

WJBO 

WLCS 



weed 

forjoe 

hollingbery 
masla 



WXOK - - howard 

Lafayette 

KPEL -- — - o'connell 

KVOL meeker 

Lake Charles 

KAOK „ -... — howard 

KIKS - - o'connell 

KLOU _.. ..united 

KPLC - weed 

Monroe 

KMLB ..... pearson 

KXOE - - h-r 

KUZN -- '■ v. h. 

New Orleans 

WBOK howard 

WDSU - - blair 

WJBW - - .....o'connell 

WJMR — forjoe 

WNOE avery-knodel 

WSMB hollingbery 

WTIX ._ - young 

WWL katz 

WYFE - boiling 

WYLD _. - pearson 

Shreveport 

KAXB bob wittig; oakes 

KBCL hopewell 

KX'IJ - bernard 

KEEL -.- - blair 

KENT walker-rawalt 

KJOE o'connell 

KOKA _ pearson 

KRMD weed 

KWKH christal 



MAINE 

Augusta 

WFAU o'connell 

WRDO - ...weed 

Bangor 

WABI hollingbery 

WGUY — — - o'connell 

WLBZ - - weed 

Portland 

WCSH weed 

WGAN - avery-knodel 

WLOB - - o'connell 

WPOR - - hollingbery 



Presque Isle 

WAGM 



hollingbery 



MARYLAND 

Annapolis 

WABW - - - - bernard 

WNAV - — — headley-reed 

Baltimore 

WANX (Annapolis) walker-rawalt 

WAQE for l°e 

WAYE pearson 

WBAL christal 

WBMD -... - bernard 

WCAO - ...radio-tv 

WCBM - -P- S- w. 

WEBB — - howard 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston 

WBZ . 
WCOP 
WCRB 



am radio sis. 
radio-tv 






_ broadcast time sis. 

WEE I '. _1_ -L~~- ----- - ,? SS J">* 

WEZE — hollingbery 

WHDH 



blair 



WHIL 

WILD . 

WLYN 

WMEX 

WNAC 

WORL 

WTAO 



grant webb 
bob dore 



walker-rawalt 

young 

h-r 

...headley-reed 
o'connell 



Fitchburg 

WEIM - walker-rawalt 

WFGM —'.'.—- - ...everett-mckinney 

New Bedford 

WBSM - - --;--- boiling 

W N B H - walker-rawalt 

Pittsfield 

WBEC - everett-mckinney 

WBRK - walker-rawalt 



Springfield — Holyoke — Chicopee 



WBZ A ... 

WHYN ... 

WMAS — 

WSPR - 

WTXL .... 

WTYM .. 

Worcester 



am radio sis. 

branham 

boiling 

. hollingbery 
walker-rawalt 

avery-knodel 



WAAB 

W N E B 

WORC 

WTAG . chnstal 



eastman 

...boiling 

avery-knodel 



MICHIGAN 



Ann Arbor 



WHRV 
WPAG 



devney 

..everett-mckinney 



Battle Creek 

WBCK 

WELL 



hollingbery 
... mcgavren 



Bay City 

WBCM 
WWBC 



hollingbery 
masla 



Detroit 

nK - T w eastman 

war zzzzz: zz. am radio ,i, 

£^ B - zzz .christal 

wkmh zzzzz - -- *y 

w^z zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz&I 



Escanaba 

WDBC . 



bob dore 



Flint 

WAMM - gi "' P ^H 

WBBC 

WFDF 



WKMF — 
WMRP - 
WTAC .... 



weed 

kati 

..mcgavren 
sears & ayer 
hollingbery 



Grand Rapids 



76 



mr .T, n gill-perna 

%%?==- -•«££:* 

wlav - -- - m r c a g d n v 

W M AX — - rad ?. t " 

WOOD - --- Ka " 

(Please turn to page 78) 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 



ARE WE "SELLING" FOR YOU? 



1 



OUR STORY 



w 



• The "COUNTRY MUSIC NETWORK" is available from Coast-to-Coast! 

• This Spot Network is flexible, and can be tailored to suit your needs . . . 

• Many Stations can be bought with a single purchase-order, payable with just one monthly 
check . . . 

• The much-desired single package-rate is in effect . . . 

• Our first Success Story, is our best $uccess $tory - SINCLAIR REFINING CO. recently re- 
newed the COUNTRY MUSIC NETWORK for a second 52-week cycle . . . 

• Selling to over half the Nation's population! ! ! 

• All of our stations specialize in merchandising and promotion. 





. Ft. Worth-Dallas 


OUR NETWOR 


K 




KCUL . 


WABB 


. . Mobile 


KWAM . 


. Memphis 


KRCT . 


. Houston 


KCIJ 


. . Shreveport 


WENO . 


. Nashville 


KDAV . 


. Lubbock 


WMIE 


. . Miami 


WTAQ . 


. Chicago 


KZIP . 


. Amarillo 


WHBO 


. . Tampa 


WEXL . 


. Detroit-Royal Oak 


KHAT . 


. Phoenix 


WOOO 


. . Daytona Beach-DeLand 


WREM . 


. Utica-Rome-Remsen, N. Y. 


KMOP . 


. Tucson 


WQIK 


. . Jacksonville 


WCBG . 


. Chambersburg, Pa. 


KPIK . 


. Colorado Springs 


WPFA 


. . Pensacola 


WAVL . 


. Pittsburgh-Apollo 


KLAK . 


. Denver 


KEVE 


. . Minneapolis-St. Paul 


WLDB . 


. Atlantic City 


KSOP . 


. Salt Lake City 


K000 


. . Omaha 


WBMD . 


. Baltimore 


KKEY . 


. Portland, Ore. 


KCKN 


. . Kansas City 


WABW . 


. Annapolis, Md. 


WEAS . 


. Atlanta 


WEW 


. . St Louis 


WARL . 


. Washington, D. C. 


WPNX . 


. Columbus, Ga. 


KLRA 


. . Little Rock 


WCMS . 


. Norfolk 


WJIV . 


. Savannah, Ga. 


WKXV 


. . Knoxville 


WTCR . 


. Huntington, W. Va.-Ashland, Ky 


WATV . 


. Birmingham 


WFSC 

• • 


. . Franklin, N. C. 
. and still growing . . . 


WMPM . 


. Smithfield, N. C. 



SINCLAIR 

FORD 

DELCO 

POST CEREALS 

UNITED FRUIT 

MILLER'S HIGH LIFE 

FOLGER'S COFFEE 

READER'S DIGEST 

AMERICAN CYANAMID 



OUR CLIENTS 



**f 



QUAKER OATS 

PET MILK 

AMOCO 

BORDEN'S 

GENERAL FOODS 

ROI-TAN 

PITTSBURGH PAINT 

AMERICAN MOLASSES 

REGIMEN 



"The above is a partial list of clients, that 
purchased campaigns on one or more of the 
above stations . . . 



LEVER BROTHERS 

PHILIP MORRIS 

LINCOLN-MERCURY 

DuPONT 

KENT CIGARETTES 

C & P TELEPHONE 

GENERAL CIGAR 

LYDIA PINKHAM 

CONTINENTAL BAKING 

NOXZEMA 



LIFE MAGAZINE 

BEECH-NUT GUM 

GULF 

UPTON'S TEA 

GREYHOUND 

ROBERT HALL 

MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE 

STERLING-WARNER 

UNION CARBIDE CHEMICALS 

ESSO 




Charles Bernard Company, Inc. 

STATION REPRESENTATIVES 

730 FIFTH AVENUE. NEW YORK 19 
CIRCLE 6-7242 




AM STATIONS 

Inkster 

W CHB _ 

Jackson 

WIBM 

WKHM 



{continued 



bob dore 



_ weed 

mcgavren 



Kalamazoo 

WKLZ 

WK.MI 

WKZO 

Lansing 

W1LS 

WJIM 

Muskegon 

WKBZ 

WMUS 

WTRU .... 

Saginaw 

WKNX 

WSAXI 

WSGW 

MINNESOTA 



radio- tv 

broadcast time sis. 
avery-knodel 



r. & m. 
p. g. w. 



mcgavren 

r. v. h. 



gill-perna 



gill-perna 

.....mcgavren 

pearson 



Dulu Hi 

KDAL _ __ avery-knodel 

WEBC hollingbery 

Mankato 

KTOE 

K Y SM 



pearson 

meeker 



Minneapolis-St. Paul 

KEVE _ weed 

KRSI _ radio-tv 

KSTP _ ... petry 

WCCO cbsspot 



WDGY 
WISK 
WLOL 
WMIN 
WPBC 
WTCN 



blair 
boiling 
am radio sis. 

gill-perna 

mcgavren 

_ katz 



Rochester 

KROC ... 
KWEB ... 

St. Cloud 

KFAM 
WJON .. 



meeker 

avery-knodel 



pearson 
r. v. h. 



MISSISSIPPI 

Biloxi — Gulfport 

WLOX holman 

WVJII national time sis.; sears & ayer 

Greenville 

WDDT everett-mckinney 

WGVM devney 

WJPR _ - bogner & martin 



from page 76) 
Hattiesburg 

WBKH ...devney 

WPOR r. v. h. 

WHSY dark 

Jackson 

WJDX hollingbery 

WJQS devney 

WJXN masla 

WOKJ pearson 

WRBC ..... _ r. v. h. 

WSLI weed 

Laurel 

WAML hollingbery 

WLAU __ devney 

WNSL grant webb 

Meridian 

WDAL indie sis. 

WMOX everett-mckinney 

WOKK _. grant webb 

WQIC united 

MISSOURI 

Cape Girardeau 

KGMO grant webb 

KFVS head Icy-reed 

Columbia 

KBIA best 

KFRU grant webb 

Fulton 

KFAL pearson 

Hannibal 

KHMO _ hollingbery 

Jefferson City 

KLIK hollingbery 

KWOS .._. grant webb 

Joplin 

KFSB meeker 

KODE .... r. v. h. 

WMBH sears & ayer 

Kansas City 

KANS branham 

KBKN grant webb 

KCMO _ katz 

KMBC p. g. w. 

KPRS ._ pearson 

KUDL young 

WDAF christal 

WHB blair 

St. Joseph 

KFEQ _ v. r. & m. 

KRES _ dark 

KUSN pearson 

St. Louis 

KADY broadcast time sis. 

KATZ continental brdcstg. 



KMOX ... _ _ cbsspot 

KSD _ nbcspot 

KSTL ... forjoe 



KWK 
KXLW . 

KXOK 

WAMV 

WEW 

WIL 



Sedalia 

KDRO 

KSIS .. 



headley-reed 

stars national 

blair 

weed 

boiling 

eastman 



pearson 
dark 



Springfield 

KGBX _ 

KTTS . 

KWTO 

MONTANA 



Billings 

KBMY . 

KGHL . 

KOOK . 

KOYN .. 

Bozeman 



. r. & m. 

weed 

pearson 



KBMN 

KXXL 



..avery-knodel 

katz 

walker-rawalt 
united 



gill-perna 

walker-rawalt 



Butte 

KBOW '_ cooke 

KOPR avery-knodel 

KXLF walker-rawalt 

Great Falls 

KFBB boiling 

KMON _ avery-knodel 

KUDI __ ..united 

KXLK ...walker-rawalt 

Helena 

KCAP grant webb 

KXLJ walker-rawalt 

Missoula 

KGYO 

KXLL 



gill-perna 

walker-rawalt 



ST. LOUIS' NUMBER ONE NEWS AN 

delivers top sales results with . . . 

1. St. Louis' largest news staff — nine experienced news men 
equipped with the best and largest available selection of 
news-gathering facilities. 

2. KSD-RADIO's roster of popular LOCAL programs. 

3. St. Louis' top air sales personalities — Ed Wilson, Russ David 
and Bill Crable. 

4. NBC's outstanding variety programs and famous "News- 
on-the-Hour". 

5. KSD's live audience, most merchandisable program — Russ 
David's "Playhouse Party". 

6. The largest consistent coverage — serving 72 counties — with 
KSD's 550 spot on the dial. 

nnra e,as,c 

uJLJlJ affiliate 

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH RADIO STATION -WP% 



NEBRASKA 

Grand Island 

KMMJ _ h-r 

KRGI _... gill-perna 

Kearney 

KGFW holman 

KRNY pearson 

Lincoln 

KFOR raymer 

KLIN everett-mckinney 

KLMS - burn -smith 

Omaha 

KBON mcgavren 

KFAB ...petry I 



rrYSTATioN 




REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY NBC SPOT SALES 



On everu dial 



78 



AIR MEDIA BASIC 



KOIL 

KOOO 

KOWH 

WOW 



avery-knodel 

evcrett-mckinney 

._ - young 

blair 



Scottsbluff 

KNEB 

KOLT 



NEVADA 

Henderson 



ki;.\u 
K'l'nu 



holman 
gill-perna 



forjoc 
pearson 



Las Vegas 

KENO _ r. v. h.; blair; forjoe 

KI.AS _ _ weed 

KORK avery-knodel 

KRAM o'connell; reilly 

KRBO holman 

Reno 

KATO walker-rawalt; broadcast time-sis. 

raymer 



KOH 

B ( > N i ■: 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Hanover 



WDCR 

WTSL 

Keene 

WKNE 

Laconia 

WLNH 



headley-reed 
. pearson 



breen & ward 
radio-tv 



meeker 



Manchester 

WFEA 

W(JIR 

WKBR 



walker-rawalt 



raymer 

o'connell 

radio-tv 



NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

WFPG 

WLDB _ 

WMII) _ 

' WOND _ 



walker-rawalt 

bernard 

stars national 
forjoe 



Newark 

wx.ii; 
WNTA 
WVNJ 



continental brdcstg. 

mcgavren 

_ broadcast time sis. 



New Brunswick 
WCTC - 

Paterson 

Wi'AT 

Trenton 

WBUD 

WTNJ 

WTTM .. .. 



grant webb 



weed 



bob wittig 

forjoe 

.. hollingbery 



NEW MEXICO 

Albuquerque 

K'AHO national time sis.; oakes 

KDEF .._ boiling 

1 G6M __ branham 

KHAM _ continental radio sis. 

KLOS — _ _ bob dore 

KOB petry 

KQEO eastman 

Carlsbad 

|AVE _ branham 

KPBM _ .__ devney 

Roswell 

KIU.M 
K(JPL 

KSWs 

Santa Fe 

KTRC 



KVSF 



dark 

branham 

meeker 



devney 
branham 



NEW YORK 

'Albany — Schenectady — Troy 

IW \ BY forjoe 
WGY ___ christal 



The station for whirl -wind 

sales action! 




THE FAMILY STATION 



5000 WATTS 

NEW YORK 



WWRL 

beamed to sell 

New York's 

2,455,000 

Negroes 

& 

Puerto Ricans 



WWRL . . . puts the act in action by speaking 
the language of New York's ever-expanding 
Negro and Puerto Rican market. Top personali- 
ties sell your product 24 hours a day. Get in 
the sales whirl ... buy WWRL. 

MERCHANDISING PLUS: Ask about our 
"geared-to-sell" merchandising plan. 



On the air 24 hours 
DE 5-1600 



FREE REPORT 

NEGRO MARKET IN NEW YORK 
POPULATION STUDY 



chw$e my x v 
spots io 

wtuc 

Here's a wise buyer. He's che 
every survey and found in the 

WILKES-BARRE MARKET more peopl 
listen to WILK in the morning 
than any other station. 

He asked why, and found this— 

jfc Outstanding station personaliti 

^C Top ABC network programming 

jfc Local programming that meets 
community 





w WILKES-BARRE, PA. Call Avery-Knodel for details. 
The only A.B.N. Affiliate in Northeastern Pennsylvania 



July 1959 



79 



FIRST 
ON 
YOUR 
DIAL 



wmca 

THE VOICE OF NEW YORK 

Call us collect at MUrray Hill 8-1500 
Or contact AM Radio Sales. 



AM STATIONS 

I continued from page 79) 

WOK (I branham 

W'l'TK eastman 

WROW avery-knodel 

WSNY forjoe 

WTRY blair 

Bingham ton — Endicott 

WINR everett-mckinney 

WKOP boiling 

WNBF .... blair 

Buffalo — Niagara Falls 

WBEX christal 

WBXY _.. masla 

WEBB _ katz 

WGR petry 

WHLD head ley-reed 

WINE „ . howard 

W.I.I L _ burn-smith 

WKBW _ avery-knodel 

WNIA walker-rawalt 

WWOL forjoe 



Corning 

WCBA 
WCLI . 



Hempstead 

WHLI 



devney 
cooke 



gill-perna 



masla 

v. r. & m. 



Ithaca 

WHCU 

WTKO - 

Jamestown 

WJOC burn-smith 

WJTX .... v. r. & m. 

Kingston 

WKNY •. meeker 

New York City 

WABC blair 

WBNX king 

WCBS cbs spot 

WINS ...katz 

WL.IB forjoe 

WMCA _ am radio sis. 

WMGM ... „ hollingbery 

WNEW eastman 

WOR ._. _ h-r 

W( >Y pearson 

WPAT - _ _ weed 

WQXR _ raymer 

WRCA _ _ _ nbc spot 



Olean 

WHDL everett-mckinney 

WJIXS clarke; grant webb 

Pittsburgh 



WEAV 
WIRY 



masla 
mcgavren 



Rochester 

WBBF ... 
WHAM .. 
WHEC -. 
WRYM 
WSAY 



v. r. & m. 

.... christal 

everett-mckinney 
. headley-reed 
grant webb 



WYET ... boiling 

Syracuse 

WFBL hollingbery 

WHEN katz 

WXDR _ _ _ blair 

WOLF v. r. & m. 

WSYR - christal 

Utica — Rome 

WIBX meeker 

WKA1, h-r 



WRUN ... _ avery-knodel 

WTLB v. r. & m. 

Walton 

WDLA . r. v. h. 

Watertown 

WATX devney 

WWNY weed 

White Plains 

WFAS headley-reed 

NORTH CAROLINA 
Ashe vi lie 

WISE broadcast time sis. 

Wl.dS ... p. g. w. 

I Please turn to page 82) 



Negro 

pulse* 

report 

again 

establishes 

r) 

NEW YORK'S 

n o 





NEGRO 
STATION 



*Based on TOTAL 2U 
HOUR LISTENERSHIP 
to ALL Negro programs 

(Pulse, Oct. 1958) 

WLIB — has more Negro listeners than any other 
N.Y. radio station — network or independent 
(Pulse) 

WLIB — only N.Y. radio station with studios in 
Harlem 

WLIB— first N.Y. station broadcasting Negro 
community news and special events on a regu- 
larly scheduled basis — every hour on the half 
hour 

WLIB— only N.Y. station devoting 87% of its 
broadcast time to Negro programming 



HARLEM RADIO CENTER 

2090 Seventh Ave., New York 27 
MO 6-1800 



80 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



/BBF 

Always First 



is Basic in Rochester 



50 ° ut ° 



f 

weekly 
liter hours. 



50 



'IBF has 34% more 
>IULT listeners than 
iv other station. 



irst Call 
WBBF 



IN 
ROCHESTER 






e ard Rintoul McConneli 

DURCE: Pulse Inc. Mon.-Fri.-Mar. '59 
JULY 1959 



6:00 AM 


6:15 AM 


6:30 AM 


6:45 AM 


7:00 AM 


7:15 AM 


7:30 AM 


7:45 AM 


WBBF 2.4 


WBBF 3.0 


WBBF 3.4 


WBBF 4.4 


W8BF 6.2 


WBBF 7.0 


W8BF 7.8 


WBBF 7.6 


STA. C 2.2 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. B 3.0 


STA. C 4.0 


STA. C 5.6 


STA. C 5.8 


STA B 6.2 


STA. 6 6.4 


STA. B 1.4 


STA. B 1.8 


STA. C 3.0 


STA. B 3.6 


STA. B 5.0 


STA. B 5.0 


STA. C 6.0 


STA. C 6.2 


STA. D .6 


STA. E 1.0 


STA. E 1.4 


STA. E 1.8 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. E .6 


STA. D .8 


STA. D 1.2 


STA. D 1.4 


STA. E 2.0 


STA. D 2.2 


STA. E 2.2 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. F .2 


STA. F .4 


STA. F .4 


STA. F .8 


STA. F .8 


STA. F 1.2 


STA. F 1.0 


STA. F 1.2 


8:00 AM 


8:15 AM 


8:30 AM 


8:45 AM 


9:00 AM 


9:15 AM 


9:30 AM 


9:45 AM 


WBBF 8.4 


WBBF 8.0 


WBBF 7.4 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 6.8 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 7.2 


WBBF 7 2 


STA. B 7.0 


STA. B 6.8 


STA. B 6.6 


STA. B 7.0 


STA. B 6.2 


STA. B 6.0 


STA. B 5.4 


STA. C 5.0 


STA. C 6.4 


STA. C 6.0 


STA. C 6.2 


STA. C 5.6 


STA. C 6.0 


STA. C 5.6 


STA. C 5.2 


STA. B 4 8 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 3.0 


STA. E 3.2 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 2.2 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. F 1.0 


STA. F 1.0 


STA. F .8 


STA. F .8 


STA. F 1.0 


STA. F 1.2 


STA. F 1.2 


STA. F 1.4 


10:00 AM 


10:15 AM 


10:30 AM 


10:45 AM 


11:00 AM 


11:15 AM 


11:30 AM 


11:45 AM 


WBBF 7.4 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 7.2 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 7.4 


WBBF 7.4 


WBBF 7.6 


WBBF 7.4 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. B 4.4 


STA. B 4.8 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. B 4.0 


STA. B 3.8 


STA. B 3.6 


STA. B 3 6 


STA. C 4.6 


STA. C 4.4 


STA. C 3.8 


STA. C 4.0 


STA. C 3.6 


STA. C 3.2 


STA. C 3.4 


STA. C 3.2 


STA. E 3.0 


STA. D 3.2 


STA. E 3.0 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 3.2 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 3.2 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 3.0 


STA. E 2 8 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 2.0 


STA. F 2.0 


12:00 PM 


12:15 PM 


12:30 PM 


12:45 PM 


1 :00 PM 


1:15 PM 


1:30 PM 


1 :45 PM 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 6.8 


WBBF 6.4 


WBBF 6.8 


WBBF 6.6 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 6.6 


WBBF 68 


STA. C 5.6 


STA. B 54 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. B 4.4 


STA. B 4.8 


STA. B 5.0 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. B 4.8 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. C 4.8 


STA. C 4.0 


STA. C 3.6 


STA. C 3.0 


STA. C 2.8 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. C 3.0 


STA. E 3.0 


STA. E 3.2 


STA. D 3.2 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. C 2.8 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. F 2.2 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 2.0 


STA. F 1.6 


2:00 PM 


2:15 PM 


2:30 PM 


2:45 PM 


3:00 PM 
WBBF 7.4 


3:15 PM 


3:30 PM 
WBBF SA 


3:45 PM 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 7.2 


WBBF 6.8 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 7.6 


WBBF 86 


STA. B 4.4 


STA. B 4.2 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. B 4.2 


STA. C 3.8 


STA. C 3.6 


STA. C 4.0 


STA. C 4.2 


STA. C 3.0 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. C 3.0 


STA. B 3.6 


STA. B 3.2 


STA. B 3.4 


STA. B 3.4 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 3.4 


STA. D 3.2 


STA. D 3.4 


STA. D 3 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 3.0 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 3 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


4:00 PM 


4:15 PM 


4:30 PM 


4:45 PM 


5:00 PM 


5:15 PM 


5:30 PM 


5:45 PM 


WBBF 9.0 


WBBF 9.2 


WBBF 9.0 


WBBF 8.8 


WBBF 8.2 


WBBF 8.0 


WBBF 8.0 


WBBF 76 


STA. B 3.6 


STA. C 3.4 


STA. C 4.0 


STA. C 3.8 


STA. C 4.2 


STA. C 4.2 


STA. B 4.0 


STA. C 4.4 


STA. C 3.6 


STA. B 3.2 


STA. B 3.6 


STA. D 3.6 


STA. B 3.6 


STA. B 3.8 


STA. C 3.6 


STA. B 3 6 


STA. D 3.4 


STA. D 3.2 


STA. D 3.6 


STA. B 3.4 


STA. D 3.0 


STA. D 2.8 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.8 


STA. E 2.6 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. E 2.2 


STA. E 2.4 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.6 


6:00 PM 


6:15 PM 


6:30 PM 


6:45 PM 


7:00 PM 


7:15 PM 


7:30 PM 


7:45 PM 


WBBF 7.2 


WBBF 7.2 


WBBF 7.6 


WBBF 7.8 


WBBF 7.2 


WBBF 6.8 


WBBF 7.0 


WBBF 66 


STA. C 6.6 


STA. C 6.0 


STA. B 4.8 


STA. B 4.8 


STA. B 4.2 


STA. B 4.0 


STA. B 4.0 


STA. B 4.4 


STA. B 5.0 


STA. B 4.6 


STA. C 4.2 


STA. C 4.6 


STA. F 2.8 


STA. F 2.6 


STA. C 3.0 


STA. C 2 8 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 2.6 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. C 2.2 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 2 


STA. E 2.0 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.0 


STA. D 2.0 


STA. D 2.2 


STA. F 1.8 


STA. F 1.6 


STA F 1.4 
















8:00 PM 


8:15 PM 


8:30 PM 


8:45 PM 


9:00 PM 


9:15 PM 


9:30 PM 


9:45 PM 


WBBF 6.2 


WBBF 5.6 


WBBF 5.8 


WBBF S.2 


WBBF 5.4 


WBBF 5 4 


WBBF 5.6 


WBBF 5.0 


STA. B 3.8 


STA. B 3.2 


STA. B 2.8 


STA. B 2.8 


STA. B 3.0 


STA. B 2.6 


STA. B 3.2 


STA. B 30 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. C 2.2 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. C 2.4 


STA. C 2 6 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. C 2 8 


STA. D 2.4 


STA. D 2.2 


STA. C 2.0 


STA. C 2.2 


STA. 2.2 


STA. D 2.0 


STA. D 1.8 


STA. D 2.0 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA F 1.8 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.6 


STA. F 1.6 


STA F 1.6 


10:00 PM 


10:15 PM 


10:30 PM 
WBBF 4.4 


10:45 PM 


1 1 :00 PM 
WBBF 36 


11 :15 PM 


11:30 PM 


11 45 PM 


WBBF 4.8 


WBBF 4.6 


WBBF 4.4 


WBBF 3.2 


WBBF 2.6 


WBBF 


STA. B 3.2 


STA. B 2.8 


STA. B 3.0 


STA. B 2.8 


STA. B 3.4 


STA. B 2.8 


STA. C 2.0 


STA. C 1.8 


STA. C 2.6 


STA. C 2.4 


STA. C 2.8 


STA. C 2.4 


STA. C 3.4 


STA C 2.6 


STA. B 1.8 


STA. B 16 


STA. D 2.2 


STA. D 2.0 


STA. D 1.8 


STA. D 1.8 


STA. D 1.6 


STA D 1.4 


STA. D 1.2 


STA. 10 


STA. F 1.4 


STA. F 1.2 


STA. F .8 


STA. F .6 


STA. F .8 


STA. F .8 


STA. F .6 


STA F .4 



::i 




anrone For snmcs ? 



Let's face it — we're in a business where statistics flow like 
. . . er, water. 

Since this is the case, here are a few for your consideration: 

In the morning, WBT's audience lead over its nearest com- 
petitor is 92%.* 

In the afternoon, WBT's audience lead over its nearest com- 
petitor is 69%.* 

At night, WBT's audience lead over its nearest competitor 
is 123%.* 

Three mighty good reasons for placing your next schedule 
on WBT — the station that creates the nation's 24th largest 
radio market. Call CBS Radio Spot Sales for availabilities. 

*Pulse 25 county area March 1959 



wbt CHariprre 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS RADIO SPOT SALES 
JEFFERSON STANDARD BROADCASTING COMPANY 



AM STATIONS 

(continued from page 80) 

WSKY everett-mckinney 

WWNC ..h-r 

Charlotte 

WAYS broadcast time sis. 

WBT _ cbs spot 

WGIV _._ forjoe 

WIST _ p. g. w. 

WKTC _ masla 

WSOC _ _ _ h-r 

WWOK _.. __ o'connell 

Clinton 

WRRZ __ walker-rawalt 



Durham 

WDNC 
WSRC 
WSSB 
WTIK 

Edenton 

WCDJ 



raymer 

_ bob dore 

gill-perna 

pearson; grant webb 



best 



Elizabeth City 

WCNC bogner & martin 

Elizabethtown 

WBLA best 

Fayetteville 

WFAI _ dark 

WFLB ._. burn-smith 

WFNC _ _ grant webb 

Fuquay Springs 
WFVG continental radio sis. 



continental radio sis. 
__ dark 



Gastonia 

WGNC 

WLTC _ 

Greensboro 

WBIG _ hollingbery 

WCOG broadcast time sis. 

WGBG burn-smith 

Greenville 

WGTC devney 

Henderson 

WHVH best; grant webb 

Hendersonville 

WHKP best 



pearson 



Hickory 

WIRC __.. _ 

Raleigh 

WKIX hollingbery; grant webb 

WMSN forjoe 

WPTF _ p. g. w. 

WRAL .... h-r 

WSHE meeker 

Wilmington 

WGNI grant webb 

WKLM broadcast time sis. 

WMFD burn-smith 



Wilson 

WGTM 

WVOT 



r. v. h. | 
devney I 



Winston-Salem 

WAAA _ . bob dore 

WAIR burn-smith 

WSJS headley-reed 

WTOB v. r. & m. 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck 

KBOM gill-perna 

KFYR _ blair 

KQDI -— united 

Fargo (N.D.) — Moorehead (Minn.) 

KVOX devney 

KXGO _ gill-perna 

WDAY — _ p. g. w. : 

Grand Forks 

KILO everett-mckinney 

KNOX .._.. r. v. h 1 



82 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



vAinot 



KCJB 

KLPM 


weed 
walker-rawalt 




united 


JHIO 




Vkron 




\\A1)( 


hollingbery 


WAKR 


mcgavren 


WtTK 


gill-perna 


WIIKK 


torjoe 


'.onton 




\V \\D 


breen Cr ward 


W ( ' \1 W 


_ masla 


WHBC 


v. r. Cr m. 


Cincinnati 




WC1X 


pearson 


WCKY 


am radio sis. 


WCPO 


biair 


WKRC 


katz 


WNOP 


devney 


WSAI 


young 


WZIP 


mcgavren 


Cleveland 




KYW 


am radio sis. 


WDOK . 

WERE 


broadcast time sis. 

v. r. Cr m. 


WGAR 


christal 


W1IK 


blair 


W.I Mi i 


united 




katz 


Columbus 




WBXS 


blair 


WCOL 


eastman 


WMNI 


broadcast time sis. 


\V K f n 


gill-perna 


WTVN 


...... katz 


WVKO 


v. r. Cr m. 


)ayton 




WAVI 

WHIO 


..... broadcast time sis. 

... hollingbery 


WIXG 


eastman 


WONE _. 


headley-reed 


vAanstidd 




WCLW 


devney 


WMAN 


v. r. & m. 


'ortsmouth 




WXXT 

WPAY 


everett-mckinney 

breen & ward 


>pringficld 




WBLY 

WIZE 


dark 

o'connell 


iteubenville 




WSTV 


avery-knodel 


Toledo 




WOHO 


pearson 


WSPD 


katz 


WTOD 


weed 


WTOL 


gill-perna 


foungstown 




WBBW 

WKMJ 


weed 

headley-reed 


WHOT 

WKBX 


hollingbery 

— raymer 


■lanesville 




WHIZ 


pearson 


OKLAHOMA 




Enid 




■ KCRC _. 

K(I\YA 


pearson 
v. r. Cr m. 


Oklahoma City 




Ki.ri; 


weed 


KOCY . ._ 


pearson 


KOMA 


blair 


KTOK 


eastman 


KTOW 


raymer 


KYFM 

WKY .. . 


best 
katz 


Shawnee 




KC.FF 


avery-knodel 


Tulsa 




K \KC _ 

KIWI.1 


young 
masla 


KRMG 

KTUL 
KVOO 


blair 

avery-knodel 

petry 



OREGON 

Bend 

KBXI) 



meeker 



Coos Bay — North Bend 

KFIR _ 

COOS - - 

KVN'i; 

Corvallis 

KFLY _ 

KLOO 



Eugene 

KASH 

KEEIJ _ 

KERG 

KORE 

KTJGN ...- 

Klamath Falls 

KFJ1 

KFI.W 

KI.AD — 



_W. s. grant 

grant webb 

pearson 



everett-mckinney 
mcgillvra 



cooke 

._ pearson 

weed 

everett-mckinney 
_ meeker 



meeker 

weed 

w. s. grant 



Medford 

KBOY 

k m k i > 

KWIX 

KY.IC 



Portland 

KEX 
KGON . 

IOiW 

KISN ... 

KKKY 

KLIQ 

KOIX 

KPAM 

KIM.. I 
KW.TJ 
KXL _.. 



w. s. grant 

meeker 

pearson 
grant webb 



am radio sis. 

broadcast time sis. 

blair 

_ young 

bernard 

_ raymer 

cbs spot 

_ meeker 

petry 

. forjoe 

eastman 



Roseburg 

KRXR . 
KRXL ... 
EYES 



meeker 

oakes 

pearson 



Salem 

KBZT 
KG AY 

KSLM 



meeker 
holman; pearson 
everett-mckinney 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentown 



WAEB 
WHOL ... 
WKAP - 

WSAX 



Altoona 

WFBG 
WRTA 

WYAM 

Erie 

WERC 
WICU 
WJET 
WLEU 

Farrell 

WFAR 



radio-tv 

raymer 

weed 

h-r 



mcgavren 
dark 
weed 



weed; v. r. & m. 

mcgavren 

forjoe 

radio-tv 



united 



Harrisburg 

WOMB _ 
WHGB 

WHP 

WKBO .. 

Hazleton 

WA/.l. 



Homestead 
WAMO 

Johnstown 

WARD 
WCRO 

W.I AC 



gill-perna 

mcgavren 

boiling 

meeker 



raymer 



forjoe 



weed 

forjoe 

o'connell 



Lancaster 

WGAL 

Wl. AN 

New Castle 

WKST 



meeker 
headley-reed 



everett-mckinney 



tops 



I 



quantity 



WIS delivers 33% more 
than its nearest competitor 
... as much as 4 Columbia 
stations combined. 

12 county Pulse, March 1959 



tops** 

in 
quality 



Read the facts on our quality 
audience in a recent qualitative 
survey made by the University 
of S. C. Marketing Division. 

All this— PLUS established 
personalities, award winning 
news staff, and merchandising. 
"Check with your PCW Colonel 
for the full story on your 



best buy 



COLUMBIA, S.C. 

NBC - 560 KC ■ 5000 WATTS 



C. Richard Shafto, Exec. Vice President 
W. Frank Harden, Managing Director 



.ii n 1959 



83 



& 










My Mommy Listens 
to KFWB 



...and listens, and listens 
and listens! Pulse and 
Hooper have proven it for 
many months past... and 
now Nielsen makes it 
unanimous: rates KFWB 
#1 in total audience in the 
L.A. Area in their book, 
too! So . . . whether you 
use Pulse, Hooper or Niel- 
sen as a guide . . . one 
thing you should do for 
sure: Buy KFWB . . . first 
in Los Angeles. It's the 
thing to do! 




6419 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28 / HO 3-5151 

ROBERT M. PURCELL, President and Gen Manager 
i*MES F. SIMONS, Gen. Sales Manager 
Represented nationally by JOHN BLAIR 1 CO. 



AM STATIONS 

Philadelphia 

WCAU ___ cbs spot 

WDAS howard 

WFIL blair 

WFLN good music brdcstrs. 

W HAT pearson 

WIBG katz 

WIP _ _. perry 

WJMJ broadcast time sis. 

WPEN gill-perna 

WBCV nbc spot 

Pittsburgh 

KDKA am radio sis. 

KQV _ _ young 

WAMO for joe 

W AMP nbc spot 

WCAE katz 

WEEP eastman 

WE DO _ weed 

WLOA good music brdcstrs. 

WW SW blair 

Reading 

WEEU headley-reed 

WHUM -- weed 

WRAW ... meeker 

Sc ronton 

WARM _ eastman 

WEJL _ meeker 

WGBI _ h-r 

WICK walker-rawalt 

WSCR headley-reed 

Wilkes-Barre 

WBAX burn-smith 

WBRE headley-reed 

WILK - _ avery-knodel 

Williamsport 

WLYC _ - cooke 

WMPT hopewell 

WRAK ._ meeker 

WWPA burn-smith 

York 

WNOW radio-tv 

WORK meeker 

WSBA _ eastman 



RHODE ISLAND 

Providence — Paw tucket 

WEAN v. r. & m. 

WHIM headley-reed 

WICE avery-knodel 

WJAR petry 

WPAW _ - walker-rawalt 

WPRO _ blair 

WRIB _ indie sis. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Bamberg 

WWBO _ bob dore 

Charleston 

WOKE dark 

wcsc :... - p. g. w. 

WPAL bob dore 

WQSN radio-tv 

WTMA branham 

Columbia 

WCOS meeker 

WIS — P- g. w. 

WMSC . h-r 

WNOK raymer 

WOIC bob dore 

Florence 

WJMX walker-rawalt 

WOLS bob dore 

WYNN bob dore 

Fountain Inn 

WFIS best 

Greenville 

WESC ... headley-reed 

WFBC avery-knodel 

WMRB burn-smith 

WQOK _ . ... howard 

Orangeburg 

WDIX devney; forjoe 

WTND dark 

Spartanburg 

WORD avery-knodel 



(continued from page 83) 



WSPA hollingbery 

WTHE masla 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



Aberdeen 
KABR 
KSDN 



bob dore 
weed 



Rapid City 

KOTA headley-reed 

KRSD _.. meeker 



Sioux Falls 

KELO . 
KIHO 



h-r 

gill-perna 

KISD cooke 

KSOO . avery-knodel 



Yankton 

KYNT _ _ _. bob dore 

WNAX katz 



TENNESSEE 

Bristol 



WCYB 

WFHG 
WOPI 



Chattanooga 

WAGC 

WAPO 

WDEF 

WDOD 

WDXB 

WMFS 



weed 

walker 
burn-smith 



burn-smith 
gill-perna 
.branham 

raymer 

h-r 

pearson 



Clarksville 

WDXN ._ 
WJZM 



. & m. 
masla 



Columbia 

WKRM walker-rawalt 

WMCP best 



Jackson 

WDXI 
WTJS 



v. r. & m. 
branham 



Johnson City 

WETB .. devney 

_ .pearson 



raymer 



W.IHL 
WJSO . 

Knoxville 

WATE ...avery-knodel 

WBIR __ gill-perna 

WIVK howard 

WKGN o'connell 

WKXV bernard 

WNOX ... ... blatr| 

Memphis 

KWAM .. bernard' 

WDIA boiling 

WHBQ _ eastma 

WHER _ bob dor 

WHHM grant web 

WLOK howar 

WMC blaii 

WMPS radio-t> 

WREC _ . kati 



Nashville 

WE NO . 
WKDA . 
WLAC .. 
WMAK . 
WNAH . 
WSIX 



bernarc 

howarc 

kat: 



broadcast time sis 

bes 

h 

WSM -- blai 

WYOL pearsoi 



Oak Ridge 

WATO .... 



bes 



TEXAS 

Abilene 

KNIT pearso 

KRBC — - raymc 

KWKC v. r. & rr 

Amarillo 

KAMQ wee 

KFDA _. . raym 

KGNC ka 



84 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



KIXZ 
KUAV 
KZIP 

Austin 

KNOW 
KOKE 

KTBC ... 
KVET _ 

Beaumont 

KI'li.M 
K.TKT 
KKIC 
KTRM . 



Big Spring 

KB ST 
KBYG „ 
KHEM 



boiling 
s. grant 
bcrnard 



pcarson 

boiling 

raymer 

forjoe 



p. g. w. 

forjoe 

branham 



o'connell 



pearson 
best 

dark 



Corpus Christi 

KATE weed 

KCCT national time sis.; oakes 

KEYS avery-knodel 

KKYS p. g. w. 

KSIX _ forjoe 

Kl'XD _ o'connell 

Dallas 

K BOX __ eastman 

KIXL broadcast time sis. 

KLIP blair 

KRLD branham 



WF \A 
WRR 

El Paso 

KELP 

KIII'.Y 

KOYE 

KROD 

KSET 

WTSM 

XEJ 

XELO 



Fort Worth 

KC1 L 

K K.I Z 

KIXT 

KJIM 

KNOK 

KXOL 

WBAP 



petry 
avery-knodel 



KXYZ 

K1 OK 



young 

boiling 

grant webb 

branham 

mcgavren 

hollingbcry 



national time sis.; oakes 
o'connell 



bernard 
blair 
pearson 
raymer 
howard 
eastman 
p. g- w. 



Galveston 

KGBC .... 
KIL E 

Houston 



pearson 
o'connell 



Longview 

KPRO 

KI.TI 

Lubbock 

KCBD 
KDAV 
KDUB 

Kl'\ 
Kl.l.l. 
KSEL 

Lufkin 

KRBA 
KTRE 

Odessa 

KECK 

KiiSA 
KOYL 
KRIQ 



h-r 
howard 



cookc 
pearson 



raymer 

bernard 

branham 

katz 

indie sis. 

weed 



continental radio sis. 
v. r. 6- m. 



united 

boiling 

r. v. h. 

dark 



KCIHI pearson 

KILT ... blair 

KLVL national time sis. ; oakes 

KNUZ - katz 

KPRC - — petry 

KRCT - bernard 

KREL best 

KTHT - young 

KTRH p. g- w. 



San Angelo 

KGKL pearson 

KPEP broadcast time sis. 

KTXL indie sis. 

KWFK dark 

San Antonio 



KCOR 

KENS 



o'connell 
p. g. w. 



* 



no other 50,000 watt radio station 
in DALLAS (or all North Texas) 

delivers so much! 




Population: 


5,057,400 


Families: 


1,464,100 


Effective Buying Income: 


$7,758,126,000 


Retail Sales: 


$5,707,316,000 


Food Sales: 


$1,362,898,000 


General Mdse.: 


$ 721,615,000 


Apparel: 


$ 281,079,000 


Furn. H-H, App.: 


$ 237,144,000 


Automotive: 


$1,253,716,000 


Gasoline S S: 


$ 515,966,000 



Drugs 



$ 198,070,000 




*820KC — NBC 

Dallas 

50,000 watts 

570KC — ABC 

5,000 watts 

Edward Petry & Co. 
National Rep. 

RADIO • DALLAS 

Broadcast Services of The Dallas Morning News 



July 1959 



85 



In Houston 

HOOPER 




K-NIIZ 

Houston's' 24-Hour 
- -Music ahdJIews. 



National Reps.: 

THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

• New York *St. Louis 

• Chicago * San Francisco 

• Detroit * Los Angeles 

• Atlanta * Dallas 

IN HOUSTON, 

CALL DAVE MORRIS 

JAckson 3-2581 



AM STATIONS 

{continued from page 85) 



KEXX _ mcgillvra 

KITE _ boiling 

KMAC broadcast time sis. 

K ( ) X O _ katz 

KTSA blair 

KUBO ._ national time sis. 

WOAI __ petry 



She 



rman 

KRRV 

KTXll 



pcarson 

bogner & martin 






Texorkona 

KCMC v. r. & m. 

KOSY pearson 

KTFS _..._ walker 

Tyler 

KDOK __. devney 



reilly 
v. r. & m. 



raymer 
...weed 



KGKB 
KTBB .. 

Waco 

KWTX 

WACO 

Weslaco — Rio Bravo, Mex. 

KRGV _ raymer 

XEFD _ all-star radio-tv 

Wichita Falls 

KSYD 

KTRX 
KWFT . 



eastman 

boiling 

h-r 



UTAH 

Ogden 

KKOG radio-tv 

KLO avery-knodel 

KVOG _ grant webb 

Provo 

KIXX .._ ...grant webb 

KoVO avery-knodel 

Salt Lake City 

KALL 

KDYL 

KLUB 

KNAK 

KSL 

KSOP 

KWHO .... 

Vernal 

KVEL 



avery-knodel 

katz 

hollingbery 

....for joe 

— cbs spot 

bernard 

w. s. grant 



united 



VERMONT 

Burlington 

WCAX weed 

WDOT walker-rawalt 

WJOY everett-mckinney 

Rutland 

WHWB _ gill-perna 

WSYB devney 

VIRGINIA 

Bristol 



WCYB 

WFHG 
WOPI . 



weed 

walker-rawalt 
burn-smith 



Charlottesville 

WCHY dark 

WELK gill-perna 

WINA walker-rawalt 

Danville 

WBTM gill-perna 

WDVA _ keller 

WILA walker-rawalt 

Lynchburg 

WBRG dark 

WIiVA ..... hollingbery 

WffOl) burn-smith 

Norfolk — Portsmouth — Hampton — 
Newport News 

WAVY h-r 

AYCMS bernard; grant webb 

WGH _ ...blair 

WLOW head ley-reed 

WNOR - weed 

WRAP continental brdcstg. 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



jrVTAR 
WVEC 

wvor 

tichmond 

WANT 

WKZI. 
WLEE 
w LL"5 

WMIKi 
WHNL 

win- A 



petry 

avery-knodcl 

united 



united 

avery-knodel 

select; megavren 

masla 

boiling 

petry 

WXG1 grant webb 

toanoke 

WDB.I P- g- W- 

\V 1 1 Y E o'connell 

WRIS burn-smith 

WSLS blair 



WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen 

K BKW - devney 

KXRO walker-rawalt 

Bcllinghom 

KENY _ w. s. grant 

KPTJG pearson 

KVOS - — . forjoe 

Longview 

KBAM 

KKIKI - 

Moses Lake 

KSEM -.. 

KWIQ .__ 



holman; w. s. grant 
pearson 



pearson 

hollingbery 



walker-rawalt 
w. s. grant 



Olympic 

KGY ._._ 

KITN 

Seattle 

KAYO __ young 

KING blair 

KIRO p. g. w. 

KJR eastman 

KOL __ boiling 



katz 

grant webb 

o'connell 

h-r 

meeker 



hollingbery 

katz 

boiling 

eastman 

petry 

avery-knodel 

r. v. h. 



KOMO 

KTIX 
KTV\Y 

KYI 

K X A 

Spokane 

EGA 

KHQ 

KI.YK 

KNEW 

KRK.M 
KXI.Y 
KZI'X 

Tacoma 

K I'll A 

KMO - 

KTAC 

KTN'T weed 

Walla Walla 

KHIT w. s. grant 

KTKL r. v. h. 

KIM united 

Wenatchee 

KMEL _ pearson 

KPQ ._ forjoe 

KUEN w. s. grant 

Yakima 

K I M A hollingbery 

KIT megavren 

KLOQ ... pearson 

KUTI united 



continental radio sis. 
avery-knodel 
pearson 



WEST VIRGINIA 



Beckley 

WJLS _ 
WWNR 



burn-smith 
weed 



Bluefield 

WHIS katz 

WKOY _. devney 

Charleston 

WCAW bob dore 

WCHS _._ branham 



WHMS 

W K A /. 
WTIP 



Clarksburg 

WI'.OY 

wiiai; 
WPDX 



stars national 

Katz 

r. v. h. 



Fairmont 

W.MMX 
WTCS 



branham 

burn-smith 

pearson 



hollingbery 
gill-perna 



Huntington 

WHTN 

XYI'I-H 
WSAZ 
WTCE 



gill-perna 

branham 

katz 

boiling 



Parkersburg 

WCEF 
WCOM 

wi'Ai; 



Wheeling 

WHLL 
W K W K 
WOMP 
WWVA 



r. v. h.; broadcast time sis. 

devney 

branham 



gill-perna 

bob dore 

burn-smith 

blair 



WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

WAPL walker-rawalt 

UIIIiY burn-smith 

Beloit 

WBEL gill-perna 

WGEZ everett-mckinney 

Eau Claire — Chippewa Falls 

\YAXX ._ masla 

\YRIZ _ pearson 

WEAU — _ hollingbery 

YVECL .. avery-knodel 



H RADI 



according to all surveys 
PULSE - HOOPER - TRENDEX 



S$$$$»»$$$$$s3l 



HAMPTON 



NEWPORT NEWS 



'* A D ',.?„. 

Norfolk, Newport News, Portsmouth 
and Hampton, Virginia 




. X 



represented nationally by The JOHN BLA 



ompa 



IULY 1959 



87 



\Mmm 




dz£c? 



CAPTIVE MARKET 



KPQ'S 12 COUNTY 
INLAND WASHINGTON MARKET 
IS A CAPTIVE MARKET 
COMPLETELY SURROUNDED BY MOUNTAINS 
AND ISOLATED 
FROM BOTH SEATTLE 
AND SPOKANE! 

KPQ gets RESULTS 2 TO 1 ! 

and CHALLENGES all other 

INLAND WASHINGTON MEDIA 

TO DISPROVE THEM! 



HOW DO YOU LIKE THOSE APPLES? 

WE'LL BACK OUR CLAIMS WITH MONEY WHERE 

OUR MOUTHS ARE! 

POPULATION: 448,300— 
EFFECTIVE BUYING INCOME $780,120,000.00 



-May 10, 1959 Sales Management "Survey of Buying Power" 



KPQ 

WENATCHEE, WASHINGTON 



>. G E * RE * U« G 



5000 W 
560 KC 



' C °*N. AND NE* S** 



Lf Seattle & Portland Reps. National Reps. 

Art Moore & Associates Weed & Co. 






AM STATIONS 

(continued from page 87) 

Green Bay 

WBAY katj 

WDl'Z mcgavren 

WJPG 



¥ 
gill-perna ' 



La Crosse 

WKBH h-r 

WKTY everett-mckinney 

Ladysmith 

WLDY continental radio sis. 

Madison 

WIBA avery-knodel 

Wise p. g. w. 

WKOW .. headlev-reed 

WMFM continental radio sis. 



radio-tv 
holman 



hollingbcry 



Manitowoc 

WCUB 

WOMT 

Marinette 

WMAM 

Milwaukee 

WEMP headley-reed 

WFOX pearson 

WISN petry 

WJI I L gill-perna 

WOKY young 

WRIT eastman 

WTJIJ ..._ _.. christal 

Racine 

WRAC - _ devney 

WRJN _ walker-rawalt 



: 



Superior 

WDSM 
WQMN 



p. g. w. 
dark 



WYOMING 

Casper 

KATI 



continental radio sis. 



KSPR walker-rawalt 

KVOC devney 



Cheyenne 

KFBC ... 
KVWO 



FM Stations 



avery-knodel 
pearson 



ARIZONA 

Phoenix 

KTYL 

CALIFORNIA 



young 



Atherton 




KPEN 


fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

fm unltd. Imidw.) 


Fresno 




KRFM 


blair 


Long Beach 




KNOB _ 


grant 


Los Angeles 




KBCA 

KDUO 

KFMU 

KGLA 


fine music hi-fi brdcstrs.; 

fm unltd. (midw.) 

. fm unltd. (midw.l 

good music brdcstrs. 

best 


KMLA 


fm unltd. (midw..) 


KRHM 


pearson 


San Diego 





KFSD-FM 



katz 



San Francisco 

KDFO walker-rewalt 

KSFR-FM good music brdcstrs.; grant; 

fm unltd. imidw. I 



COLORADO 

Denver 

KDEN-FM breen & ward 

KTGM --- fi"e music hi-fi brdcstrs. 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



:ONNECTICUT 

tartford 



W 1 1 ( \ 
WTIC-FM 



fm unltd. I, midw.) 
henry i. christal 



■Aeriden 

WM.MW I'M thos. f. dark 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Vashington 

WASH 
WFAN 

WW DC KM 



-LOR I DA 

loral Gables 
WVCG-FM 

Gainesville 
WRUF-FM _ 



good music brdestrs. 

united brdestg. 

blair 



thos. f. dark; 

good music brdestrs. 



burn-smith 



v^iami 
. WWPB 

3E0RCIA 

Xtlanta 
WGKA-FM .. .. 

Augusta 

WACG-FM 

\\ BBQ-FM 

ILLINOIS 

Anna 
WRAJ-FM 

Bloomington 
WJBC-FM - 

Chicago 

WKAW-F.M good 
' WFMF _ 

1 WK.My 

' WNIB _. 

Decatur 

WSOY-FM 

Evanston 

WKAW-F.M 

Mattoon 

Wl.BHFM 

INDIANA 

Connersville 

WCNB-FM 

Indianapolis 

WFMs 

Madison 
WORX-FM 

Muncie 

WMI'X 



fine music hi-fi brdestrs. 



good music brdestrs. 



r. v. h. 
everett-mckinney; forjoe 



stars national 



pearson 



music brdestrs.; grant webb 
fine music hi-fi brdestrs. 

— f m unltd. (midw.) 

fm unltd. (midw.) 



weed 



good music brdestrs.; 

walker-rawalt; grant webb 



hal holman 



gill-perna 



fm unltd. (midw.) ; 
good music brdestrs. 



Washington 

WF.MI. 

IOWA 

Muscatine 

KW I '(KM 

KENTUCKY 

Fulton 

WKU. KM 



walker-rawalt; hal holman 



best 



pearson 



geo. t. hopewell 



Henderson 

W SOX I'M 

Madisonville 

WKMWK.M 

Mayfield 
WNGO FM 

MAINE 

Caribou 
WFST 



bogner Cr martin 



best 



indie sis. 



rich, o'connell 



MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

WF1>S fine music hi-fi brdestrs. 

WITH KM good music brdestrs.; 

select; megavren 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

WBCN fm unltd. (midw.) 

WBZ-FM __. am radio sis. 

WNAC-FM h-r 

WXHi; walker-rawalt 



Brockton 

WBET-FM 



walker-rawalt 



MICHIGAN 

Benton Harbor 

WHFB-FM everett-mckinney 

Detroit 

WLI>M good music brdestrs. 

W.MZK fine music hi-fi brdestrs. 



Grand Rapids 

WLAV-FU ... 

Jackson 

WMKZ 



megavren 



fine music hi-fi brdestrs. 



MINNESOTA 

Mankato 



KYSM-FM 




Minneopolis-St 


Paul 


KWKM 




WLOL-FM 






fine music hi-fi brdestrs. 


MISSOURI 




Kansas City 




KCMO-FM 


katz 


St. Louis 




KCF.M 


good music brdestrs. 


Springfield 




KTTS-FM 


. ... wood 


West Plains 




KWl'.M K.M 


... best 



bes * NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Berlin 

WKCQ 
Nashua 

WOTW-FM 



oreen & ward; walker-rawalt 



walker-rawalt 



NEW MEXICO 

Albuquerque 

KIIKM 

NEW YORK 

Babylon 

WBA1S KM 



best 



r. v. h. 




Sacramento 






Looking for "Spending Power"? 

You'll find ii on KCRA! The firs! 
Audience Composition Radio Pulse 
ever taken in the Sacramento area 
shows a very high adult audience to 
K.CRA in all time periods . . . num- 
ber one in the <> A.M. to 12 Mid- 
night average. A-^k. your Petry Man 
lor a look at this Audience Com- 
position Survey. 

More Unduplicated Homes, Too! 

The last Pulse Cumulative Audi- 
ence Report also shows KCRA 
with the most unduplicated homes 
readied in the Sacramento area, 
both daily and weekly. Low CPM, 
too. Wise l>u\ loi your (Hems' 
dollars! 



Ask 
your 
Petry 
Man 




— Sacramento — i 



July 1959 



89 



BEST 



SPOT 



BUY 



IN SAN ANTONIO! 

The unchallenged 
market leader 
... by PULSE 
... by HOOPER 
... and used by the 
following advertisers: 

Air Transport Assn., Alemite, Alka Seltzer, 
American Machine & Foundry, B-C, Bayer 
Aspirin, Bayer Nasal Spray, Ben Gay, Bexel 
Vitamins, Blondex, Blue Bonnet Margarine, 
Borden's, Bowman Biscuit, Bristol Meyers, 
Budweiser, Busch-Bavarian, Camel, Campho- 
Phenique, Cannon Mills, Cardui, Champion 
Spark Plugs, Chef Boy-Ar-Dee, Chevrolet, 
Chrysler, Coca Cola, Coldene, Conoco, 
Coppertone, Cudahy, Eastern Airlines, Edsel, 
Energine, Eveready Batteries, Falstaff, 
Florists Tel. Del. Assn., Ford, Greyhound Bus, 
Gulf Oil, Hamilton Watches, Hit Parade, 
Hormel, Italian Swiss Colony, Kent, L & M, 
Lance Products, Lever Bros., Lucky Strike, 
Magnolia Petroleum, Mercury, Mexsana, 
Mistol, Mum, Murine, My-T-Fine, National 
Biscuit, Newport, Oasis, Old Gold, 
Oldsmobile, One-A-Day, Pall Mall, Pacquins, 
Penetro, Pepsi Cola, Peter Paul Candy, 
Plough Inc., Portland Cement, Praise, 
Prestone, RCA Victor, R-C Cola, Ralston 
Purina, Rayco, Readers' Digest, Revlon, Roma 
Wine, Schlitz, Seaforth, Sears Roebuck & 
Co., Silk-N-Satin, Sinclair, Silver Dust, 
Silversmiths Guild, Sioux Bee Honey, Soltice, 
Squirt, Sterling Drugs, St. Joseph's Aspirin, 
Texaco, Time Magazine, Top Value Stamps, 
Treesweet, Trig, United Fruit, Wildroot 
Cream Oil, Winston, Winter Pears, Wolf 
Brand Chili and others. 

How about YOUR 
next schedule? 

See your 

KATZ AGENCY 

REPRESENTATIVE 



KONO 



JACK ROTH, Manager 

P. O. Box 2338 
San Antonio 6, Texas 



90 



FM STATIONS {continued 

Buffalo 

WBNY-FM masla 



Cortland 

WKRT-FJI 



gill-perna 



Hempstead 

WHLI-FM gill perna 

Hornell 

WWHG-FM r . v. h. 

New York 

WBAI . f m unltd. (midw.) 

WBFM fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

WNCN fm unltd. (midw.) 

Olean 

WHDL-FM ...everett mckinney 

Patchogue 

WALK-FM grant webb 

WPAC-FM ..._ thos. f dark 

Syracuse 

WONO fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

Troy 

WFLY .....gi||-p e rna 

Utica 

WRUN-FM . avery-knodel 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Asheboro 

WGWR-FM henry i. christal 

Burlington 

WBBB-FM thos. f. dark 

Charlotte 

WMIT ._ grant webb 

Lexington 

WBTJY-FM henry i. christal 

Rocky Mount 

WFMA _ fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

Thomasville 

WTNC-FM continental radio sis. 

OHIO 

Alliance 

WFAH-FM grant webb 

Cincinnati 

WKRC-FM good music brdcstrs.; katz 

Cleveland 

KYW-FM ....am radio sis. 

WDOK-FM :. brdcst. time sis. 

Columbus 

WVKO-FM v. r. m. 

Fremont 

WFRO-FM ..best 

Newark 

WLCT-FM _.._ meeker 

Toledo 

WSPD-FM katz 

WTRT fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

Wooster 

WWST-FM - - fobt. s. keller 



OKLAHOMA 

Oklahoma City 
KYFM 



Stillwater 

KSPI-FM thos. f. dark 



OREGON 

Portland 

KEX-FM - a" 1 radio sis. 

KPFM _ meeker 



from page 89) 
PENNSYLVANIA 

Butler 

WBTJT-FM _ gill-perna 

Lancaster 

WLAN-FM headley-reed 

Philadelphia 

WFLN-FM good music brdcstrs. 

WHAT-FM bob dore 

WJBB-FM fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

WPEN-FM .... .....gill-perna 

Pittsburgh 

KDKA-FM am radio sis. 

Williamsport 

WLYC-FH donald cooke 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

WPFM _ walker-rawalt 

WXCN fm unltd. (midw.) 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Greenville 

WESC-FM headley-reed 

WFBC-FM avery-knodel 

TENNESSEE 

Nashville 

WFMB fm unltd. (midw.) 

TEXAS 

Beaumont 

KRIC-FM branham 

Cleburne 

KCLE-FM best 

Dallas 

KIXL-FM broadcast time sis. 

WRR-FM avery-knodel 

Fort Worth 

WBAP-FM _ p. g. w. 

Houston 

KHGM good music brdcstrs. 

San Antonio 
KONO-FM _ h-r 

VIRGINIA 

Newport News — Norfolk — Portsmouth 

WGH-FM blair 

Staunton 

WAFC-FM thos. f. dark 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 

KING-FM blair 

KISW fine music hi-fi brdcstrs. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Oak Hill 

WOAY-FM pearson 

Wheeling 

WKWK-FJI walker-rawalt 

WISCONSIN 

Madison 

WIBA-FM - avery-knodel 

WMFM - continental radio sis. 

Milwaukee 

WFMR - -' m unltd. (midw.) 

WQFM - fm unltd. (midw.) 

West Bend 

WBKV-FM thos. f. dark; fm unltd. (midw.) 

AIR MEDIA BASICS 




■-' 




Think at oyer 

with your 

PETRY man 




gets action in San Francisco 

Audiences respond to KOBY's musical formula beamed to San 
Francisco families. From New York to San Francisco, advertisers 
know that KOBY motivates the market! 

If your favorite tune is "Happy Days are Here Again." played by 
thousands of ringing cash registers . . . then it's time you called your 
Petry Man. I Ie'll show you the rating facts and give you the big 
reasons to buy KOBY in San Francisco! 



10,000 watte . San Francfeco is KOBY-land 

KOSI IN DENVER — WGVM IN GREENVILLE, MISS. 
Mid-America Broadcasting Co. 



JULY 1959 




DELIVERED 

More Prime Time 

More Impressions 

More Homes per Dollar 



The Million Dollar Stations 

featuring 

Million Dollar Music 

on CKLW Radio 

Million Dollar Movies 

on CKLW-TV 



CKLW • CKLW-TV 

ROBERT E. EASTMAN & CO., INC. 

Natl Radio Rep 



GUARDIAN BLDG. DETROIT 



YOUNG TELEVISION CORP. 

Natl TV Rep. 



J. E. CAMPEAU 

President 



92 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



ELEVISION 
BASICS 




Facts & Figures: Here 

are data on viewing habits, 

spending and programs, etc. 

Stations & Reps: Here 

is a list of tr stations and 
their sales representatives 

Tv Homes by Counties: 

Nielsen's 1959 estimates of 
tv homes in all U.S. counties 







First by a good margin, WFBM-TV dominates all 
other stations in Mid-Indiana both in total coverage 
and market penetration, because it is the only basic 
NBC outlet. Map shows county percentages measured by 
Nielsen Coverage Study No. 3. 

where else . . . 

— will you find satellite markets that are 33% richer 

and 50% bigger than the metropolitan trading zone 

itself? 
— does a central market exert such an economic pull on 

so many specific areas that are retail trading centers 

in their own right ? 
— do you find such a widespread marketing area covered 

from one central point . . . and by WFBM-TV! 
— can you buy just one station with no overlapping 

penetration by basic affiliates of the same network ? 

Only here — where WFBM-TV is first in Mid- 
Indiana — can you buy more honest market penetration, 
more consumer influence, for fewer dollars expended 
than anywhere else. Let us show you how to test re- 
gional marketing ideas here with amazing results. 

The Nation's loth Television Market 

...with the only basic NBC coverage 
of 760,000 TV set owning families. 



? o W°°°° Indianapolis itself— Major retail 
area for 18 richer-than-average counties. 1,000,000 pop- 
ulation — 350,600 families with 90% television ownership! 



o 



11 Satellites— Each a recognized 
marketing area and well within WFBM-TV's basic 
area of influence — totaling more than 440,000 additional 
TV homes. Includes Marion • Anderson • Muncie • 
Bloomington • Vincennes Terre Haute • Danville, 
Illinois • Lafayette • Peru • Logansport • Kokomo. 

Represented Nationally by the KATZ Agency 




OUR 10TH 
ANNIVERSARY 



94 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



6 

TELEVISION 

' TV BASICS 



INDEX 



VIEWING HABITS 



Tv's hourly audience, winter and summer, local and N.Y. time page 96 

Tv's audience composition by half-hours during the evening page 98 

Tv's audience composition by hours during the daytime page 100 

How viewing varies by months and time zones, etc page 102 

How day and night audiences compare by intensity of viewing page 104 



SPENDING AND COSTS 



Tv spending by years; web, spot, local spending; broadcast income., page 106 

Details on network and spot spending page 107 

Network and spot t v expenditures by industry category page 110 

The top tv spenders with their network and spot breakdowns page 112 

Tv billings of top 50 air agencies; top spot, web agencies page 114 



NETWORK PROGRAMING TRENDS 



How nighttime program categories compare in popularity, etc page 116 

Station lineup, show length and type of sponsorship trends page 118 

Ratings, audience comp. by show types in competitive markets, etc... page 120 
Some interesting facts about Westerns page 121 



COLOR TV 



Summary of facts on the status of color page 122 

Stations equipped with color, by market and network, starts on page 122 

List of network advertisers with color tv experience page 126 

DIMENSIONS 

Tv saturation, total U.S., by regions and county size, etc page 128 

Growth and number of stations, tv industry employment, etc page 130 

SET PRODUCTION 

Set production, including uhf ; public's investment in tv page 131 

U.S. tv stations and their national reps . . . page 132 
U.S. homes with tv by county page 137 

july 1959 95 





TELEVISION 



VIEWING HABITS 



The daily U. S. viewing profile by hours of the day 

Jill ■■illlllllllllllM 

A. Summer and winter viewing facts for spot users — by local time 



(Homes using tv, average per minute) 
DAYTIME, MONDAY-FRIDAY 

|uly-Aug. 1958 



Jan. -Feb. 1959 



(000) 



1000) 



6-7 a.m. 


0.5 


215 


0.8 


352 


7-8 


4.4 


1,892 


6.6 


2,904 


8-9 


8.9 


3,827 


13.1 


5,764 


9-10 


12.7 


5,461 


15.6 


6,864 


10-11 


14.8 


6,364 


19.4 


8,536 


11-12 noon 


17.4 


7,482 


23.4 


10,296 


12 n-1 p.m. 


20.4 


8,772 


25.8 


11,352 


1-2 


18.0 


7,740 


21.7 


9,548 


2-3 


16.9 


7,267 


20.7 


9,108 


3-4 


19.0 


8,170 


22.8 


10,032 


4-5 


21.6 


9,288 


32.5 


14,300 


5-6 


23.8 


10,234 


42.4 


18,656 


EVENING, SUNDAY-SATURDAY 


6-7 p.m. 


28.6 


12,298 


56.1 


24,684 


7-8 


35.8 


15,394 


65.4 


28,776 


8-9 


45.4 


19,522 


69.7 


30,668 


9-10 


50.0 


21,500 


65.3 


28,732 


10-11 


39.5 


16,985 


46.9 


20,636 


11-12 mid. 


21.9 


9,417 


24.5 


10,780 



I. Summer and winter viewing facts for network users — by New York time 

(Homes using tv, average per minute) 
DAYTIME, MONDAY-FRIDAY 

July-Aug. 1958 Jan. -Feb. 1959 



SOI/IICE: A. C. Nielsen. 

Ijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 





% 


(000) 


% 


(000) 


6-7 a.m. 


0.3 


129 


0.4 


176 


7-8 


2.3 


989 


3.9 


1,716 


8-9 


6.4 


2,752 


10.0 


4,400 


9-10 


10.1 


4,343 


12.3 


5,412 


10-11 


12.5 


5,375 


16.1 


7,084 


11-12 noon 


15.6 


6,708 


21.7 


9,548 


12 n-1 p.m. 


18.7 


8,041 


24.5 


10,780 


1-2 


18.5 


7,955 


22.0 


9,680 


2-3 


16.7 


7.181 


20.8 


9,152 


3-4 


17.1 


7.353 


21.7 


9,548 


4-5 


20.8 


8.944 


28.3 


12,452 


5-6 


22.8 


9,804 


35.3 


15,532 


EVENING, SUNDAY-SATURDAY 


6-7 p.m. 


24.0 


10,320 


44.2 


19,448 


7-8 


29.9 


12,857 


56.3 


24,772 


8-9 


38.5 


16,555 


64.8 


28,512 


9-10 


46.8 


20,124 


67.0 


29,480 


10-11 


46.0 


19.780 


58.7 


25.828 


11-12 mid. 


31.1 


13.373 


38.2 


16,808 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllll 






96 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



Interview: y^Ji O^UJitmOAO^i^ 

Strietmann Biscuit Company Advertising Manager tells why he selects 
WLW-TV and WLW Radio for Zesta Crackers 



"In the Strietmann area, the combined wide 
coverage of the WLW-TV Stations and WLW 
Radio is that powerful advertising plus." 



e coverage matches 
wide distribution— 
Zesta Crackers 




The dynamic WLW group 



'So this perfect coverage-distribu- 
tion combination assures 8 times 
the lasting freshness for adver- 
tisers' commercial messages!" 



Call your WLW Stations' Representative . . . you'll be glad you did! 



WLW-T 

Television 
Cincinnati 



WLW-C 

Television 
Columbus 



WLW-D 

Television 
Dayton 



WLW-A 

Television 
Atlanta 



WLW-I 

Television 
Indianapolis 



Crosley Broadcasting Corporation, a division of AvCO 




July 1959 



97 



r 3 1 

k TELEVISION 



Viewing habits 



Television's audience composition at night 



ii^ ' ■ i;i :i' - - M ' :| -ii' i! |: ■■'!! -' '■ ^ ■ ..ii ; Mi .:! : ir .M r :i : ii , ii :i :i!i .,r j,.- ■ Mr ■ ir ir ,,; ■ ;! ,^ . ,,. n ■, ■ : mj: in. :n; !i; : in: '!i ii, ■': 'i! 



Nighttime audience composition by half hours 



N. Y. Total viewers 

Time (000) 



7:30-8 62,205 



8-8:30 67,408 



8:30-9 68,513 



9-9:30 67,478 



9:30-10 65,772 



10-10:30 56,463 



10:30-11 50,052 



Population segment 



Audience composition by: 


Men 
( 18 and over) 


Women 
(18 and over) 


Teens 
(12-17) 


Children 
(4-11) 


% total viewers 


27 


33 


12 


28 


number viewers (000) 


16,795 


20,528 


7,465 


17,417 


% total population segment 


31.1 


35.3 


46.7 


58 


% total viewers 


28 


34 


12 


26 


number viewers (000) 


18,874 


22,919 


8,089 


17,526 


% total population segment 


35 


39.5 


50.6 


58.3 


% total viewers 


29 


35 


12 


24 


number viewers (000) 


19,869 


23,979 


8,222 


16,443 


% total population segment 


36.9 


41.4 


51.3 


54.7 


% total viewers 


32 


38 


12 


18 


number viewers (000) 


21,593 


26,642 


8,097 


12,146 


% total population segment 


40 


45.9 


50.6 


40.5 


% total viewers 


33 


40 


12 


15 


number viewers ( 000 ) 


21,705 


26,309 


7,892 


9,866 


% total population segment 


40.2 


45.3 


49.3 


32.9 


% total viewers 


36 


43 


10 


11 


number viewers (000) 


20,327 


24,279 


5,646 


6,211 


% total population segment 


37.6 


41.9 


35.3 


20.7 


% total viewers 


37 


44 


9 


10 


number viewers (000) 


18,519 


22,033 


4,505 


5,005 


% total population segment 


34.3 


37.9 


28.2 


16.7 



Audience composition figures above add another 
dimension to the usual data. In addition to showing 
the number of viewers rather than homes, the figures 
go beyond the practice of showing what percent of 
viewers in each time period are men, etc. Using 
the total number of men, etc., in the U.S. population 
as a base, the chart also shows what percent of each 
population segment (men. women, etc. I is reached 



during the time period — a useful marketing statistic. 
Number of viewers per time period and the usual 
audience composition breakdown comes from Niel- 
sen (November-December 1958, Monday through 
Friday). Percent of total population segment 
reached was calculated by sponsor on the basis of 
population data worked out by Richard Dunne of 
SSCB and based on population as of 1 July 1958 



iilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliillliiiiiiliH 

98 AIR MEDIA BASICS 




Better than half the viewing families — 52.6% — watch 
WRGB. The May, 1959 ARB total area survey shows 
Channel 6 delivers more homes than the other two stations 
combined in the Northeastern New York and Western New 
England market. Contact your NBC Spot Sales representa- 
tive for the complete story. 



ATION SHARE OF AU 
SUNDAY THROUGH SATU 



STATION B STATION C 



* Source: Total Area ARB, May, 19S9 



WRGB CHANNEL 6 



A GENERAL ELECTRIC STATION 



ALBANY-SCHENECTADY-TROY 




Viewing habits 



Television's audience composition during the day 

N«"II««IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII Illllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll I Illlllll IIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I I IIIIIIIIIHIII IIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIII I!! Ill | | in lillllllllllllllilllllll | minium! || 



Daytime audience composition by hours 



Population segment 



N. Y. 
Time 


Total viewers 
(000) 


Audience composition by: 


Men 
(18 and over) 


Women 
(18 and over) 


Teens 
(12-17) 


Children 

(4-11) 






9,222 


% total viewers 


9 


35 


6 


50 




9-10 a.m. 


number viewers (000) 


830 


3,228 


553 


4,611 






% total population segment 


1.5 


5.5 


3.4 


15.3 






10,956 


% total viewers 


12 


49 


5 


34 




10-11 


number viewers (000) 


1,315 


5,368 


548 


3.725 






% total population segment 


2.4 


9.3 


3.4 


12.3 






15,910 


% total viewers 


15 


54 


5 


26 




11-N 


number viewers ( 000 ) 


2,387 


8,591 


795 


4,137 






% total population segment 


4.4 


14.8 


5 


13.8 






18,234 


% total viewers 


16 


56 


4 


24 




N-l p.m. 


number viewers (000) 


2,918 


10,211 


729 


4,376 






% total population segment 


5.4 


17.6 


4.6 


14.7 






15,418 


% total viewers 


16 


56 


6 


22 




1-2 


number viewers (000) 


2,467 


8,634 


925 


3,392 






% total population segment 


4.6 


14.8 


5.8 


1.1.3 






13,134 


% total viewers 


14 


59 


6 


21 




2-3 


number viewers (000) 


1,839 


7,749 


788 


2,758 






% total population segment 


3.3 


13.4 


4.9 


9.2 






14,784 


% total viewers 


16 


54 


7 


23 




3-4 


number viewers (000) 


2,366 


7,983 


1,035 


3,400 






% total population segment 


4.4 


13.8 


6.5 


11.3 






20, 909 


% total viewers 


15 


46 


11 


28 




4-5 


number viewers (000) 


3,136 


9,618 


2,300 


5,855 






% total population segment 


5.8 


16.6 


14.4 


19.5 






29,845 


% total viewers 


16 


31 


15 


38 




5-6 


number viewers (000) 


4,775 


9,252 


4,477 


11,341 






% total population segment 


8.9 


15.9 


28 


37.7 






38,623 


% total viewers 


21 


30 


14 


35 




6-7 


number viewers (000) 


8,111 


11,587 


5,407 


13,518 






% total population segment 


15 


20 


33.8 


45 





Audience composition figures above add another dimen- 
sion to the usual data. In addition to showing the number 
of viewers rather than homes, the figures go beyond the 
practice of showing what percent of viewers in each time 
period are men, etc. Using the total number of men, etc., 
in the U.S. population as a base, the chart also shows 
what percent of each population segment (men, women, 



etc.) is reached during the time period — a useful market- 
ing statistic. Number of viewers per time period and the 
usual audience composition breakdown comes from Nielsen 
(March 1958, Monday through Friday). Percent of total 
population segment reached was calculated by SPONSOR 
on the basis of population data worked out by Richard 
Dunne, media coordinator of SSCB as of 1 July 1958. 



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100 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 





THEIR 
TIME 

IS YOUR 
TIME 
IN DETROIT! 



with WJBK-TV's EARLY SHOW movie! 




Busy day behind them . . . Time to relax. Now's 
the highlight of their day with a topflight movie— 
WJBK-TV's "Early Show," Monday through Fri- 
day, 5:00 to 6:30 PM - begins June 29. Team up with 
PARAMOUNT, UNITED ARTISTS, SCREEN 
GEMS, NTA and RKO to tap the 9-billiori-dollar 
sales potential in the nation's fifth market— at a 
strategically receptive time! 

WJBK-TV puts you right in the picture in 1,900,000 
television homes in Detroit and southeastern Michigan. 



Famous on the local scene 

WJBK-TV 



CHANNEL 



DETROIT 



100,000 Watts CBS AFFILIATE 1057-foot tower 



$£i Sto:re:r Television. 



Represented by the Katz Agency 
N.Y. Sales Office: 623 Madison Ave.. N.Y. 22 • PLaza L-3940 



m* 



WJBK-TV 

Detroit 



WJW-TV 
Cleveland 



WSPD-TV 

Toledo 



WAGA-TV 

Atlanta 



WITI-TV 

Milwaukee 



r J ] 

i TELEVISION 



Viewing habits 



How tv usage varies by months of the year 

|llll!llllllllll!llllllllllilllllll!l!lllllllllllllllilllllllllllillillll!l llillillll!lll!!P!ll!ll!lll!l!lillllllllIlllllillllllllliilllll!lllllllllllll!lllll ||||i!llllllilllil!IH| lillllllllll! I |||||||!||||||| Illllllllllllllllll!lli!llllll!lillllllli!lllllllll!lllll!!lllllllll |||||||||||||||||||||||||||||| ||||||| ||| IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH 

Average hours viewing per tv home per day Percent tv homes watching per avg. minute 

MONTH DAILY HRS. 6 AM-6 PM (M-F) 6 PM-MID. (ALL DAYS) 



May 1958 


4 hrs. 


14 min. 


June 1958 


4 hrs. 


17 min. 


July 1958 


4 hrs. 


10 min. 


Aug. 1958 


4 hrs. 


3 min. 


Sept. 1958 


4 hrs. 


23 min. 


Oct. 1958 


4 hrs. 


58 min. 


Nov. 1958 


5 hrs. 


23 min. 


Dec. 1958 


5 hrs. 


47 min. 


Jan. 1959 


5 hrs. 


55 min. 


F,l>. 1959 


5 hrs. 


52 min. 


Mar. 1959 


5 hrs. 


40 min. 


Apr. 1959 


5 hrs. 


23 min. 



SOURCE: A. C. Nielsen 



11.9 


41.4 


12.5 


40.2 


13.7 


36.6 


13.3 


35.6 


12.2 


42.2 


14.3 


17,1 


14.8 


51.8 


16.9 


54.0 


18.2 


55.0 


18.0 


54.7 


18.0 


52.6 


17.1 


51.4 






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How viewing differs in three time zones 



Viewing habits by hours vary great- 
ly in different time zones, as shown 
by ARB figures at right and below. 
This is particularly noticeable during 
the morning and late evening. Per- 
cent-of-homes figures cover hour be- 
ginning at time shown top of column 



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Percent homes using tv by zones, Dec, 1958, Sun. thru Sat. eve. 



ZONE 


6 P.M. 


7 


8 


9 


10 


1 1 


MID. 


Eastern 


42.5 


55.4 


66.7 


63.9 


52. 1 


24.4 


12.9 


Central 


54.9 


66.9 


68.0 


61.7 


35.6 


17.2 


4.2 



Pacific 48.5 62.3 68.9 63.5 38.5 15.7 5.0 

iiuniJiuniiiiinmuumnuiiiuuniuiuiiiiiuuiunniiiiniminiuiuniuinmunmiuimunmuniiiunminmiuninniiinEm 



1 1 ' . i : i : < .in:- : . j i ! j : - : ! i ! ; : ' i i 1 1 'in' ^ - : 1. 1 1 ' , i ! : . i : i ' 'ir , : i ! ^ in- 1 1 1 : ' - . : 1 1 ' in ' in ' i i " m i : i i : i 1 1 ' : m ' : . ' ' : 1 1 : : 1 1 1 ^ < : ; i u , 1 1 1 j , 1 1 1 : ' : 1 1 1 1 : 

Percent homes using tv by zones, December 1958, Monday thru Friday daytime 



= Pacific 



4.5 



I. 



9.9 



11.6 



12.9 



11.2 



11.7 



12.9 



13.1 



19.8 



= 


ZONE 


7 A.M. 


8 


9 


io 


1 1 


N 


1 PM 


2 


3 


4 


5 


I 


Eastern 


t .o 


15.0 


13.5 


14.0 


19.9 


22.0 


16.6 


15.3 


14.4 


26.7 
26.8 


35.3 


1 


Central 


10.6 


16.4 


16.2 


20.1 


18.2 


18.5 


15.5 


13.2 


17.5 


36.6 



33.2 



nil 



^iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiimiiiiimiiiiimmimim 



Average viewing time morning, afternoon and evening 

iimiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiimmiiimiiiiiiiiiimiimmiiiiim 

Average hours viewing per home per day by day part 





NICHT 


AFTERNOON 


MORNING 


TOTAL DAY 


Mon.-Fri. 


3 hrs. 39 min. 


1 hr. 32 min. 


39 min. 


5 hrs. 50 min. 


Saturday 


4 hrs. 3 min. 


1 hr. 31 min. 


48 min. 


6 hrs. 22 min. 


Sunday 


3 hrs. 43 min. 


1 hr. 44 min. 


16 min. 


5 hrs. 43 min. 


All Days 


3 hrs. 43 min. 


1 hr. 33 min. 


37 min. 


5 hrs. 53 min. 



SOntCE: NTI, Jan. -Feb. 1959 

milium 



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102 



AIR MEDIA BASICS 



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limelight 
medium 

The spot medium is now 
\ more than ever 
in the spotlight 
as astute advertisers 
, continue to discover that 
| when spot is used 
|t as a primary medium, 

it kindles its most 
^spectacular successes . . . 
: moves unprecedented 
- mountains of merchandise. 

Equally in the limelight 
is H-R's total service policy 
which assures represented 
i. stations that continued 

research, promotion 
and programming services 
a vitally contribute to 

all their areas of operation. 
Another facet of its 
Working Partnership credo, 
total service implements 
H-R's basic sales function. 



'We always send a man to do a man's job' 



rj- .aftf TTTE Television, Inc. 
wW\ llXV Representatives 



New York • Chicago • San Francisco • Hollywood • Dallas • Detroit • Atlanta • Houston • Ne 



Des Moines 



mi.\ 1959 



103 



r 3 1 

TELEVISION 



Viewing habits 



How tv's daytime and nighttime audiences differ 



pilllilllllllllllllllllllll!i!!lll!ll!lllllllllllll!lilllllllllll!!l!llllllll 

THE TV AUDIENCE (BY FIFTHS) ACCORDING TO WEEKLY HOURS OF VIEWING 

A. The total weekly audience 



HOMES 

REACHED 

000'S 



AVG HOURS 
PER HOME 
REACHED 



SUN-SAT 
CUMULATIVE 

AUDIENCE 
40.035 



NIGHTTIME 

QUINTILES 



94.2 



2475 



HOME 
HOURS 
VIEWING 



100% 




990.866 


11.58 


20% „ 

20% ^"' 

•-- 
20% ,"' 

20% ^ ., 

20% 


92.640 


165,037 


2063 


200477 


2506 


236397 


2955 


296.3IS 


37.04 



HOMES 

REACHED 

000'S 



AVG HOURS 
PER HOME 
REACHED 



MOK-FRI 

CUMULATIVE 

AUOIENCE 

36.168 



DAYTIME 

QUINTILES 



85.1 



HOME 
HOURS 
VIEWING 



100% 




458.972 


1.67 


20% / 

" y 

20% / 
20% / 

/ A 

20% / 

/ 
/ 

/ 

20% 


,»..«! 


37.626 


73,730 


519 
1017 


121.939 


2 13.569 


1682 


2946 



3% 

8% 



B. Weekly audience by age of housewife 

NIGHTTIME DAYTIME 



SUN -SAT. 

CUMULATIVE 
AUDIENCE 

942% 

AGE OF HOUSEWIFE 100% 



NONE 



190 



" 



AVERAGE HOURS 
PER HOME 



NEXT 

20% 



(N I9J 



^ 



__ 



15.3 


199 






344 


29.5 


i 

y//A 





m 



, 



^ 



' ,14.1; 



n-ss if- ot ao.« w.st 



MON-FRI 

CUMULATIVE 
AUDIENCE 

851% 

AGE OF HOUSEWIFE 100% 



^26io 



164 



III 



_ 



AVG HOURS PER 
HOME REACHED 



20% 



20% 



lightest 
next viewing 
20% 20% 



PI 




m 



85 



262. 



A V l/ A 

r 35.5"> 



-J 



24! 



&*&> 

te 



156 


284 


348 


•>29.cK; 


340 


277 


'y/y-- 

156 

//,■/ . 


149 < 



16 82 



C. Weekly audience by size of family 



NIGHTTIME 



FAMILY 9UE 



SUN- SAT 

CUMULATIVE HEAVIEST 

AUDIENCE VIEWING 

20% 



MEXT 

20% 



NEXT 

20% 



AVERAGE HOURS 



27G. 

t_ 



Ji 



369 





274 




151 


389 


185 


v///< 


II 



365 


X42V^ 


468 


442 


fa ■ 



y liS '-; 



37B4 



25 06 



2063 



1158 



The charts above, produced from A. C. Nielsen mate- 
rial, profile viewing by listing all sample homes in terms of 
weekly hours of viewing, starting with the heaviest and 
proceeding down to the lightest viewing home. The list is 
then divided into five (hence, quintile) equal parts and the 
average from each group of 20% is used in the charts. The 



MON- FBI 

CUMULATIVE 
AUOIENCE 

851% 



FANILV 51 IE 
1-2 



1T> 

, , , , 



JOQJL 



DAYTIME 



20% 



NEKT 

20% 



NEXT 
20% 



LIGHTEST 

VIEWING 

20% 



41.8 









197 ^ K\, +r x 



352 






426 



\-284k] 



426 



: 



L_J 









333 



227/ 

'///■Z 






v 2i.i^ 



AVG HOURS PER 
HOME REACHED 



1269 



quintiles shown in the top charts are used in the age-of- 
housewife and size-of-family breakdowns. Charts show, 
among other things, that daytime viewing homes vary more 
in level of viewing than nighttime viewing homes and that 
heavy viewing, both day and night, is greatest among homes 
with young housewives. Data is based on 2-8 March 1958 



aniiiiiiiiiira 



104 



4IR MEDIA BASICS 




Smidley,you bug me! 

"Over a BILLION DOLLARS* layin' there like one 
big single-station market and it zipped right by ya, 
Smid. Why, any other time buyer would have grabbed 
it — zowee! So simple, Smidley. One order, four sta- 
tions and you've got it. The Cascade network alone 
reaches it all — sells it all. 

*E.B.I. $1,013,982,500. Source: Sales Management 1959 "Survey of Buying Power." 




KIMA-TV 

YAKIMA 

KEPR-TV 

PASCO 

KLEW-TV 

LEWISTON 

KBAS-TV 

EPHRATA 



TELEVISION 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: George P. Hollingbery • PACIFIC NORTHWEST: Moore & Associates 
JULY 1959 L05 



3 



TELEVISION 



SPENDING AND COSTS 



Tv ad expenditures 
have doubled 
in five years 



McCann-Erickson figures prepared for 
Printers Ink i- the source of chart at right. 
Besides tv, media include radio, news- 
papers, magazines, outdoor, business pa- 
pers, direct mail, miscellaneous. Tv figures 
include all client spending: time, talent, 
production and commercials. TvB prelim- 
inary estimates for 1959: SI. 469.000.000 



Tv advertising and share 



of all advertising, 1949-58 



Year 


Total 
advertising 


Total tv 
advertising 


Percent tv 
is of total 


1958 


$10,196,000,000 


$1,360,000,000 


13.3% 


1957 


10,310,600,000 


1,273.400.000 


12.4% 


1956 


9,904,700,000 


1,206.700,000 


12.2% 


1955 


9,194,400.000 


1,025,300,000 


11.2% 


1954 


8,164,100,000 


809,200,000 


9.9% 


1953 


7,755,300.000 


606,100,000 


7.8% 


1952 


7,156,200,000 


453,900,000 


6.3% 


1951 


6,426.100,000 


332,300,000 


5.2% 


1950 


5,710,000,000 


170,800,000 


3.0% 



1949 



5.202,200.000 



57,800X00 



1.1% 



W 



Networks take 54% of all tv ad dollars 

piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

NETWORK: $735,000,000 SPOT: $365,ooo,ooo LOCAL: $260,000,000 

SOURCE: McCann-Erickson, "Printers Ink" preliminary estimates, time, talent and production, 1958, 

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Tv broadcast 
revenues hit 
$1 billion in 1957 



Tv has become a billion dollar busi- 
ness in 10 years. Figures are from FCC. 
cover networks and stations. Note level- 
ing off in rate of increase of both revenues 
and expenses in recent years. These are 
latest figures available from the government 

106 



i^i 1 ;r ill! f;,i;i;' Mill, ^riiinr':; jr, rii, jii, ill ,iiii iiii; mii: ill i 
Tv industry revenue and expense, 1948-57 



Year 


Total broadcast 
revenues (000* 


Percent 
increase 


Total broadcast 
expenses (000) 


Percent 
increase 


1957 


$943,200 


5.2% 


1783.200 


10.7% 


1956 


896,900 


20.4% 


707.300 


19.0% 


1955 


744,700 


25.6% 


594,500 


18.3% 


1954 


592,937 


37.3% 


502.637 


39.4% 


1953 


431,777 


33.4% 


360,514 


34.6% 


1952 


323,594 


37.3% 


267.902 


38.0% 


1951 


235,684 


122.5% 


191,086 


68.6%, 


1950 


105,914 


208.5% 


115.128 


93.2% 


1949 


34,329 


294.6% 


59,591 


152.5% 



1948 



6.700 358.8% 



23.600 






liillllllllilllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllilllllH 
AIR MEDIA BASICS 



3 



television J Spending and costs 



Some facts and figures on network tv expenditures 

h' ir iiiMii;Miiii[Jiiif[nMi!:iiiiiiiiii<n[iiMiiiiii!ri iFiinr'i!!': - : .m :i ,i: : <ii:'; ,i iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiililliillllll 

Network billings by network 



Network 


1957 


1958 


Change 


ABC 


$ 83,071,284 


$103,016,938 


+24.0 


CBS 


239,284,899 


247,782.734 


+ 3.6 


NBC 


193,845,383 


215,790,729 


+ 11.3 




$516,201,566 


$566,590,401 


+ 9.8 


Network billings 


by months 


, 1958 


January 




$ 


49,606,735 


February 






44,638,074 


March 






49,488,074 


April